Friday, February 21, 2014

AASWomen February 21, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 21, 2014
eds. Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, amp; Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. Sexual Harassment: A Call to Shun

2. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

3. Preparing for International Women's Day

4. Women's History Month - Astronomy & Space Exploration

5. Women in Italian Astronomy

6. National Astronomy Week

7. Job Opportunities

8. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Sexual Harassment: A Call to Shun
From: Joan Schmelz at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Some months back, I came face-to-face with one of the astronomy community’s most notorious sexual harassers. There I was, minding my own business, making my way through the coffee line, when BOOM! He turned around, and there was no escape. I’ve known about him for years, listened with sympathy to the stories from his victims, trying to figure out how to help. I understood the damage he had done to the vulnerable young astronomers who found themselves in his sights. I’ve talked to CSWA, AAS council members, and his university/laboratory/institution colleagues about what to do and how to stop him. I always come away empty – he’s too powerful, too popular, and too successful.

People had told me that he was charming, and he started ...

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

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2. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin
From: Neil Gehrels at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

There are a lot of neat people stories in the history of science. I've recently been interested in women astronomers who made major advances but are not as well known as the big 3: Caroline Herschel, Annie Jump Cannon and Henrietta Swan Leavitt. This month I am writing about Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin (1900-1979) who stuck with her convictions to make big discoveries on the nature of stars. She has a really nice autobiography called "The Dyers Hand" (published in the collection "Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections") which I found in the Stanford stacks during a recent visit.

Cecilia Payne ...

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

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3. Preparing for International Women's Day
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

International Women's Day is March 8th and has been celebrated since the early 1900's. The hub for modern International Women's Day information is now online - a single website that lists news, events, and resources anywhere and everywhere in the world. As of now, 526 events are listed worldwide. To find a women's astronomy or other event in your area, please see:

http://www.internationalwomensday.com

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4. Women's History Month - Astronomy & Space Exploration
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

March is Women's History Month in the Unite States. Nick Greene at About.com discusses the contributions of women to astronomy and space exploration as part of Women's History Month. Among those in the list are Hypatia, Caroline Herschel, Mary Somerville, Maria Mitchell, and a newcomer to the list, Beth Brown, among others.

To read about these women, please see

http://space.about.com/od/biographies/a/womenshistory.htm

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5. Women in Italian Astronomy
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

Francesca Matteucci, Universita di Trieste, Chair of INAF Scientific Council and Raffaele Gratton, INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova recently submitted a journal article about the role of women in Italian astronomy. They find that career prospects for Italian astronomers are worse for women than men, similar to prospects in the USA and Germany. They conclude that implicit sex discrimination factors probably dominate over explicit factors.

To read more about the submitted journal article, please see

http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.1952

or

http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1402/1402.1952.pdf

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6. National Astronomy Week
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

National Astronomy Week (NAW) is March 1-8. The focus this year is on Jupiter, which will reach its highest point in our skies in early March, the next time of which will not occur for many more years. NAW is an event held every few years in the United Kingdom to promote awareness about astronomy. This NAW event also includes talks on Women in Astronomy. Not all events occur in the UK; some occur in Spain and some allow for remote participation such as star counts and the speed of light challenge. Through the use of binoculars, amateur astronomers can view a pre-selected region of the sky and count star, submitting their final numbers via an online survey. The speed of light challenge engage amateur astronomers through repeating Romer's experiment to measure the speed of light.

To read more about these events and how you can participate, please see

http://www.astronomyweek.org.uk

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7. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

* Program Director, Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Unit, Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation.

See  https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/361729900

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8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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10. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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