Friday, February 28, 2014

AASWOMEN February 28, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 28, 2014
eds. Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, & Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. STATUS newsletter for January 2014 now available online

2. Guest post: AAS Dinners to Discuss Dual-Career Couples

3. Addressing the Campus Rape Culture in the US

4. US Position Threatened?

5. Additional Women's History Month Resources

6. Embracing Adventure, Achieving Success

7. APS March Meeting Events Focused on Women and Minorities

8. Summer AAPT meeting requests posters/papers

9. Job Opportunities

10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. STATUS newsletter for January 2014 now available online
From: Nancy Morrison [nmorris_at_utnet.utoledo.edu]

The January 2014 issue of CSWA's newsletter STATUS is now posted online. Thanks to all the authors and to the editorial group for a great job!

http://www.aas.org/cswa/status/Status_2014_Jan.pdf

Contents:

The 2013 CSWA Demographics Survey - by A. Meredith Hughes

Note from the Editor - by Nancy Morrison

Why We Resist Unconscious Bias - by Meg Urry

NSF Support of Women in Academia Since 1982 - by Nancy Morrison

Report on "NextGen VOICES Results: Work-Life Balance" - by Johanna Teske

Fed Up with Sexual Harassment - by Dara Norman

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2. Guest post: AAS Dinners to Discuss Dual-Career Couples
From: David Charbonneau via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Today I am sharing a guest post by P. R. McCullough. Dr. McCullough received a PhD in Astrophysics from UC Berkeley in 1993, then moved to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign first on a Hubble fellowship, then becoming an assistant professor. Dr. McCullough moved to the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD in 2002 and is an associate astronomer there.]

How many times have you read, "We seek a highly motivated and qualified individual ... "?

Young's double slit experiment, Cooper pairs, quantum entanglement, these and other phenomena are understood not by treating the associated individuals independently, but by acknowledging their duality. For Young's double-slit experiment, by considering the light passing through one slit or the other slit individually, you will get the wrong answer, every time, regardless of your own good intentions, your institution's policies, and even society's human-made laws.

Likewise, human behavior often is better understood by acknowledging pairs, coupling, or the duality of a situation. For example, if you wish to hire or to retain an individual for a position, you may ... well ... get the wrong answer by treating the situation in that manner. Dual-career issues are pervasive and pernicious in a niche career such as astronomy.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/02/guest-post-aas-dinners-to-discuss-dual.html

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3. Addressing the Campus Rape Culture in the US
From: Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Trigger Warning: this blog entry refers to sexual assault on college and university campuses.

Unpleasant topics should not always be avoided. Ask any college or university president or provost what her or his top concerns are, and chances are that the top five will include sexual violence. That's because one in five women are sexually assaulted while in college and the spotlight is being turned on colleges in a serious way. Two weeks ago, the University of Virginia hosted a conference on this topic; one month ago the White House launched a new initiative to reduce sexual assault on campuses. Numerous colleges and universities face sexual assault investigations under Title IX, and a new law, the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act, is going into effect this year. Every college and university that receives federal funding -- including all those with students receiving Pell grants -- is now required to provide ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and faculty. They are coming soon to colleges and universities near you.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/02/addressing-campus-rape-culture-in-us.html

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4. US Position Threatened?
From: AWIS in Action! February 2014

This month the National Science Board released Science and Engineering Indicators 2014. These are metrics of funding, participation, education, and public attitudes towards science. Womenँऒs participation in science continues to slowly creep upward, as according to this study they now make up 28% of science and engineering workers. This is up from 21% in 1993, smaller growth than might have been expected over a nearly 20 year period. Historically underrepresented minorities, including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaska Natives, account for 26% of the population, but only 10% of US STEM workers. However, those numbers have not been driving the national conversation about this study.

To read more, please see

http://awisblog.wordpress.com/awis-in-action/february-2014/us-position-threatened

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5. Additional Women's History Month Resources
From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

Regarding the women in astronomy history post. There are two resources in addition to the ones you mention:

1. www.astronomy.ua.edu/4000WS -- a web site for students with short descriptions of over 4,000 years of women in science and technology. En Hedu'anna was the first scientist in history and she was an astronomer. There are several women earlier than Hypatia.

2. Also see the book /The Hidden Giants/ available through Amazon and on Kindle. It tells the brief (and documented) story of several hundred women who contributed to astronomy, science, and technology. It begins with En Hedu'anna.

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6. Embracing Adventure, Achieving Success
From: Matthew A. Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

[Robotic operator and aerospace engineer Natalie Panek celebrates the inspirational female adventurers who have turned their enthusiasm for outdoor pursuits into a career, considering how embracing a sense of adventure could assist women to succeed in all areas of business, enabling self-discovery, leadership skills and confidence in risk-taking.]

I recently watched the premiere of Into the Mind by Sherpas Cinema. The movie is a mind-blowing, big mountain ski film with epic footage of adventure at its best, leaving you in sensory overload and loving every second of it. As I processed the unparalleled imagery, I noticed that women represented only about ten percent of the athletes in the film.

To read more, please see

http://www.thenextwomen.com/2014/01/30/embracing-adventure-achieving-success

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7. APS March Meeting Events Focused on Women and Minorities
From: WIPHYS Posting for Feb 28, 2014

* Women in Physics Meetups Tuesday, March 4

* LGBT Roundtable Discussion Wednesday, March 5, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

* NSBP Networking Session Wednesday, March 5, 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

* Diversity Networking Reception Wednesday, March 5, 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

To learn more about these events, please see

http://www.aps.org/meetings/march/events/index.cfm

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8. Summer AAPT meeting requests posters/papers
From: WIPHYS Posting for Feb 28, 2014

Many physics faculty develop a course with the focus on 'Gender in Science' or 'Women in Physics'. The session will begin with an invited panel but we are inviting anyone who has worked on teaching/developing this course to bring posters highlighting their work. After the panelists we will break into a mini-poster session and share our experiences.

Please consider contributing a poster to the Teaching the Women in Physics Course session at the Summer AAPT meeting in Minneapolis, July 26-30. Even if you miss the March 3rd deadline for submitting an abstract please consider bringing one to the meeting anyway.

Contact the session organizer, Juan Burciaga [jburciag_at_mthlyoke.edu], if you have questions.

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9. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

* Visiting Assistant Professor, Physics Department, Albion College (one-year; Astronomers welcome!)

http://www.albion.edu/about-albion/administrative-divisions/finance-and-administration/offices-and-programs/human-resources/employment-opportunities/faculty-positions/posting/62/visiting-assistant-professor-in-physics-one-year-replacement

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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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12. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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