Friday, May 17, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 17, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 17, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks. Twitter: @AAS_Women, Facebook: https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Director Lori Glaze; Image Credit: NASA, from item 4
This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

2. Reflections on Ethics at the AAS

3. Modern Women in STEM Book Project

4. Women are now in charge of NASA's science missions

5. NASA’s initiative to put a woman on the Moon is named Artemis, after Apollo’s twin sister

6. Women in Kyrgyzstan are fighting sexism by joining the space race

7. How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels

8. Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

9. Commentary: The problematic media portrayals of women in science

10. Women gifted in math are still less likely than men to pursue it

11. Lawsuit Alleges Age, Race, Sex Discrimination At Mount Sinai Med School

12. 'I Don’t Want to Stay in a Country That Doesn’t Want Me As Badly as I Want It'

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

Panelists at the WiPS LPSC Networking Event
The Women in Planetary Science (WiPS) event at LPSC (Lunary and Planetary Science Conference) in March commemorated the 50th LPSC by celebrating women scientists who have been in planetary science since the Apollo Era.

Read more about the event in a recent Women in Planetary Science blog post by Dr. Rajani Dhingra:

https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpress.com/2019/05/12/summary-from-the-wips-networking-event-at-lpsc-2019/

Friday, May 10, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 10, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 10, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.]
@AAS_Women Facebook

This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them

2. The largest study involving transgender people is providing long-sought insights about their health

3. Science Communication Workshop for Physical Sciences

4. Bonus: Talking Feminist Astrophysics with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

5. Decolonization and intersectionality in tech, with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

6. Arab women scientists call out gender discrimination in the workplace

7. Women in science are facing many of the same barriers, inequality, and discrimination that they did 300 years ago

8. Job Opportunities

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Cross-post: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them.

Credit: 500 Women Scientists
In January 2018, 500 Women Scientists launched the "Request a Woman Scientist" database. Over the past couple of weeks a number of articles have been written about the inspiring number of women who have signed up. As of this week, over 9,000 women have joined!

Read more at

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/female-scientists-start-database-showcase-work-9000-women-62781410

Articles about this database have also appeared on phys.org, The Business Journals, STAT, and The Scientist.

Friday, May 3, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 3, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 3, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride


[We have migrated the newsletter to a new mailing system. We thank you for your patience as we work through the issues. Please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. We continue to work on developing new instructions for subscribing and unsubscribing. --eds.]


This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers
2. National Academy of Sciences … Historic Number of Women Elected to Its Membership
3. An Engineering School With Half of Its Leadership Female? How Did That Happen?
4. Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies 
5. Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants 
6. Maria Kirch was the first woman to discover a comet, but her husband took the credit
7. Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings 
8. Job Opportunities
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers

U.S. National Academies of Sciences
"Breaking with their 156-year history, members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today voted overwhelmingly in favor of amending the elite organization’s bylaws to allow ejection of members who breach the group’s new Code of Conduct, which outlines offenses including sexual harassment. Historically, membership in NAS has been an honor conferred for life." In a recent article in Science, Meredith Wadman discussed the vote which occurred this week at the NAS's annual business meeting. This vote only polled those who attended the meeting and is not final. All academy members will be given the opportunity to vote in the coming months.

Read more about the background of this change and the happenings of the meeting here:

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/lopsided-vote-us-science-academy-backs-move-eject-sexual-harassers

Many others have covered this story including Nature and The Verge

Friday, April 26, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for April 26, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 26, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated the mailing list for this newsletter to Mailman. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Current subscribers will continue to receive their newsletter issues through the existing email listserv until their subscriptions are ported to the new system. No action on their part is needed. Please follow us on social media for updates:
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Image Credit: Corey Gray, from item 1
This week's issues:

1. Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

2. Meet the Mother-Son Duo Translating Astrophysics Into Blackfoot

3. 'This is the tip of the iceberg': More than 8,500 women have joined the 500 Women Scientists database

4. Where are the Black Women in STEM Leadership?

5. Sexual harassment is pervasive in US physics programmes

6. Program Aims to Train South African Girls in Science Fields

7. Power Of The Pack: Women Who Support Women Are More Successful

8. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

Editor's Note: We are reposting this announcement and extending the survey deadline to May 3. The CSWA is interested to hear from our community what activities should be prioritized as we move into the 2020s. Please respond and remember to share the survey with your colleagues. Thanks to all those who have responded already!

The survey can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/YEgYoTP4fKVtrSkx1

From the CSWA

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) began an effort to gather information about what are seen by our communities as the areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s.  The goal is to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers that will be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on an activity, project, or state of the profession consideration and to (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s.

Our strategy has been to first identify the key areas and potential activities that could be undertaken in these areas by the AAS, its divisions, or relevant committees. We have taken all the input we have received so far and created a survey based on that information.  Now we need you, the members of the communities the AAS and its divisions serve, to tell us which of the many wonderful activities and ideas that have been brought to our attention that you think will have the most impact and/or are the most important to focus on! (And tell us about anything we’ve missed!)  The survey is organized around 4 key areas: Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics, and also provides an opportunity to provide additional feedback and suggestions.  The more input we have from you, the better we can plan to advocate for you and serve you!  So please take a few minutes to contribute your input – we can’t do it without you!  

The survey is completely confidential and anonymous– we are not gathering any personally identifiable information, nor are we capturing any information on who is accessing the survey. We estimate it will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the evaluation of the activities in the four subtopics. There are additional open-ended questions and room for suggestions that are optional to address in as much or as little detail as the respondent wishes. The survey will be open until Friday, May 3, 2019.  It can be accessed at:

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Friday, April 19, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for April 19, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 19, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Current subscribers will continue to receive their newsletter issues through the existing email listserv until their subscriptions are ported to the new system. No action on their part is needed. Please follow us on social media for updates.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of]


This week's issues:

1. La Serena School for Data Science Application Deadline Extended

2. The Scientist Who Cooks Up the Skies of Faraway Worlds

3. #MeToo controversy erupts at archaeology meeting

4. Ten simple rules towards healthier research labs

5. How indigenous expertise improves science: the curious case of shy lizards and deadly cane toads

6. Boston University fires geologist found to have harassed women in Antarctica

7. Extraordinary Females Who Had The World’s “Firsts” In Sciences

8. It matters who we champion in science

9. Male scientists are often cast as lone geniuses. Here’s what happened when a woman was.

10. How Work-Family Justice Can Bring Balance to Scientist Moms

11. Want black women students to stay in STEM? Help them find role models who look like them

12. Who Was Hedwig Kohn? Facts About The Pioneering Physicist Celebrated In Google Doodle

13. Female Scientists Respond to Discovery's New Campaign in The Best Way

14. ‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’

15. 80 nations set quotas for female leaders. Should the U.S. be next?

16. Doctoral Students Charge Insufficient Support for Cultural Affinity Groups in Proposal

17. Job Opportunities

18. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

19. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

20. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Friday, April 12, 2019

AAS Women Newsletter for April 12, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 12, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues:
From item 2: Katie Bouman

1. Highlights from Women In Space 2019
2. Multiple stories about Katie Bouman and the first black hole image
3. Meet Maria Mitchell the First American to Discover a Comet
4. Women in Physics and Astronomy, 2019
5. Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
6. Dem senators introduce bill to combat sexual harassment in STEM
7. BethAnn McLaughlin: ‘Too many women in science have to run the gauntlet of abuse and leave’
8. Stepping up to be a role model for LGBTQ inclusion in science
9. It's So Damn Hard to Be a Mom in STEM and This New Attrition Stat Proves It
10. Paid Family Leave for Postdocs
11. Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2018 Literature
12. 10 Unusual Tips For How To Advance Women In STEM, National Academy Of Sciences
13. Barring Women From Economics
14. Multiple Factors Converge to Influence Women's Persistence in Computing: A Qualitative Analysis
15. Job opportunities
16. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
17. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
18. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Highlights from Women In Space 2019

By Kathryn Powell

Kathryn E. Powell, Ph.D. is a planetary scientist studying ancient Martian environments with remote sensing and the MSL Curiosity rover. She is currently a postdoctoral scholar at Northern Arizona University and Arizona State University.

Editor's Note: This is one of a series of recaps of the Women in Space conference. Each will feature the viewpoint of someone at a different career stage.

The Women in Space Conference was held February 7 and 8th at Arizona State University’s Skysong facility in Scottsdale, Arizona. The meeting brought together planetary scientists, astronomers, engineers, educators, and others under one roof to discuss a similarly diverse set of topics. The conference format was single-track, which mostly effective at keeping all the attendees in the same room for sessions within and outside of our respective fields. The schedule during the main conference days was distributed between keynotes, panel discussions, and clusters of shorter talks. The latter were nominally eight minutes in duration, although that time limit frequently went flying by during the speaker’s methods section.

Friday, April 5, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for April 5, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
April 5, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Guide to Organizing Inclusive Scientific Meetings
2. Town Hall Webinar: Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics
3. Deadline Extended: NASA Planetary Science Summer Seminar
4. 10 Unusual Tips For How To Advance Women In STEM, National Academy Of Sciences
5. NASEM Report: Preventing Sexual Harassment
6. Mixed messages about women’s representation in science—and a missing piece of the picture
7. 32 Women Who’ve Changed Life As We Know It 
8. The Failure of NASA’s Spacewalk SNAFU? How Predictable it Was
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Cross-post: Guide to Organizing Inclusive Scientific Meetings

Credit: Benjamin Couprie, Institut International de
Physique de Solvay. Featured in Nature.
"Scientific meetings can be invigorating, promote the exchange of ideas, foster new collaborations, and provide opportunities to reconnect with existing colleagues.

However, not all scientists have positive experiences when they attend scientific meetings. Some members of our scientific communities are left out (intentionally or otherwise)...."

This thoughtful and thorough meeting guide from 500 Women Scientists addresses a number of issues to consider when planning a meeting. It includes discussion of guiding principles and planning goals for organizers.

Read the guide at:

https://500womenscientists.org/inclusive-scientific-meetings

The meeting guide was also highlighted this week in Nature:

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01022-y

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

Editor's Note: We are reposting this announcement as we get closer to the April 23 survey deadline. The CSWA is interested to hear from our community what activities should be prioritized as we move into the 2020s. Please respond and remember to share the survey with your colleagues.

The survey can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/YEgYoTP4fKVtrSkx1

From the CSWA

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) began an effort to gather information about what are seen by our communities as the areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s.  The goal is to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers that will be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on an activity, project, or state of the profession consideration and to (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s.

Our strategy has been to first identify the key areas and potential activities that could be undertaken in these areas by the AAS, its divisions, or relevant committees. We have taken all the input we have received so far and created a survey based on that information.  Now we need you, the members of the communities the AAS and its divisions serve, to tell us which of the many wonderful activities and ideas that have been brought to our attention that you think will have the most impact and/or are the most important to focus on! (And tell us about anything we’ve missed!)  The survey is organized around 4 key areas: Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics, and also provides an opportunity to provide additional feedback and suggestions.  The more input we have from you, the better we can plan to advocate for you and serve you!  So please take a few minutes to contribute your input – we can’t do it without you!  

The survey is completely confidential and anonymous– we are not gathering any personally identifiable information, nor are we capturing any information on who is accessing the survey. We estimate it will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the evaluation of the activities in the four subtopics. There are additional open-ended questions and room for suggestions that are optional to address in as much or as little detail as the respondent wishes. The survey will be open until Tuesday, April 23, 2019.  It can be accessed at:

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Friday, March 22, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for March 22, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 22, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi (guest ed.)

Today's guest editor is Alessandra Aloisi. Alessandra studies stars and gas in nearby star-forming galaxies with UV/optical/NIR imaging and UV/optical spectroscopy to infer their chemical and evolutionary state. She received her PhD from Bologna University (Italy) in 1999. She then landed in the US and launched her career as postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and as associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. Alessandra joined the research staff at STScI in 2003, working first for the European Space Agency (ESA) and transferring to a position with the Association of the Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in 2009. At STScI, Alessandra started as instrument scientist for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and became the lead for the team responsible for the calibration, operations, and user support of these spectrographs just before the Hubble Servicing Mission 4. She then moved to be the Deputy Division Head of the Operations & Engineering Division, and is now the Head of the Science Mission Office where she oversees the science career and infrastructure of STScI as well as HST and JWST science policies.

This week's issues:

1. Women in Observatory Blog

2. The Case for Disciplining Faculty Harassers

3. Who invented the dishwasher, windshield wiper, caller ID? Women created these 50 inventions.

4. First person on Mars is likely to be a woman, NASA says

5. This Northern Va. student won the $250,000 prize in a top science competition

6. 7 books about women’s space history for women’s history month

7. The Woman who knows everything about the Universe

8. U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'

9. High-pressure research and a return to China: meet Haiyan Zheng

10. Study: U.S. gives less early-career research funding to women

11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Women in Observatory Blog

By Pascale Hibon
Image Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), C. Padilla

Although there are already one or more Women in Astronomy groups, life in observatories has different challenges, very specific to the exceptional character of the job: traveling for several days/weeks to remote places, working a night with only male colleagues/peers. The objectives of this blog are to collect, inform and support women experiencing life in Astronomical Observatories. Several women astronomers from worldwide observatories have already accepted to share their experience and different WIO profiles are published.

You can find the blog at: http://womeninobservatory.blogspot.com

If you wish to participate to this blog and/or if you want more information:
phibon_at_eso.org

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Astro2020 APC Notice of Intent due March 20, take CSWA Survey for 2020s Priorities

By Aparna Venkatesan

As a reminder, Astro2020: Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics has some deadlines coming up very soon! The science white papers were due March 11, and the Notice of Intent for the APC (activity, project, of state of the profession consideration) category is due March 20.

Please see the National Academy of Sciences site for Astro2020:
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/CurrentProjects/SSB_185159

The NOI form for the APC white papers is here:
https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4829893/Astro2020-NOI-form

NOIs can be targeted and brief. To the best of our knowledge, white papers will be accepted in July without a submitted NOI, but submitting an NOI will help the decadal survey committees and working groups gauge and plan for the topics and anticipated volume of submissions.

Full APC papers can be 5-10 pages long and have a tentative due date of July 1. The NAS site states that the exact format will be announced soon.

We encourage our community members to strongly consider having their voices and priorities for the next decade heard through white paper submissions, especially our junior, female and/or underrepresented minority professionals and those served by AAS diversity committees. Please do suggest actionable recommendations in the white paper(s) you submit, as this would be most useful for funding agencies and institutions.

For slides with an overview of the nature and process of the decadal survey from Dara Norman, please see here

And last - please take the CSWA survey on our community needs in the 2020s (https://goo.gl/forms/YEgYoTP4fKVtrSkx1). This will help the CSWA develop one or more white papers for Astro2020 and create a new strategic plan for the 2020s for CSWA.

Thursday, March 7, 2019

More Women are Earning Doctorates in Science, Engineering, and Health But There’s Still Work To Do

This graph shows the fraction of U.S. doctoral degrees awarded
to women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
(STEM) fields. The data include both U.S. citizens/residents and
temporary residents. Source: IPEDS and APS.
By Nicolle Zellner and JoEllen McBride

The National Science Foundation released a report this month with the headline “Number of Women with U.S. Doctorates in Science, Engineering, or Health Employed in the United States More Than Doubles since 1997.” The editors of the AASWOMEN Newsletter decided to take a closer look at the numbers and unpack this title to see where women stand in the science, engineering, or health (SEH) doctorate landscape. The short answer: employed women with PhDs are generally still in the minority.

Table 2 of the article reports the data by “broad occupation and sex”. In this table, the actual numbers of “employed U.S.-trained SEH doctorate holders residing in the United States” in both 1997 and 2017 are compared to each other. In short, the percentage of all female PhDs employed in science and engineering (S&E) occupations increased by 10.8% between 1997 and 2017.
  • Females with PhDs in biological, agricultural and other life sciences showing the greatest gain (14%).
  • Females with PhDs employed in the physical and related sciences rose by 10.7%.
  • Females with PhDs employed as computer scientists saw the smallest gain (4%).
Other occupations tell a more promising story. The percentage of employed females with PhDs in S&E related occupations (e.g., health-related occupations, S&E managers, S&E pre-college teachers, and S&E technicians and technologists) rose by 16.5%, with social scientists close behind (16.4%). The percentage of those with PhDs employed as psychologists rose by 12.5%, and women now make up almost 60% of all psychologists, outnumbering the men. According to the article, “female early career doctorate holders were more likely than their comparison group of men to report professional services (e.g., health care, counseling, financial services, legal services) as their primary work activity (12% versus 6%, [Table 4]). Some of these differences in primary work activities between men and women, regardless of career stage, may be associated with differences in their broad occupational categories and sectors of employment.”

Table 4, which shows primary work activities, is also interesting. Women report that they are employed in about one-third of all research and development work in 2017, compared to just one-fifth in 1997. Women are also gaining in the areas of teaching: Men used to hold more teaching positions than women, and the numbers are closer now.  Whether or not this translates to tenure-track positions is unknown, but unlikely. According to data compiled by the Chronicle of Higher Education on faculty pay in 2017, women still make up a majority of assistant professors, instructors, and lecturers. Overall, between 1998 and 2016 the number of full-time faculty at postsecondary institutions increased by 38% while the number of part-time faculty increased by 74% between 1998 and 2011, then decreased by 4% between 2011 and 2016. Between 1975 and 2011, part-time faculty went from being 30% of faculty to 51% while full-time tenure and tenure-track faculty saw a 16% and 11% decrease over the same time. A 2009 survey by the National Center for Education Statistics reported that women make up 51% of all adjunct faculty, while a smaller survey (N~20,000) conducted by an adjunct group called the Coalition on the Academic Workforce put the proportion of female adjunct faculty at closer to 61%. So not only are institutions relying more heavily on part-time faculty, it’s possible that women are also more likely to be given those part-time positions.

Despite the gains in S&E PhD employment for women, significant as they are, the percentage of those with PhDs employed in non-S&E occupations rose by 17.5%, more than all of the S&E occupations, related or actual.

We recognize that an increase in the number of women with SEH doctorates employed in the U.S. is progress, but that doesn’t mean our work is done. Women still do not hold as many management positions as men and they make up a larger portion of part-time and non-tenured populations. A shift in culture is necessary to make places of employment more welcoming and supportive of working women including, but not limited to better parental leave policies, changing the assumption that duties requiring “soft skills” are better handled by women, institutions taking steps to eliminate bias in their hiring process, and promoting women to more senior positions. The APS also showed that although the number of women earning doctorates in the sciences was steadily increasing between 1975 and 2009, its leveled off since. We hope that these numbers will encourage institutions to continue to work towards equity and inclusivity until the barriers that prevent women and people diverse in gender, race, sexuality, and ability from making their contributions to SEH fields.

The AASWomen Editors thank Rick Fienberg, AAS Press Officer, for bringing this article to our attention.

Friday, March 1, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for March 1, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
March 1, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues:  

1. Does your conference spark joy? Two days at Women in Space 2019 
2. NASA Renames Facility to Honor 'Hidden Figures' Subject Katherine Johnson
3. Announcing the 11th Annual Susan Niebur WiPS Networking Event – LPSC 2019 
4. Conferences on General Relativity, Gravitation, and Gravitational Waves
5. Deaf Students Feel the Universe’s Vibrations in New Workshop
6. When Pioneers Disappear from History 
The Tower of the Moon and the Stars,
built by Queen Sonduk (632 CE).
Image by Gabriella Bernardi.
7. How some men are challenging gender inequity in the lab
8. 18 Children's Books About Female Scientists, Because STEM-inism Is The Future
9.  The unforgotten sisters: Sonduk, the astronomer queen
10. Job Opportunities   
11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter 



Thursday, February 28, 2019

Does your conference spark joy? Two days at Women in Space 2019

Group photo from Women in Space 2019
By Adeene Denton

Adeene Denton is a Presidential Fellow pursuing her PhD at Brown University in planetary geoscience, with a focus on early martian climatic and geologic history as well as basin formation on Pluto. She is both a scientist and a historian focused on approaching future planetary exploration from a scientific and humanistic perspective.

Editor's Note: This is one of a series of recaps of the Women in Space conference. Each will feature the viewpoint of someone at a different career stage.

On February 7 and 8, 2019, I returned to the Women in Space conference for its second year of programming. In its inaugural outing in Toronto, I found Women in Planetary Science and Exploration (as it was then called) to be a conference experience unlike any other. Scientists, engineers, humanities scholars, and educators were all welcomed to the space as valued contributors to our discussion. Now in its second year and in a new venue in Scottsdale, Arizona, Women in Space has grown and improved while continuing to be one of the only conferences of its kind: a conference where the experiences of women and non-binary people dictate the programming, rather than having programming made for us by an institution that bears us only a passing, cursory interest. And while no conference is ever perfect, I’m here not to critique Women in Space, but to praise it. I want to talk about the critical things it’s getting right, because it’s the only conference I’ve attended that has done so.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

From the CSWA

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) began an effort to gather information about what are seen by our communities as the areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s.  The goal is to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers that will be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on an activity, project, or state of the profession consideration and to (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s.

Our strategy has been to first identify the key areas and potential activities that could be undertaken in these areas by the AAS, its divisions, or relevant committees. We have taken all the input we have received so far and created a survey based on that information.  Now we need you, the members of the communities the AAS and its divisions serve, to tell us which of the many wonderful activities and ideas that have been brought to our attention that you think will have the most impact and/or are the most important to focus on! (And tell us about anything we’ve missed!)  The survey is organized around 4 key areas: Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics, and also provides an opportunity to provide additional feedback and suggestions.  The more input we have from you, the better we can plan to advocate for you and serve you!  So please take a few minutes to contribute your input – we can’t do it without you!  

The survey is completely confidential and anonymous– we are not gathering any personally identifiable information, nor are we capturing any information on who is accessing the survey. We estimate it will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the evaluation of the activities in the four subtopics. There are additional open-ended questions and room for suggestions that are optional to address in as much or as little detail as the respondent wishes. The survey will be open until Tuesday, April 23, 2019.  It can be accessed at:

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Cross-post: The Women Who Contributed to Science but Were Buried in Footnotes

From the Atlantic article (Bettmann/Getty)
"In science, the question of who gets credit for important work—fraught in any field—is set down on paper, for anyone to see. Authorship, given pride of place at the top of scientific papers, can advance reputations and careers; credits buried in the rarely read acknowledgments section do not."

In the Atlantic article, The Women Who Contributed to Science but Were Buried in Footnotes, Ed Yong highlights a team of students led by Emilia Huerta-Sánchez and Rori Rohlfs who searched through decades of acknowledgements in Theoretical Population Biology and discovered that many women were not given the authorships that would be expected for today's researchers.

Read more at:

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/womens-history-in-science-hidden-footnotes/582472/ 

Friday, February 8, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for February 8, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 08, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[It’s Black History Month! This issue features some resources for including astronomers and physicists of color in your lectures and talks. --eds.]

This week's issues:

1. AAS Public Policy Office Post-Shutdown Town Hall Updates

2. Cross-post: The Woman Who Sees Space First

3. AAWIP Lists African American Women with PhDs Who Identify as Physicists

4. NSBP Black History Month Physics Profiles

5. Gladys West's work on GPS 'would impact the world'

6. Rosalind Franklin: Mars rover named after DNA pioneer

7. This is how science can fix its glaring gender inequality problem

8. Keynote Speaker added to NASEM Symposium Highlighting Evidence-Based Interventions to Address the Underrepresentation of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine

9. Grad Students in STEM Talk Lab Culture Issues at Union-Led Discussion

10. The History of Women in Sci-Fi Isn’t What You Think

11. Job Opportunities

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Cross-post: The Woman Who Sees Space First

A recent Medium article by Shannon Stirone profiles Candice Hansen-Koharcheck. Candice has been been working with ground-breaking images from a series of iconic spacecraft for over 40 years. “To me, these places have gone from being points of light in the sky to being real places,” Hansen-Koharcheck says.

Read more at:

Friday, February 1, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for February 1, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
February 1, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues: 
Image Credit: Shayanne Gal/Business Insider (August 2018)


1. From young to youthful - the challenges of mid-career  
2. Interviews with Scientist on “Person Place Thing”  
3. Q&A: Pulsar pioneer Jocelyn Bell Burnell
4. Scientists’ salary data highlight US$18,000 gender pay gap
5. How gender disparities in salary add up over a lifetime
6. To learn inclusion skills, make it personal
7. To Groom Better Scientists, Harness the Power of Narrative
8. It’s Time to Rethink Who’s Best Suited for Space Travel 
9. Celebrate the women behind the periodic table
10. Job Opportunities   
11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, January 31, 2019

From young to youthful - the challenges of mid-career

By Orsola De Marco

Orsola De Marco is an Astrophysicists working at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. She is Italian born, but complete her degrees at University College London. She spent the better part of a decade at the American Museum of Natural History, where she worked in research as well as Astronomy documentaries. 

Walking the tight rope takes a lot of training. Even more so if the walker carries two suitcases, and is balancing a ball on her nose. It is hard but it can be done with some innate ability and the right encouragement. And so the walker takes her first few steps, to the applause of the audience. But as her pace picks up, now steady and confident, the audience starts to leave, the encouragement wanes and she realises that she is not yet on the other side. Not by a long way. Then the wind strengthens and the suitcases are feeling heavier. Though experienced, she now has to figure out a new set of tricks to keep her balance.

In one’s mid-career, having achieved some measure of success (a job, even professor title) things are by no means slowing down or getting easier. There are still very large and growing expectations of maintaining a certain level of research, teaching and administration. And while these expectations grow, the kids, who for a few years have been easier, older, more independent, turn into teens, with teen problems. And the ageing parents who were helpful, turn into … kids. And suddenly life and work become a new match of some well-known game where the rules have been altered, like a professional soccer player, placed in a game of bubble football, where skill is sabotaged by grotesque obstacles.