Friday, August 23, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for August 23, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 23, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi

This week's issues:

1. AAS Board Reflections: Adam Burgasser
2. What's Up With MeTooSTEM?
Bearded Lady Scientists
Image by Kelsey Vance (2017)
3. Ten simple rules for a successful remote postdoc 
4. Girls Who Code CEO: Men Need to Be Brave in the Service of Women 
5. Women in STEM college programs under attack for male discrimination 
6. Berkeley FEMALE profs wear BEARDS to protest alleged gender bias
7. If NASA Wants to Land the 1st Woman on the Moon, Her Spacesuit Better Fit
8. Why Equal Access to the Academic Stage is Still an Upward Battle
9. Peer reviewers need a code of conduct too
10. Job Opportunities
11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


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1. AAS Board Reflections: Adam Burgasser
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In order to familiarize the astronomy community with the AAS Board and encourage participation, the CSWA created a Reflection Survey for outgoing AAS Board members to complete after their terms ended in June. Over the coming weeks, we will feature the responses we've received on the Women in Astronomy blog. Enjoy!

Our first participant in our AAS Board Reflections project is Adam Burgasser, PhD. Dr. Burgasser is a professor in the department of Physics at UC San Diego, and an observational astrophysicist, whose research interests include the lowest mass stars, low-temperature brown dwarfs, and extrasolar planets. He also conducts research in Physics Education and Art-Science collaboratories. Adam received his PhD in Physics at Caltech, followed by a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellowship at UC Los Angeles, and a Spitzer Postdoctoral Fellowship at the American Museum of Natural History. He was on the faculty at MIT before coming to UC San Diego in 2009, where he directs the Cool Star Lab. Adam is committed to addressing inequities in Physics and Astronomy, and has served as member and Chair of the American Astronomical Society Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy …

Read more at


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2. What's Up With MeTooSTEM?
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Colleen Flaherty

"MeTooSTEM has accomplished much since it was founded in 2018 to fight sexual harassment in academic science. Since November alone, according to the group’s accounting, it has engaged with more than 750 individuals requesting assistance, filed hundreds of open-records requests about harassment cases and made dozens of complaints to funding agencies regarding researchers' conduct."

"But in recent days MeTooSTEM has been called out for how it responded to a request for help. And former members of the group have since renewed their criticism of MeTooSTEM’s priorities and of McLaughlin, a neuroscientist who was until July an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University. Others have predicted the group will fold. What’s up?"

Read more at


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3. Ten simple rules for a successful remote postdoc
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

In a recent article, Kevin Burgio (Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York) and colleagues offer advice on how to succeed in a remote postdoc position. The authors "offer 10 simple rules for overcoming challenges and leveraging the unique opportunities presented by remote postdoc positions" and "good practices for facilitating better communication both within labs more generally and in other long-distance collaborations."

Read more at


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4. Girls Who Code CEO: Men Need to Be Brave in the Service of Women
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Reshma Saujani

"Women are challenging incumbents up and down the ballot, banding together to demand action on gun violence, going undercover to fight misinformation online, pushing for consequences for perpetrators of sexual assault, organizing against laws restricting access to reproductive care.

And every so often, we stop to look for the men in the room. We scroll through our Twitter feeds, our group text threads, our email chains. We look for the ones who chimed in, took a stand, organized their workplaces or their communities."

Read more at


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5. Women in STEM college programs under attack for male discrimination
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Teresa Watanabe

"Female-only science programs, launched by many universities to redress gender imbalance in such fields as computer science and engineering, are coming under growing legal attack as sex discrimination against men.

The U.S. Department of Education has opened more than two dozen investigations into universities across the nation — UC Berkeley, UCLA and USC as well as Yale, Princeton and Rice — that offer female-only scholarships, awards, professional development workshops and even science and engineering camps for middle and high school girls. Sex discrimination in educational programs is banned under Title IX, a federal law that applies to all schools, both public and private, that receive federal funding."

Read more at


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6.  Berkeley FEMALE profs wear BEARDS to protest alleged gender bias
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

“Female paleontologists, including some from the University of California, Berkeley, are wearing fake beards to highlight alleged gender bias in their field..”

Read more at


Read about the “The Bearded Lady Project” at


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7. If NASA Wants to Land the 1st Woman on the Moon, Her Spacesuit Better Fit
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

"It's more than spacesuits not fitting female astronauts," said Saralyn Mark [founder and president of iGIANT and SolaMed Solutions LLC], referencing the canceled would-be all-female spacewalk from earlier this year. "We see the impact from the shoes and clothing we wear, the electronic devices we use, the cars we drive in and even the medications we take. Modifying appearances, or the 'pink it, shrink it' approach for gendered innovation will never work in any environment including space, battlefields, hot zones and in our homes."

Read more at

https://www.space.com/nasa-gender-specific-mike-pence-nsc.html


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8. Why Equal Access to the Academic Stage is Still an Upward Battle
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Sarah Wells

"“I remember one moment at a conference where I had just given a presentation and I had my young daughter with me,” Erica Bree Rosenblum, an associate professor of environmental science, policy, and management at UC Berkeley, recounted as part of a UC Davis video about Mothers in Science. “A senior colleague came up and said ‘that was a great presentation Bree, just make sure you don’t have another kid. Because that’ll kill your career.’”"

Read more at


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9. Peer reviewers need a code of conduct too 
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

“Initiatives to address bullying in science … should extend to the conduct of peer reviewers, particularly given the impact of toxic reviews on the mental health of researchers …

Learning to accept criticism is part of surviving the fierce competition in research. But an invitation to review the work of a peer, usually anonymously, is not a licence to patronize, intimidate or otherwise act in a way that would be unprofessional in the workplace. Such reviews are unnecessarily discouraging, particularly to an early-career researcher with limited experience of the system.”

Read more at


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10.  Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease 
  
Tenure-track Position, Astrophysics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Senior Software Engineer- Microservices - #0035997

Research Positions at STScI- Astronomer / Scientist Track combined #0036719

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org 

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address. 

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting. 

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

  
Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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