Friday, July 1, 2016

AASWomen Newsletter for July 01, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 01, 2016
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, & Heather Flewelling

This week's issues:

1. Mentoring Minoritized* Students

2. Finding space after Orlando

3. Rising Stars in Physics: An Academic Career Workshop for Women

4. NASA Engages Women with Data Science

5. Cornell University astronomer recognized for outstanding science achievement

6. NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins Prepares for First Trip to Space

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. Mentoring Minoritized* Students

From: Sarah Tuttle via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

A fundamental part of our role in academia, formally or informally, is mentorship. Although rarely trained in what that means (either as a mentee or a mentor) it is a crucial piece of how we move through academia. With increasing recognition about the role of mentorship in our careers I'd like to share some starting points for improving your mentoring of minoritized students. For those of us who find themselves minoritized in some ways but not others - these are still incredibly important.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/06/mentoring-minoritized-students.html

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2. Finding space after Orlando

From: Jessica Mink via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[MacKenzie Warren is just starting a postdoc at Michigan State University after completinghis PhD in Physics at University of Notre Dame. MacKenzie's research is in computational modeling of core-collapse supernovae, particularly the role of nuclear and neutrino processes in the explosion mechanism. The killings in Orlando affected all of us in the LGBTQ community; here is one astronomer's opinion.]

A few weeks ago, I was at an astrophysics conference. I spent the week in a room with roughly 50 people brought together by common interests and shared identity. Just as a few weeks before that I had spent an evening at a gay bar with others who also sought refuge from the tense hum of nerves that comes from always being aware of who's watching. Just as so many people had been drawn to Pulse in Orlando, looking for a place of affirmation.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/06/finding-space-after-orlando.html

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3. Rising Stars in Physics: An Academic Career Workshop for Women

From: Johanna Teske [jteske_at_carnegiescience.edu]

Please encourage early career women in physics and astronomy, particularly those from minoritized groups, to apply to the Rising Stars in Physics Workshop. Information can be found here:

http://physicsrisingstars.mit.edu/home

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4. NASA Engages Women with Data Science

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by APPEL News Staff

A recent NASA-hosted event examined current successes as well as future challenges and opportunities for getting women and girls to engage with data to solve key global concerns.

"Advancing gender equity and opening doors for women and girls in all the sectors and on all fronts is critical to maximizing our potential as a nation and as a planet," said NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan, speaking at NASA's Engaging Women and Girls in STEM through Data Science event, which was part of the White House's United State of Women Summit.

The U.S. has made great efforts to integrate women into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, and NASA's workforce is a prime example. "Women have made significant contributions to our agency since its inception," said Stofan. She stated that the newest class of astronauts is 50% women and 50% men, and added, "NASA is more than just astronauts. We have women engineers, mathematicians, geologists, biologists, astrophysicists, and-yes-rocket scientists. We have women leading our centers, overseeing launches, building rockets, studying our earth, studying the stars, interpreting data of all kinds."

Nonetheless, cautioned NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman, challenges remain. "Here at NASA, we're less than a third women overall. Engineers we're over 20%. That's not good enough."

Read more at

http://appel.nasa.gov/2016/06/28/nasa-engages-women-with-data-science

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5. Cornell University astronomer recognized for outstanding science achievement

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Cornell University

Lisa Kaltenegger, associate professor of astronomy and director of Cornell's Carl Sagan Institute, has been name the inaugural recipient of the Barrie Jones Award by The Open University (OU), United Kingdom, and the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB). The award will be presented in a ceremony on July 7 at the OU campus.

The Barrie Jones Award recognises an individual's contribution to society and outstanding achievement in science and outreach through work relating to astrobiology. It was established by the OU Department of Physical Sciences in partnership with the ASB with the legacy of the late Barrie Jones (1941-2014), an astrobiologist at the OU, who dedicated much of his career to public engagement and outreach.

Read more at

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-06/cu-cua062916.php

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6. NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins Prepares for First Trip to Space

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Guest Blogger

NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins will be the next American to travel out of this world when she launches one week from today on her first mission to the International Space Station.

On July 6th, Rubins and her two crew mates, cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and astronaut Takuya Onishi of Japan, will blast off from Kazakhstan inside a Soyuz rocket to join the rest of their Expedition 48 colleagues at the space station.

Read more at

http://scitechnation.com/nasa-astronaut-kate-rubins-prepares-for-first-trip-to-space

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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