Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Take the Impact of Parenthood on Career Progression in STEMM Survey

Woman with short brown hair holding a megaphone
Image via mothersinscience.com/survey
There is still time to take the Impact of Parenthood on Career Progression in STEMM survey. This is a broad survey that aims to learn more about how parenthood affects career progression in STEMM and identify obstacles faced by people with children. This survey is open to everyone "working or studying in any professional sector of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics or Medicine (STEMM), at any career stage." They are especially interested in the responses of fathers. The survey closes Monday, November 30, 2020.

Take the survey at

https://wustl.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bELY3H9su9sNEQB


Learn more about the partners behind the survey at

Washington University in St. Louis
Parent in Science
500 Women Scientists
Femmes & Sciences
International Network of Women in Engineering and Sciences (INWES)

Friday, November 13, 2020

Thursday, November 12, 2020

A Strategic Plan for the 2020s

By Pat Knezek (former Chair, CSWA) and Nicolle Zellner (current Chair, CSWA) 

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) collected information via community surveys and forums about what our communities considered to be areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s. In a 2019 post, we stated that the goal would be to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers* that would be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on the state of the profession and (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s. 

We are thrilled to tell you that both goals have been accomplished!

In a series of weekly meetings for almost a year, a sub-group+ of the CSWA worked together to evaluate the community input related to four focus areas (Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics) and identified objectives in each of them. A draft of the resulting Strategic Plan was approved by the entire CSWA, and we then sought input from the Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy (CSMA), the Committee for Sexual-Orientation & Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA), the Working Group on Accessibility and Disability (WGAD), the DPS Professional Culture & Climate Subcommittee (PCCS), the AAS Committee on Employment, the AAS Education Committee, and the AAS President, Executive Officer, and Board. 

All of the input was seriously considered, 
and the Strategic Plan reflects the input received by all who responded.

Several of the Focus Areas now have active projects, including finalizing and submitting for publication a summary of the results of our 2019 survey; a proposed evaluation of hiring and retention practices at major institutions; and an evaluation of the dual-anonymous publication review process. Importantly, more intentional communications and collaborations among the AAS diversity committees (CSWA, CSMA, SGMA, and WGAD) are being established. Equally important is that the Strategic Plan is a living document that will be reviewed at least annually and updated as necessary.

You will be hearing more about these projects soon, and the CSWA will be seeking volunteers from the community to participate in any that interest them. We look forward to moving forward with these and other projects to come as we now work to implement the Plan!

"Bringing Astronomy Within Reach". Image by Feelsinara,



--

+ Members of the CSWA who primarily worked on drafting this plan are Jessica Mink, Greg Rudnick, Regina Jorgenson, Maria Patterson, James Tuttle Keane, Tiffany Stone-Wolbrecht, Stella Kafka, Nicolle Zellner, and Pat Knezek.



Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Meet Your CSWA: Sukanya Chakrabarti

Sukanya got her Ph.d. from UC Berkeley, held postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard and UC Berkeley, and is currently faculty at RIT.  She works broadly on a number of areas from galactic dynamics to time-domain astronomy.





Monday, October 19, 2020

Crosspost: Survey: Impact of Parenthood on Career Progression in STEMM

A baby wearing a yellow hat being held by a woman
Click to read a recent post by Mothers in Science about the effects of COVID on working mothers

By Ryan Watkins via Women in Planetary Science Blog

Motherhood is a determinant factor driving women away from their career track, yet few interventions or policies address the career obstacles faced by mothers, such as motherhood discrimination, a chronic lack of affordable childcare, and unequal sharing of childcare and housework. Our team at Mothers in Science is leading an international research project aimed at understanding how parenthood affects the career advancement of people working or studying in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine) fields.

Read more about the project and participate in the survey at

https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpress.com/2020/10/12/survey-impact-of-parenthood-on-career-progression-in-stemm/

Friday, October 16, 2020

AASWomen Newsletter for October 16, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of October 16, 2020
eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson, Jeremy Bailey, and Alessandra Aloisi

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. --eds.]

This week's issues:

1. When The Two-Body With Children Problem Turns Into The Divorced-With-Children Many-Body Problem 
Illustration of Kepler-47, a many-body system.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

2. Final Frontier? The Evolution of Planetary Science Missions  
3. Survey on effects of COVID-10 on work-life boundaries for women in STEM 
4. 2020 University of Michigan Virtual Graduate Fair
5. Why Is It So Hard to Fire a Tenured Sexual Predator? 
6. That advice to women to ‘lean in’, be more confident… it doesn’t help, and data show it  
7. Upcoming Planetary Science Research Positions at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
8. Job Opportunities
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

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1. When The Two-Body With Children Problem Turns Into The Divorced-With-Children Many-Body Problem
From: Jeremy Bailin via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Much has been written about navigating the two-body problem in academia. Any field where it is typical to assume that people will be able to move across countries and continents every 2-3 years until their mid-30s is an impediment to long term relationships. …

Sometimes relationships don't work out—so it is also important to talk about that. In particular, what happens when pairs of astronomers have children and are then expected to move for their careers, while no longer being in a relationship with the other parent? I certainly don't have definitive answers to this question, but I do have personal experience which I will share as an example of how it can work.

Read more at


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2. Final Frontier? The Evolution of Planetary Science Missions
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By Katherine Broendel

The latest episode of “Third Pod from the Sun” features an interview with Fran Bagenal, a planetary scientist at the University of Colorado Boulder. Bagenal provides an overarching view of different planetary missions and describes how the research and findings of each have built upon the innovations and discoveries that came before.  

In this episode, Bagenal also discusses the importance of education that engages students and the need to support the different pathways people take to pursue science.

Read the transcript and listen to the podcast at


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3. Survey on effects of COVID-10 on work-life boundaries for women in STEM
From: Curt Dodds [dodds_at_hawaii.edu]

Dr. Ellen Ernst Kossek, Professor of Management at Purdue University, is reaching out to individual women faculty members across the U.S. to report their work-life experiences to help inform a commissioned report for the National Academies of Sciences Committee, "Investigating the Potential Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Science, Engineering, and Medicine", to be published Spring 2021. The report will focus on work-life boundaries, domestic labor, and careers of women faculty affected by COVID-19 – with a special focus on those working in STEMM (Science Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Medicine).  Responses are requested by October 18, 2020. For questions, please contact Dr. Ellen  Ernst Kossek at ekossek_at_purdue.edu.

Fill out the survey at  


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4. 2020 University of Michigan Virtual Graduate Fair
From: Jean McKee [jarbaugh_at_umich.edu]

Rackham Graduate School is hosting its first-ever virtual graduate fair on Monday, October 26, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. (EST). Representatives from the Astronomy PhD program will be on hand to answer questions about the program and the graduate school search and application process. If you are in the earlier stages of your undergraduate studies, Rackham staff will be available to talk about summer research opportunities at Michigan and help you explore your academic interests. In partnership with our graduate faculty and programs, Rackham is committed to advancing excellence in graduate education by cultivating a vibrant and diverse student community to impact the public good through the scholarship and discoveries of our students and degree recipients. 

Register at 


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5. Why Is It So Hard to Fire a Tenured Sexual Predator? 
From: Jessica Mink [jmink_at_cfa.harvard.edu]

This article from the October 15 issue of "Academe Today" from "The Chronicle of Higher Education" enumerates the obstacles to getting sexual predation out of academia.

[Sign-in is required to read the article. –eds.]

Read more at


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6.  That advice to women to ‘lean in’, be more confident… it doesn’t help, and data show it
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

Labor economist Leonora Risse reports on whether or not the advice to women to “lean in” and show confidence in the workplace really works.

Read more at


Read the journal article at


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7. Upcoming Planetary Science Research Positions at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center  
From: Heidi Haviland [heidi.haviland_at_nasa.gov]

The Heliophysics and Planetary Science Branch at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, plans to offer multiple positions seeking scientists to conduct research and develop applications to solve challenging Planetary Science problems. Outstanding candidates have the potential to be selected for federal employment, joining more than 30 other federal employees, academic staff, and contractors supporting Planetary Science efforts within the Branch, a subset of the Science Research and Projects Division, and the Science and Technology Office at Marshall Space Flight Center.

Research Space Scientist positions will be offered for researchers in planetary science, with expertise in remote sensing of planets, moons, and asteroids, and the development of instrumentation for planetary science investigations. The selected candidates will add substantive capability synergistic with the current staff and the goals of NASA’s Artemis program and MSFC's strategy to integrate human space flight and science robotic capabilities in the Artemis era. The candidates will have an opportunity to lead the development of research proposals for new activities, execute funded projects, and share their accomplishments through conference participation and appropriate peer-reviewed literature.

The positions are expected to be announced in autumn 2020 under the category of Research Space Scientist and at the GS-13 grade level. Successful candidates will have had experience applying advanced tools, techniques, and/or data analysis/mining/machine learning techniques to datasets collected with remote sensing measurement techniques. Candidates should have made regular contributions to a research team with some guidance and direction, developed new analysis techniques to solve challenging problems, made contributions to peer-reviewed proposals in response to technical solicitations, and have contributed to peer-reviewed publications as part of a demonstrated publication record.

The formal announcement of the opportunity and related requirements will be posted in the near future at USAJobs (www.usajobs.gov) and can be found by searching with keyword NASA and location of Huntsville, Alabama. Applications are only accepted through the USAJobs portal, and United States citizenship is required to be eligible for these civil service positions. Candidates are encouraged to create a USAJobs profile well in advance to populate their resume and may also subscribe to USAJobs alerts received via email. Informal inquiries can be directed to Dr. David McKenzie, david.e.mckenzie_at_nasa.gov, 256-961-7896.

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8. Job Opportunities
 
For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity 
  
- Professor, Astrophysical Sciences AND Head of Theory, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 

- Assistant Professor Of Theoretical Quantum Physics, Cal State University – Long Beach

- Postdoctoral Scholar, The Center for Energy Research (CER), San Diego, CA

- Postdoctoral Position, MAVEN’s Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph Team, Boulder, CO

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9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org 

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address. 

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting. 

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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11. Access to Past Issues


Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

When The Two-Body With Children Problem Turns Into The Divorced-With-Children Many-Body Problem

Artist's concept that illustrates Kepler-47, the first transiting circumbinary system. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle
Much has been written about navigating the two-body problem in academia. Any field where it is typical to assume that people will be able to move across countries and continents every 2-3 years until their mid-30s is an impediment to long term relationships. This is compounded by the fact that many astronomers have relationships with other academics, who are commonly other astronomers, and so navigating two people who need to do that can become very difficult.

Sometimes relationships don't work out—so it is also important to talk about that. In particular, what happens when pairs of astronomers have children and are then expected to move for their careers, while no longer being in a relationship with the other parent? I certainly don't have definitive answers to this question, but I do have personal experience which I will share as an example of how it can work.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Meet Your CSWA, Gregory Rudnick

Gregory Rudnick grew up in Chicago. He started studying physics at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and graduated in 1996, after which he moved to the University of Arizona for the Ph.D. program in Astronomy. Half-way through his time there he moved to MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany to follow his adviser. After seven years of postdocs at MPA and NOAO, Tucson he started as a faculty member at the University of Kansas in 2008. He is currently a professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the KU Physics and Astronomy Department.

Greg is an observer who studies the evolution of galaxies using observatories on the ground and in space. He is especially interested in environmental effects on galaxy evolution. When not doing that, he runs an outreach program at a local high school, and he loves cooking, hiking, biking and being with his family.

Friday, September 11, 2020

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Retiring STATUS

First published in 1987, Status was the semiannual print (then electronic) publication of the CSWA. However, no issue has been published since January 2016. 

In early 2020, the CSWA voted to officially retire StatusThe committee determined that there were now other venues to present the type of content formerly published in Status. For example, some shorter, less formal articles that formerly were published in Status are now appearing in the Women in Astronomy blog and in AASWomen, and the CSWA plans to arrange for publication of longer, more scholarly articles in the Bulletin of the AAS (BAAS) now that it is again available for this purpose. 

The archive of Status issues, including a full table of contents, can be found here

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Crosspost: Maria Mitchell Women in Science Symposium Goes Virtual

Women of Science.jpg

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Maria Mitchell Women in Science Symposium will be held virtually on Friday, October 2, 2020 from 1:00 - 4:00 PM. Registration is free and can be accessed at https://www.mmwiss.org/events/maria-mitchell-women-of-science-symposium.

Keep an eye on their website for updates at https://www.mmwiss.org/

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Meet Your CSWA, James Keane

James Keane is a research scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is a planetary scientist, studying orbital dynamics, rotational dynamics, and geologic processes on terrestrial and icy worlds across the Solar System utilizing data from NASA's robotic missions (GRAIL, New Horizons, etc.). James is also an avid artist and science communicator, using pen and pencil to communicate complicated scientific ideas.

 

 

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

A female Ph.D. student’s cautionary tale and the need for peer mentorship

By Bárbara Cruvinel Santiago

In 2018, I moved to NYC to attend my Physics Ph.D. program at Columbia. Life was far from perfect due to personal and family issues, political turmoil in my home country, being away from my loved ones, and a much less than ideal new housing situation. After working for a year, however, I was looking forward to going back to school. Given my track record, getting my B.S. in Physics at Yale under a full-ride need-based scholarship, and working for a year at MIT’s Nobel-prize-winning LIGO lab, I thought I was up for the challenge, but grad school turned out to be different from anything I had ever encountered.

Friday, August 14, 2020

AASWOMEN Newsletter for August 14, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 14, 2020
eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson, Jeremy Bailey, and Alessandra Aloisi

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. --eds.]

This week's issues:

1. Recap: Virtual CSWA Meet and Greet @ the 236th AAS Meeting

2. Women's in-class participation, performance increase with more female peers, instructors

3. NSF grant changes raise alarm about commitment to basic research

4. Frances Allen, first woman to win Turing Award for contributions to computing, dies at 88

5. Astropy call for funding proposals for inclusion, diversity, and empowerment

6. Virginia T. Norwood: The Mother of Landsat

7. Remembrance of Joan Feynman

8. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine seeking experts for study on equity and inclusion

9. Beyond Pink Microscopes: How Two Researchers are Changing the Culture of Science

10. Conferences failing to protect LGBT+ researchers: Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion at meetings requires more than a code of conduct, analysis finds

11. Five tips for boosting diversity on campus

12. Senior U.S. lawmaker wants National Academies to scrutinize racism in science

13. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

15. Access to Past Issues

Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Recap: Virtual CSWA Meet and Greet @ the 236th AAS Meeting

Drawing on community input from a brief survey, our panel focused on addressing the special challenges our community faces, especially in the era of social distancing and social unrest. Recognizing that women can identify along multiple axes, the CSWA invited representatives from the AAS diversity committee to participate on this panel. Panelists were Dr. Jackie Monkiewicz (Working Group on Accessibility and Disability, WGAD), Dra. Nicole Cabrera Salazar (Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy, CSMA), and Dr. Rolf Danner (Committee for Sexual-Orientation & Gender Minorities on Astronomy, SGMA). Dr. Stella Kafka (CSWA) moderated.

In support of Black Lives Matter, the Meet and Greet started with a moment of silence to reflect on the episodes of social injustice that were occurring at the time of the meeting (early June 2020). Subsequently, posts that highlight the work of Black astronomers were (and will continue to be) cross-posted on the CSWA blog page.

The panel discussions centered around three topics: work-life balance, supporting each other, and making on-line meetings inclusive. What follows are comments from the participants on the panel, including the moderator. A link to the CSWA Resources page is included at the end.

Friday, August 7, 2020

AASWomen Newsletter for August 7, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 7, 2020
eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson, Jeremy Bailey, and Alessandra Aloisi

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. --eds.]

This week's issues:

1. Women in Space Seminar Series Episode 3: Lack of Representation and Systemic Racism in Academia  
2. 51 Pegasi b Fellowship 
3. NASA ExoPAG, SAG22: A Target Star Archive for Exoplanet Science
4. Ben Barres Fellowship
5. ‘It’s like we’re going back 30 years’: how the coronavirus is gutting diversity in science  
6. The pandemic is hitting scientist parents hard, and some solutions may backfire 
7.  Language may undermine women in science and tech
8. The 'female' brain: why damaging myths about women and science keep coming back in new forms
9. Job Opportunities
10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

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Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Meet Your CSWA, Jeremy Bailin

Jeremy Bailin is an Associate Professor at the University of Alabama. His research involves galaxy formation using computer simulations, observations in the optical and radio, and phenomenological models. He is particularly interested in the outskirts of galaxies — stellar halos, circumgalactic medium, globular clusters, and satellite galaxies. He teaches courses from introductory astronomy to graduate astrophysics, and is involved in astronomy education research.

Jeremy joined the CSWA in 2019, and is particularly interested in how the CSWA’s mission plays out in university education (particularly in mid-range size institutions, where the most undergraduates encounter astronomy), and in LGBT+ issues.