Friday, August 16, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for August 16, 2019


Image credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 16, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi

This week's issues:

1. Happy 100th Birthday Margaret Burbidge!

2. Mourning the loss Ph.D. Student José Flores Velázquez

3. You can't think outside the box if you're locked inside it

4. 4 Hurdles to Successful Salary Negotiation — and How to Tackle Them

5. The Scully Effect and the Feminist Future of STEM

6. Fermilab promotes science and diversity at Wakandacon in Chicago

7. Lancet Editors Reject ‘Manels’ With New Policy

8. America's Top STEM Schools For Women

9. Job Opportunities

10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Happy 100th Birthday Margaret Burbidge!
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

August 12 is the 100th birthday of Dr. Margaret Burbidge. Her contributions to the field of astronomy include verifying nucleosynthesis in stars, measuring redshifts to some of the first quasars, and helping develop the Faint Object Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope &emdash among many others. In 1971, Margaret Burbidge refused to accept the AAS Council's Cannon Prize because "the prize, available only to women, was in itself discriminatory." The Council's response was to set up a committee, the "Special Committee on the Cannon Prize," which not only dealt with this issue but also recommended that the AAS review the status of women in astronomy. These events were the catalyst that started the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA).

Dr. Burbidge impacted astronomy in so many ways. She is not only a brilliant researcher but also an inspiration to future astronomers. Today, the CSWA is honoring Dr. Burbidge by sharing stories that show her impact in advancing both discovery and community in the field of astronomy.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/08/happy-100th-birthday-margaret-burbidge.html

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2. Mourning the loss Ph.D. Student José Flores Velázquez
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By James Bullock

"Dear Physical Sciences community,

I write with a heavy heart to share that Physics & Astronomy Ph.D. student José Flores Velázquez was shot and killed in a drive-by shooting last night near his family home in Los Angeles. This is a tremendous loss for his family, friends, community and all of us here at UC Irvine and beyond."

Read more at

https://ps.uci.edu/news/50018

Donate to his memorial at

https://www.gofundme.com/f/funeral-for-jose-flores-velazquez

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3. You can't think outside the box if you're locked inside it
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

The American Association for the Advancement of Science is hosting a webinar focused on increasing diversity in the sciences. Topics to be addressed include whether or not the scientific workforce matches the broader population and how the homogeneity of the scientific workforce impacts scientific thought and our ability to solve complex world problems.

Learn more and register at

https://view6.workcast.net/register?cpak=7582995950513683&referrer=Blast2&et_rid=79813991&et_cid=2942450

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4. 4 Hurdles to Successful Salary Negotiation — and How to Tackle Them
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

"Talking to an employer — or a prospective one — about money is never easy. Some people find it so challenging, in fact, that they quickly accept the first salary offer that comes with a new job. Or they hesitate to ask for a raise, even when they’re 110% certain they deserve one.

That’s not the wisest way to go."

Read how to overcome those salary negotiation hurdles at

https://www.aauw.org/article/4-hurdles-to-successful-salary-negotiation-and-how-to-tackle-them

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5. The Scully Effect and the Feminist Future of STEM
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Lisa Niver

"During summer vacation, STEM still matters. How can we keep young girls and women interested in technology and the most lucrative jobs that will define our future?

The fourth annual AT&T SHAPE 2019 conference this June at Warner Brothers Studios was focused on 5G and the future of entertainment—and in a jam-packed panel called “The Scully Effect,” actor and activist Geena Davis, The Big Bang Theory cast member Mayim Bialik and astrophysicist Erin Macdonald discussed the leaky pipeline for women to careers in STEM, and how to make that future more female."

Read more at

https://msmagazine.com/2019/08/09/does-stem-matter-in-summer

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6. Fermilab promotes science and diversity at Wakandacon in Chicago
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Bailey Bedford

"In July, Fermilab joined Wakandacon in Chicago, the three-day Afro-futuristic celebration of the black experience, nerd culture and science. It was a perfect opportunity to present the public with a broader view of science and who can be a scientist.

Designed to be free from prejudice, Wakandacon included cosplay contests, videogame contests, panels on topics such as writing fan fiction as an African American girl, a variety of vendors and more. It embraced the themes of the Marvel blockbuster “Black Panther” and ran with them.

“Fermilab folds and jells very well with the Wakandacon mission,” said DanaSimone Stovall-Savage, an Aurora resident attending the event. “It is not just about Black Panther, but it’s about the things behind it — the technology, the innovation, the creativity, the opportunity to explore and to connect with other people and to learn more.”"

Read more at

https://news.fnal.gov/2019/08/fermilab-promotes-science-and-diversity-at-wakandacon-in-chicago

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7. Lancet Editors Reject ‘Manels’ With New Policy
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Yael L. Maxwell

"Editors of the 18 journals under the Lancet group have announced that they are adopting a new diversity pledge, part of which includes the policy that they will no longer sit on scientific panels comprised of all men."

Read more at

https://www.tctmd.com/news/lancet-editors-reject-manels-new-policy

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8. America's Top STEM Schools For Women
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

Based on my own personal experience and anecdotes, I would say these schools vary significantly by field in their treatment of women.

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/madisonfernandez/2019/08/15/americas-top-stem-schools-for-women/#ab297a06bd62

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9. Job Opportunities
For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:
https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Clare Booth Luce Assistant Professor of Physics, University of San Diego https://careers.pageuppeople.com/867/cw/en-us/job/493785/clare-boothe-luce-assistant-professor-of-physics

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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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12. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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