Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Your Memories of Dr. Margaret Burbidge

AP Photo | Annie Gracy [CC BY-SA 4.0] via Wikimedia Commons

In 1971, Margaret Burbidge refused to accept the AAS Council's Cannon Prize because "the prize, available only to women, was in itself discriminatory." The Council's response was to set up a committee, the "Special Committee on the Cannon Prize," which not only dealt with this issue but also recommended that the AAS review the status of women in astronomy. These events were the catalyst that started the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA).

On her 100th Birthday, August 12, the CSWA would like the community to share their memories of the astronomer who verified nucleosynthesis in stars, measured redshifts to some of the first quasars, and helped develop the Faint Object Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope--among many other accomplishments. Please use the form below to reminisce. There is space to leave your name, institution, and job title, but these are not required. Your memories will be posted on the CSWA Women in Astronomy Blog on August 12 and shared with Dr. Burbidge.

Submit your memories at

https://forms.gle/s56ELEjHzsHz3VEaA

Friday, July 12, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for July 12, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 12, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women, Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of]

This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: Pre-registration Open for the Inclusive Astronomy 2 Conference
2. Register now to watch the first Astro2020 steering committee meeting!
3. Education Professional Development Mini-Grant Opportunity Now Open
4. Women are less supportive of space exploration – getting a woman on the Moon might change that
5. Astronaut Barbie has landed, and it’s one giant leap for women in STEM 
ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti
and her Barbie (stylist.co.uk image)
6. How a decision-analysis tool helped one scientist couple make some tough career choices
7. These young scientists will shape the next 50 years of Moon research  
8. Queer voices in palaeontology  
9. How I lost my identity — and embraced a new one
10. Why Men Thought Women Weren’t Made to Vote
11. Who gets grant money? The (gendered) words decide.
12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Monday, July 8, 2019

Crosspost: Pre-registration Open for the Inclusive Astronomy 2 Conference

It has been four years since the 2015 Nashville Inclusive Astronomy meeting, an event that brought astronomers together with sociologists, policy makers, and leaders in the field to discuss issues affecting underrepresented groups in astronomy. The Nashville Recommendations, which emphasize equity and intersectionality, build upon a rich history of work to broaden participation and improve climates.

We now have the opportunity to bring together the astronomy community to discuss the current state of the profession and make recommendations for the 2020s and beyond. Specifically, we will discuss community expectations on inclusivity and representation, evaluate our progress towards meeting equity goals, and address the needs of marginalized groups in the workforce. We will advance these broad goals by focusing on barriers in professional development (e.g., training, jobs, promotion, tenure) and barriers to accessing resources (e.g., funding, telescopes, facilities, data).

Friday, July 5, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for July 5, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 05, 2019

eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Shawn Hitchcock (center) works with graduate students Fatima Olayemi Obe (left) and Marian Aba Addo, see item 4


This week's issues:

1. The Advocacy Axis

2. NASA changes how it divvies up telescope time to reduce gender bias

3. At 21, Ann Montgomery Became a Lead Engineer at NASA, Managing the Cameras and Other Crucial Gear Used on the Moon

4. Making invisible work in STEM more visible

5. Women feel inferior and less suited to Stem jobs than men

6. Katharine Gebbie

7. Unstoppable women: These 3 astronomy lovers will inspire you to reach for the stars

8. Teaching ingenuity

9. Job Opportunities

10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Monday, July 1, 2019

The Advocacy Axis

Adapted from a Plenary talk given at the 234th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

By Joan Schmelz, PhD

New high-profile sexual harassment cases continue to appear in the press almost daily. A few years ago, a cluster of these cases involved Astronomers. At the time, I decided to talk to the press, in part to help take the heat off of the Title IX complainants, several of whom wished to remain anonymous. Here’s one of my quotes from back then:

“We have to find a way to change the system - to take the pressure off the young women in the most vulnerable stages of their careers and shift it to the senior men, many of whom have admitted to knowing this ‘open secret’ for years if not decades.”

--Joan Schmelz (Oct 2015)

A strange thing happened as a result of that publicity. About a dozen senior male astronomers (individuals in our scientific community with the most privilege) sought me out to tell me that they had known about the harassment in one or more of these cases, but had never intervened. Here’s an abbreviated list of the reasons they gave for doing/saying nothing:

  • It was none of my business
  • I didn’t want to intrude
  • I didn’t know what to do
  • I thought I might make it worse
  • It’s not my problem
  • Boys will be boys

Friday, June 28, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for June 28, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 28, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: A fast-moving revolution: from Stonewall toward a more diverse scientific workforce

2. House Bill Seeks To Name Large Synoptic Survey Telescope For Astronomer Vera Rubin

3. Record-breaking Astronaut Peggy Whitson: ‘It’s an Exciting Time for Space Exploration’

4. Saydean Zeldin: Guiding Apollo’s engines

5. Elaine Denniston: The woman who corrected Apollo's code

6. It could take 118 years for female computer scientists to match publishing rates of male colleagues

7. People trust scientists, says landmark survey, but there are troubling trends

8. International Women in Engineering Day 2019: role models critical to women’s success

9. Richmond woman performs science experiment onstage, wins Miss Virginia 2019

10. AWIS Launches STEM Equity Community Platform with Elsevier's Support

11. What to Do When You’re the Only Woman in the Room

12. STEM Gap: No State Has More Women Than Men w/ Tech Degrees

13. Opinion: 10 Ways to Support New Mothers in STEM

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Crosspost: A fast-moving revolution: from Stonewall toward a more diverse scientific workforce

By Bruno da Rocha-Azevedo

June 2019 is a special year for the LGBTQ+ community. The Stonewall riots started the fight for gay rights in the United States. It can be seen as a collective “coming out” of people fighting to be recognized as they are. It was violent, and not a “fun event” as our Pride Parade is nowadays. However, the riots had a strong impact on society. One year later, Gay Pride marches started all over the nation, and each year gay rights has moved more and more towards equality. Every June, we should pay respect to and celebrate with pride these strong men and women who fought for our rights and who were the start of a fast-moving revolution.

Friday, June 21, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for June 21, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 21, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Sally Ride, from item 2
This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: Symposium in Honor of the Legacy of Vera Rubin

2. Sally Ride became the first American woman in space 36 years ago today

3. A Push For More Inclusivity In Science

4. US science agencies report ‘shockingly low’ rates of harassment complaints

5. NIH should ask both institutions and investigators to report sexual harassment findings, advisory group says

6. Unintended consequences of gender-equality plans

7. Psychology Today: It’s Not You, It’s Them

8. Where Are All the Working Mothers in STEM?

9. Making space for female scientists' voices online, in the media and in person

10. Why women in tech are being Photoshopped in instead of hired

11. What it's like to be a trans scientist with imposter syndrome - Lady Science

12. An interview with the CLEAR Lab’s Queer Science Reading Group

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Crosspost: Symposium in Honor of the Legacy of Vera Rubin

Credit: Carnegie Institution

Dr. Vera Rubin, who passed away in Dec. 2016, was one of the most important astrophysicists of the 20th and 21st centuries. She received her Ph.D. from Georgetown University in 1954, and pioneered the study of galaxy rotation rates that provided definitive evidence for the existence of Dark Matter. Dr. Rubin was also a fierce and effective advocate for women in science. This symposium to honor and celebrate her legacy brings together astrophysicists whose research was made possible by Dr. Rubin’s discoveries to present the latest developments in the field and discuss the connections with Dr. Rubin’s discoveries.

Other activities include a keynote lecture for the general public, a poster session for contributed posters, a workshop to address current issues facing women in science, including secondary school science teachers, and a visit to Capitol Hill to meet with members of Congress.

The Symposium will take place on the campus of Georgetown University and is jointly sponsored with Stockholm University, via the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, with additional support from the National Science Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and The Clare Booth Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation.

Read more about the Symposium and register at

https://sites.google.com/georgetown.edu/verarubinsymposium/home

Note: Registration closes today (June 20th) but you can still attend individual sessions. Refreshments are available for those who register. There are places nearby the campus to grab lunch.

Friday, June 14, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for June 14, 2019

Todd Mason, Mason Productions Inc. / LSST Corporation
AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 14, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women
Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

This week's issues:

1. Interview with Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz, Vera Rubin Presidential Chair for Diversity in Astronomy at UC Santa Cruz

2. Chairwoman Johnson and Rep. González-Colón Introduce the Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act

3. Vera Rubin: The Astronomer Who Brought Dark Matter to Light

4. NASA Honors 'Hidden Figures' in Street Renaming Ceremony Outside NASA Headquarters

5. All-woman team commands rock-zapping laser on Mars

6. Chairwoman Johnson’s Opening Statement for Hearing on Combating Sexual Harassment in Science

7. Time to End the Manel Tradition

8. When English is not your mother tongue

9. Eight Ways to Support Women in Science

10. 5 Ways Society Sabotages Girls' Interest In Science And Math

11. Job Opportunities

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Interview with Dr. Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Vera Rubin Presidential Chair for Diversity in Astronomy at UC Santa Cruz

Dr. Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, professor and chair of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, was inducted as the inaugural Vera Rubin Presidential Chair for Diversity in Astronomy last month. Vera Rubin was on the steering committee of the Working Group on the Status of Women in Astronomy whose report led to the creation of the AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy. She was also a champion of inclusive science—mentoring students from various backgrounds. I spoke to Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz about what this chair means and about his intentional work to increase the diversity of voices contributing to the field of astronomy.

Friday, June 7, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for June 7, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 6, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks. 
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of]

This week's issues:

1. AAS 234 Summer Meeting Sessions You Shouldn't Miss 
2. NAS Members Approve a Bylaw Amendment to Permit Rescinding Membership
3. Make reports of research misconduct public
4. 75 years after D-Day: Salinas woman, 98, served as military geologist during World War II
5. Astronomy Magazine: Women in the Apollo Program 
6. Tracking Down JoAnn Morgan, a Semi-Hidden Figure of U.S. Space History  
Astrophysicist Federica Bianco spends at
least an hour training in a boxing gym
everyday. (image by Alan Yu/WHYY)
7. Astrophysicist explains how boxing makes her a better scientist
8. Group devoted to combating sexual harassment in science is in turmoil as leaders exit 
9. Ph.D. programs drop standardized exam 
10. Use peer-to-peer research collaboration in graduate school
11. How I explained a gap in my CV when applying to graduate school
12. Racial and gender biases plague postdoc hiring
13. The Data Science Diversity Gap: Where Are the Women?
14. In Space, This Diverse Company Naturally Attracts Women: COO
15. These 12 Women Are Killing It in STEM Fields — and They Want You to Join Them
16. Job Opportunities
17. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
18. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
19. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, June 6, 2019

AAS 234 Summer Meeting Sessions You Shouldn't Miss

The summer meeting of the American Astronomical Society will take place Sunday, June 9 through Thursday, June 13 in St. Louis, MO. The CSWA has identified sessions that feature the various AAS diversity committees and may be of interest to readers of the blog.
  • Sunday, June 9, Student Orientation Reception & Grad School Fair, 5:30 pm-7:00 pm, Midway 6
  • Tuesday, June 11, SGMA Meet & Greet for LGBTQIA Members and Students, 6:30 pm–7:30 pm, Gothic Corridor
  • Wednesday, June 12, Career Panel: Diverse Careers in Astrophysics, 1:40 pm–2:40 pm, New York Room
  • Wednesday, June 12, CSWA Meet & Greet, 6:30 pm–7:30 pm, Midway 7&8
    The CSWA is excited to meet you and present preliminary results from our survey, discuss possible Decadal Survey white papers, and offer refreshments to those who join us!
  • Thursday, June 13, 400 Plenary Session: From Native Skywatchers to ASTR 101…New Designs for Interdisciplinary, Multidisciplinary, and Transdisciplinary Engaged Learning Now, Annette S. Lee (St. Cloud State University) and Cahokia Mounds: America’s First City, Bill Iseminger (Cahokia Mounds Historic Site), 8:30 am–9:20 am, Grand Ballroom DEF
We hope to see you there!

Friday, May 31, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 31, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 31, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi (guest ed.)

Today's guest editor is Alessandra Aloisi. Alessandra studies stars and gas in nearby star-forming galaxies with UV/optical/NIR imaging and UV/optical spectroscopy to infer their chemical and evolutionary state. She received her PhD from Bologna University (Italy) in 1999. She then landed in the US and launched her career as postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and as associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. Alessandra joined the research staff at STScI in 2003, working first for the European Space Agency (ESA) and transferring to a position with the Association of the Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in 2009. At STScI, Alessandra started as instrument scientist for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and became the lead for the team responsible for the calibration, operations, and user support of these spectrographs just before the Hubble Servicing Mission 4. She then moved to be the Deputy Division Head of the Operations & Engineering Division, and is now the Head of the Science Mission Office where she oversees the science career and infrastructure of STScI as well as HST and JWST science policies.

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of
]

This week's issues:

1. Maunakea Gender Equity and Inclusion Survey

2. The Hidden Heroines of Chaos

3. Commentary: Celebrating and supporting African American women in physics

4. 8 Tips For Generating Creative Ideas From The Mind Of A 'Genius' Woman Scientist

5. Astronomer Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz appointed to endowed chair for diversity in astronomy

6. Mary Sherman Morgan, The World’s First Woman Rocket Scientist

7. Eastern European universities score highly in university gender ranking

8. Commentary: Diversity in physics: Are you part of the problem?

9. I Am Fed Up With All-Male Panels. Here’s How We Change Them.

10. An astronomer’s poetic soul meets Dante’s scientific mind

11. 'Alien' turns 40: How the classic changed the game for women in action films

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Maunakea Gender Equity and Inclusion Survey

By Jessica Dempsey

Maunakea has the largest collective of astronomers in a single location - and the largest number of female scientists and engineers. After network and career building initiatives such as the women of Maunakea annual events - a survey was initiated to poll the demographics, experiences, and attitudes of the Observatories and astronomical institutes on the Hawaii islands to the challenges of equity and inclusion in our community.

Friday, May 24, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 24, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 24, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of
]

This week's issues:

1. Taking Over the Reins of the Women in Astronomy Blog

2. Gendered Observation: The Contribution of Women to the Astronomical Diaries of Mesopotamia

3. 18 Famous Women Who Explored Space

4. Looking at the State of Women in Engineering

5. What It's Like To Be An Asian American Woman In STEM Today

6. Why only 18% of data scientists are women

7. Twitter responses show sexual harassment is rife at academic conferences

8. The Disturbing Resilience of Scientific Racism

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Taking Over the Reins of the Women in Astronomy Blog

In the month of June, some of the members of the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) will be finishing their terms. This includes our Blogger-in-Chief, Cristina Thomas. Cristina served both as Blogger-in-Chief of the Women in Astronomy Blog and on the CSWA since 2016. She's done an amazing job highlighting news from the field that concerns astronomers who identify as women. We wish her all the best on her next endeavors.

Starting this week, I will be taking the reins from Cristina and posting weekly to the Women in Astronomy Blog. My name is JoEllen McBride and I am a CSWA member, avid science communicator, and partial astrophysicist. I communicate science in many ways, from writing blogs and news articles to giving talks to running workshops. I am thrilled to be continuing Cristina's work and taking on some of the new ideas we've discussed.

Among the first things I'd like to do is roll out exit interviews with the CSWA members that are stepping down. Hopefully, this will give our readers a better idea of what we do as a Committee (besides keeping up with the Blog). It's a brilliant idea of Cristina's and I'm excited to take this on! I also plan on bringing back the 'Meet Your CSWA' posts highlighting the remaining and incoming CSWA members. Finally, I am hoping to start a series that highlights the different paths we take on our journey to become astronomers. These diverse stories will highlight the many ways to become an astronomer as well as the various jobs you can do with the skills you learn. For example, I currently work for Penn Medicine Development and Alumni Relations as a Communications and Stewardship writer and know many astronomers who became data scientists or programmers for online courses and animation studios.

So, if you or someone you know has an interesting career path or you have ideas you want to share with our community that pertain to women in astronomy please reach out to joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com.

Friday, May 17, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 17, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 17, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks. Twitter: @AAS_Women, Facebook: https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Director Lori Glaze; Image Credit: NASA, from item 4
This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

2. Reflections on Ethics at the AAS

3. Modern Women in STEM Book Project

4. Women are now in charge of NASA's science missions

5. NASA’s initiative to put a woman on the Moon is named Artemis, after Apollo’s twin sister

6. Women in Kyrgyzstan are fighting sexism by joining the space race

7. How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels

8. Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

9. Commentary: The problematic media portrayals of women in science

10. Women gifted in math are still less likely than men to pursue it

11. Lawsuit Alleges Age, Race, Sex Discrimination At Mount Sinai Med School

12. 'I Don’t Want to Stay in a Country That Doesn’t Want Me As Badly as I Want It'

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

Panelists at the WiPS LPSC Networking Event
The Women in Planetary Science (WiPS) event at LPSC (Lunary and Planetary Science Conference) in March commemorated the 50th LPSC by celebrating women scientists who have been in planetary science since the Apollo Era.

Read more about the event in a recent Women in Planetary Science blog post by Dr. Rajani Dhingra:

https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpress.com/2019/05/12/summary-from-the-wips-networking-event-at-lpsc-2019/

Friday, May 10, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 10, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 10, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.]
@AAS_Women Facebook

This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them

2. The largest study involving transgender people is providing long-sought insights about their health

3. Science Communication Workshop for Physical Sciences

4. Bonus: Talking Feminist Astrophysics with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

5. Decolonization and intersectionality in tech, with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

6. Arab women scientists call out gender discrimination in the workplace

7. Women in science are facing many of the same barriers, inequality, and discrimination that they did 300 years ago

8. Job Opportunities

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Cross-post: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them.

Credit: 500 Women Scientists
In January 2018, 500 Women Scientists launched the "Request a Woman Scientist" database. Over the past couple of weeks a number of articles have been written about the inspiring number of women who have signed up. As of this week, over 9,000 women have joined!

Read more at

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/female-scientists-start-database-showcase-work-9000-women-62781410

Articles about this database have also appeared on phys.org, The Business Journals, STAT, and The Scientist.

Friday, May 3, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 3, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 3, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride


[We have migrated the newsletter to a new mailing system. We thank you for your patience as we work through the issues. Please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. We continue to work on developing new instructions for subscribing and unsubscribing. --eds.]


This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers
2. National Academy of Sciences … Historic Number of Women Elected to Its Membership
3. An Engineering School With Half of Its Leadership Female? How Did That Happen?
4. Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies 
5. Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants 
6. Maria Kirch was the first woman to discover a comet, but her husband took the credit
7. Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings 
8. Job Opportunities
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers

U.S. National Academies of Sciences
"Breaking with their 156-year history, members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today voted overwhelmingly in favor of amending the elite organization’s bylaws to allow ejection of members who breach the group’s new Code of Conduct, which outlines offenses including sexual harassment. Historically, membership in NAS has been an honor conferred for life." In a recent article in Science, Meredith Wadman discussed the vote which occurred this week at the NAS's annual business meeting. This vote only polled those who attended the meeting and is not final. All academy members will be given the opportunity to vote in the coming months.

Read more about the background of this change and the happenings of the meeting here:

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/lopsided-vote-us-science-academy-backs-move-eject-sexual-harassers

Many others have covered this story including Nature and The Verge

Friday, April 26, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for April 26, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 26, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated the mailing list for this newsletter to Mailman. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Current subscribers will continue to receive their newsletter issues through the existing email listserv until their subscriptions are ported to the new system. No action on their part is needed. Please follow us on social media for updates:
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Image Credit: Corey Gray, from item 1
This week's issues:

1. Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

2. Meet the Mother-Son Duo Translating Astrophysics Into Blackfoot

3. 'This is the tip of the iceberg': More than 8,500 women have joined the 500 Women Scientists database

4. Where are the Black Women in STEM Leadership?

5. Sexual harassment is pervasive in US physics programmes

6. Program Aims to Train South African Girls in Science Fields

7. Power Of The Pack: Women Who Support Women Are More Successful

8. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

Editor's Note: We are reposting this announcement and extending the survey deadline to May 3. The CSWA is interested to hear from our community what activities should be prioritized as we move into the 2020s. Please respond and remember to share the survey with your colleagues. Thanks to all those who have responded already!

The survey can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/YEgYoTP4fKVtrSkx1

From the CSWA

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) began an effort to gather information about what are seen by our communities as the areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s.  The goal is to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers that will be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on an activity, project, or state of the profession consideration and to (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s.

Our strategy has been to first identify the key areas and potential activities that could be undertaken in these areas by the AAS, its divisions, or relevant committees. We have taken all the input we have received so far and created a survey based on that information.  Now we need you, the members of the communities the AAS and its divisions serve, to tell us which of the many wonderful activities and ideas that have been brought to our attention that you think will have the most impact and/or are the most important to focus on! (And tell us about anything we’ve missed!)  The survey is organized around 4 key areas: Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics, and also provides an opportunity to provide additional feedback and suggestions.  The more input we have from you, the better we can plan to advocate for you and serve you!  So please take a few minutes to contribute your input – we can’t do it without you!  

The survey is completely confidential and anonymous– we are not gathering any personally identifiable information, nor are we capturing any information on who is accessing the survey. We estimate it will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the evaluation of the activities in the four subtopics. There are additional open-ended questions and room for suggestions that are optional to address in as much or as little detail as the respondent wishes. The survey will be open until Friday, May 3, 2019.  It can be accessed at:

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Friday, April 19, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for April 19, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 19, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Current subscribers will continue to receive their newsletter issues through the existing email listserv until their subscriptions are ported to the new system. No action on their part is needed. Please follow us on social media for updates.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of]


This week's issues:

1. La Serena School for Data Science Application Deadline Extended

2. The Scientist Who Cooks Up the Skies of Faraway Worlds

3. #MeToo controversy erupts at archaeology meeting

4. Ten simple rules towards healthier research labs

5. How indigenous expertise improves science: the curious case of shy lizards and deadly cane toads

6. Boston University fires geologist found to have harassed women in Antarctica

7. Extraordinary Females Who Had The World’s “Firsts” In Sciences

8. It matters who we champion in science

9. Male scientists are often cast as lone geniuses. Here’s what happened when a woman was.

10. How Work-Family Justice Can Bring Balance to Scientist Moms

11. Want black women students to stay in STEM? Help them find role models who look like them

12. Who Was Hedwig Kohn? Facts About The Pioneering Physicist Celebrated In Google Doodle

13. Female Scientists Respond to Discovery's New Campaign in The Best Way

14. ‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’

15. 80 nations set quotas for female leaders. Should the U.S. be next?

16. Doctoral Students Charge Insufficient Support for Cultural Affinity Groups in Proposal

17. Job Opportunities

18. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

19. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

20. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Friday, April 12, 2019

AAS Women Newsletter for April 12, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 12, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues:
From item 2: Katie Bouman

1. Highlights from Women In Space 2019
2. Multiple stories about Katie Bouman and the first black hole image
3. Meet Maria Mitchell the First American to Discover a Comet
4. Women in Physics and Astronomy, 2019
5. Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
6. Dem senators introduce bill to combat sexual harassment in STEM
7. BethAnn McLaughlin: ‘Too many women in science have to run the gauntlet of abuse and leave’
8. Stepping up to be a role model for LGBTQ inclusion in science
9. It's So Damn Hard to Be a Mom in STEM and This New Attrition Stat Proves It
10. Paid Family Leave for Postdocs
11. Women in Engineering: A Review of the 2018 Literature
12. 10 Unusual Tips For How To Advance Women In STEM, National Academy Of Sciences
13. Barring Women From Economics
14. Multiple Factors Converge to Influence Women's Persistence in Computing: A Qualitative Analysis
15. Job opportunities
16. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
17. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
18. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Highlights from Women In Space 2019

By Kathryn Powell

Kathryn E. Powell, Ph.D. is a planetary scientist studying ancient Martian environments with remote sensing and the MSL Curiosity rover. She is currently a postdoctoral scholar at Northern Arizona University and Arizona State University.

Editor's Note: This is one of a series of recaps of the Women in Space conference. Each will feature the viewpoint of someone at a different career stage.

The Women in Space Conference was held February 7 and 8th at Arizona State University’s Skysong facility in Scottsdale, Arizona. The meeting brought together planetary scientists, astronomers, engineers, educators, and others under one roof to discuss a similarly diverse set of topics. The conference format was single-track, which mostly effective at keeping all the attendees in the same room for sessions within and outside of our respective fields. The schedule during the main conference days was distributed between keynotes, panel discussions, and clusters of shorter talks. The latter were nominally eight minutes in duration, although that time limit frequently went flying by during the speaker’s methods section.

Friday, April 5, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for April 5, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
April 5, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Guide to Organizing Inclusive Scientific Meetings
2. Town Hall Webinar: Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics
3. Deadline Extended: NASA Planetary Science Summer Seminar
4. 10 Unusual Tips For How To Advance Women In STEM, National Academy Of Sciences
5. NASEM Report: Preventing Sexual Harassment
6. Mixed messages about women’s representation in science—and a missing piece of the picture
7. 32 Women Who’ve Changed Life As We Know It 
8. The Failure of NASA’s Spacewalk SNAFU? How Predictable it Was
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Cross-post: Guide to Organizing Inclusive Scientific Meetings

Credit: Benjamin Couprie, Institut International de
Physique de Solvay. Featured in Nature.
"Scientific meetings can be invigorating, promote the exchange of ideas, foster new collaborations, and provide opportunities to reconnect with existing colleagues.

However, not all scientists have positive experiences when they attend scientific meetings. Some members of our scientific communities are left out (intentionally or otherwise)...."

This thoughtful and thorough meeting guide from 500 Women Scientists addresses a number of issues to consider when planning a meeting. It includes discussion of guiding principles and planning goals for organizers.

Read the guide at:

https://500womenscientists.org/inclusive-scientific-meetings

The meeting guide was also highlighted this week in Nature:

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01022-y

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Repost: Facing the Future: The CSWA seeks your input on our community needs in the 2020s!

Editor's Note: We are reposting this announcement as we get closer to the April 23 survey deadline. The CSWA is interested to hear from our community what activities should be prioritized as we move into the 2020s. Please respond and remember to share the survey with your colleagues.

The survey can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/YEgYoTP4fKVtrSkx1

From the CSWA

During 2018 the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) began an effort to gather information about what are seen by our communities as the areas of key importance beyond scientific research that the AAS, its divisions, and its relevant committees (including the CSWA itself) should focus on as we move into the 2020s.  The goal is to use this information to (1) develop one or more white papers that will be submitted to the Decadal Survey as a part of the call for papers on an activity, project, or state of the profession consideration and to (2) develop a new strategic plan for the CSWA for the 2020s.

Our strategy has been to first identify the key areas and potential activities that could be undertaken in these areas by the AAS, its divisions, or relevant committees. We have taken all the input we have received so far and created a survey based on that information.  Now we need you, the members of the communities the AAS and its divisions serve, to tell us which of the many wonderful activities and ideas that have been brought to our attention that you think will have the most impact and/or are the most important to focus on! (And tell us about anything we’ve missed!)  The survey is organized around 4 key areas: Harassment and Bullying; Creating Inclusive Environments; Professional Development, Hiring, and Retention; and Professional Ethics, and also provides an opportunity to provide additional feedback and suggestions.  The more input we have from you, the better we can plan to advocate for you and serve you!  So please take a few minutes to contribute your input – we can’t do it without you!  

The survey is completely confidential and anonymous– we are not gathering any personally identifiable information, nor are we capturing any information on who is accessing the survey. We estimate it will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete the evaluation of the activities in the four subtopics. There are additional open-ended questions and room for suggestions that are optional to address in as much or as little detail as the respondent wishes. The survey will be open until Tuesday, April 23, 2019.  It can be accessed at:

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Friday, March 22, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for March 22, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 22, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi (guest ed.)

Today's guest editor is Alessandra Aloisi. Alessandra studies stars and gas in nearby star-forming galaxies with UV/optical/NIR imaging and UV/optical spectroscopy to infer their chemical and evolutionary state. She received her PhD from Bologna University (Italy) in 1999. She then landed in the US and launched her career as postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and as associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. Alessandra joined the research staff at STScI in 2003, working first for the European Space Agency (ESA) and transferring to a position with the Association of the Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in 2009. At STScI, Alessandra started as instrument scientist for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and became the lead for the team responsible for the calibration, operations, and user support of these spectrographs just before the Hubble Servicing Mission 4. She then moved to be the Deputy Division Head of the Operations & Engineering Division, and is now the Head of the Science Mission Office where she oversees the science career and infrastructure of STScI as well as HST and JWST science policies.

This week's issues:

1. Women in Observatory Blog

2. The Case for Disciplining Faculty Harassers

3. Who invented the dishwasher, windshield wiper, caller ID? Women created these 50 inventions.

4. First person on Mars is likely to be a woman, NASA says

5. This Northern Va. student won the $250,000 prize in a top science competition

6. 7 books about women’s space history for women’s history month

7. The Woman who knows everything about the Universe

8. U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'

9. High-pressure research and a return to China: meet Haiyan Zheng

10. Study: U.S. gives less early-career research funding to women

11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Women in Observatory Blog

By Pascale Hibon
Image Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), C. Padilla

Although there are already one or more Women in Astronomy groups, life in observatories has different challenges, very specific to the exceptional character of the job: traveling for several days/weeks to remote places, working a night with only male colleagues/peers. The objectives of this blog are to collect, inform and support women experiencing life in Astronomical Observatories. Several women astronomers from worldwide observatories have already accepted to share their experience and different WIO profiles are published.

You can find the blog at: http://womeninobservatory.blogspot.com

If you wish to participate to this blog and/or if you want more information:
phibon_at_eso.org