Friday, July 22, 2016

AASWomen Newsletter for July 22, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 22, 2016
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, Heather Flewelling, and Christina Thomas

This week's issues:

1. Cross-Post: "We Got This," featuring take aways from the United State of Women Conference

2. How Sexual Harassment Halts Science

3. What Happens When a Harassment Whistleblower Goes on the Science Job Market

4. Women with the Right Stuff

5. USRA Names Louise M. Prockter Director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute

6. Really? You don’t look like a scientist.

7. Job Opportunities

8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues


1. Cross-Post: "We Got This," featuring take aways from the United State of Women Conference

From: Christina Richey via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This feature is a re-post from The Huffingpost, and is hosted on the Huffington Post’s Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and post freely to their site. The original piece can be found here.

About the author: Kimberly Arcand is Visualization Lead for the Chandra X-ray Observatory. She is a co-author of popular science books including “Light: The Visible Spectrum and Beyond“ and “Your Ticket to the Universe: A Guide to Exploring the Cosmos.”

Last month, I was honored to attend an extraordinary event: the United State of Women Summit convened by the White House. Since the word “summit” means a pinnacle, this couldn’t have been more appropriate for how I viewed this day and the amazing attendees I was able to share it with.

The United State of Women Summit brought together leaders in all different professional fields – from politics to entertainment, from science to finance. The common thread among all of the participants, however, was easy to find: everyone there wanted to continue to foster and enhance the opportunities for girls and women in whatever endeavors they may choose to pursue.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/07/cross-post-we-got-this-featuring-take.html

Back to top.
2. How Sexual Harassment Halts Science
by Vince Grzegorek

From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

Katherine Alatalo, a graduate student in astronomy at the University of California–Berkeley, spent months wondering what was wrong with her. Why did she feel anxious and unfocused? Why couldn’t she get any work done? And then, a late-night G-chat conversation with a fellow student made her realize what was causing her such distress: Her friend relayed a conversation she’d had with other students and a professor, where they had discussed a different professor and how he had a “fascination with” Alatalo’s breasts. That the professor mentioned his colleague’s “obsession” at all, let alone in casual conversation, made Alatalo’s friend furious—“it was totally inappropriate,” Alatalo’s friend wrote. It was then—with the help of her friend’s outrage—that she realized the problem. She was being sexually harassed.

Read more at

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2016/07/sexual_harassment_has_devastating_consequences_on_victims_ability_to_perform.html

Back to top.
3. What Happens When a Harassment Whistleblower Goes on the Science Job Market
by Sarah Scoles

From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

When astronomer Sarah Ballard walked onto the University of California, Berkeley, campus for an academic job interview in February, it was a homecoming. She had attended college there, walking to class underneath the Seussian London plane trees as the campanile chimed periodically in the background.

Berkeley had made her the exoplanet-studying scientist she was. It had taught her well, prepared her for graduate school, and propelled her into a successful career, including her current position at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It had, in fact, prepared her so well that she was back, being considered for a professorship at one of the country’s top astronomy departments. And what a nice narrative—to have come full circle.

Read more at

http://www.wired.com/2016/07/happens-harassment-whistleblower-goes-science-job-market

Back to top.
4. Women with the Right Stuff

From: Claire Foullon [C.Foullon_at_exeter.ac.uk]

The first footsteps on the Moon were one giant step for 'man', but from the early days of aeronautics women have also been involved in space travel. In Women with the Right Stuff, presenter, pilot and aspiring astronaut Wally Funk pays tribute to the pioneers, meets some of those involved within today’s space industry, and hears from the woman who might be among the crew for the first human mission to Mars.

Watch the documentary at

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p040zfss

Back to top.
5. USRA Names Louise M. Prockter Director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Dr. Louise M. Prockter has been named the next Director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in Houston. Prockter will be the first woman to serve as LPI Director.

Read more at

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/features/071916/prockter

Back to top.
6. Really? You don’t look like a scientist.
by Katherine Lindemann

From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

Research shows women who look feminine are judged less likely to be scientists. Women in science have plenty of anecdotal evidence that looking feminine and “looking like a scientist” at times seem mutually exclusive. They’ve revealed their professions at parties to be met with surprise, been asked where the professor is in their own university offices, thought maybe they shouldn’t wear a dress to that conference. Now there’s scientific evidence as well. A recent paper in the journal Sex Roles reveals that people viewing photos of real researchers are more likely to associate women with non-science occupations if they appear more feminine. Lead author Sarah Banchefsky of the University of Colorado Boulder tells us more.

Read more at

https://www.researchgate.net/blog/post/really-you-dont-look-like-a-scientist

Back to top.
7. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Support Scientist, STScI https://rn11.ultipro.com/SPA1004/JobBoard/JobDetails.aspx?__ID=*DCDF56CAA264F009

- Assistant Scientist, NRAO https://cw.na1.hgncloud.com/nrao/loadJobPostingDetails.do?jobPostingID=102900&source=jobList

- Division Head - Electronics, NRAO https://cw.na1.hgncloud.com/nrao/loadJobPostingDetails.do?jobPostingID=102760&source=jobListr

- Assistant Scientist, NRAO https://cw.na1.hgncloud.com/nrao/loadJobPostingDetails.do?jobPostingID=102841&source=jobList

- Research Engineer in Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelength Electronics, NRAO https://cw.na1.hgncloud.com/nrao/loadJobPostingDetails.do?jobPostingID=102480&source=jobList

Back to top.
8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

Back to top.
9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

Back to top.
10. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

Back to top.