Friday, August 9, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for August 09, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 09, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

Rose O'Halloran, from item 2
This week's issues:

1. Summary of the Symposium Honoring Vera Rubin

2. 'Can teach men' - The story of Irish astronomer Rose O'Halloran

3. UW professor Ann Nelson remembered as brilliant physicist, advocate for diversity in science

4. Distinguished chemist Polly Arnold appointed as chemical sciences director at Berkeley Lab

5. How gender bias excludes women from international scientific collaboration

6. After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job

7. Student evaluations of teaching are not only unreliable, they are significantly biased against female instructors

8. Why we need to keep talking about equality in physics

9. Study suggests use of gender-neutral terms to describe people leads to gender equality

10. Job Opportunities

11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Summary of the Symposium Honoring Vera Rubin
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

A symposium honoring the legacy of Vera Rubin was held at Georgetown University June 24-26, 2019. Rubin, who passed away in 2016, was a pioneer in astronomy who used measurements of the rotation curves of galaxies to infer the presence of large amounts of matter out to their observed edges. She found that her measurements of the motion of stars around the centers of the galaxies implied the existence of an unknown type of matter, now called dark matter, in amounts exceeding that of the observed matter.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/08/summary-of-symposium-honoring-vera-rubin.html

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2. 'Can teach men' - The story of Irish astronomer Rose O’Halloran
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Jessica Traynor

"In 1895, Marie Evelyn, a journalist from the San Francisco Call was sent to interview an eccentric local figure, one Ms Rose O'Halloran, amateur astronomer, described as 'The woman with the pet telescope'."

Read more at

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/abroad/can-teach-men-the-story-of-irish-astronomer-rose-o-halloran-1.3975597?mode=amp

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3. UW professor Ann Nelson remembered as brilliant physicist, advocate for diversity in science
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Asia Fields

"Ann Nelson loved a challenge. From becoming an accomplished physicist in a field dominated by men to summiting mountains, Dr. Nelson spent her life focused on the next goal - and on giving others a hand along the way."

Read more at

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/obituaries/uw-professor-ann-nelson-remembered-as-brilliant-physicist-advocate-for-diversity-in-science

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4. Distinguished chemist Polly Arnold appointed as chemical sciences director at Berkeley Lab
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

"Distinguished heavy-element chemist Polly Arnold has been appointed as director of the Chemical Sciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, according to a recent press release from the lab.

Beginning in late September, Arnold will begin her work within the Energy Sciences Area at Berkeley Lab, and she will join the UC Berkeley chemistry department’s faculty in January 2020, according to the press release. "

Read more at

https://www.dailycal.org/2019/08/06/distinguished-chemist-polly-arnold-appointed-as-chemical-sciences-director-at-berkeley-lab

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5. How gender bias excludes women from international scientific collaboration
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

"As our world becomes increasingly interconnected, and as technology makes it easier to talk to each other across continents, the field of science is becoming more and more global. International collaboration among scientists is on the rise, according to a report from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

But even such broad collaboration is subject to gender biases that are embedded in the very structure and culture of global science, says Kathrin Zippel, who is a professor of sociology at Northeastern University. Another UNESCO report shows that women comprise less than 30 percent of the world’s researchers."

Read more at

https://news.northeastern.edu/2019/08/07/how-gender-bias-excludes-women-from-international-scientific-collaboration

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6. After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Elizabeth A. Harris

"Neil deGrasse Tyson, the astrophysicist who leads the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, will keep his job, the institution said on Thursday. The museum has closed an investigation into sexual misconduct accusations against him.

"The museum's investigation into allegations concerning Neil deGrasse Tyson is complete," a museum spokeswoman said in a brief statement. "Based on the results of the investigation, Dr. Tyson remains an employee and director of the Hayden Planetarium. Because this is a confidential personnel matter, there will be no further statements by the museum."

Dr. Tyson was accused of behaving inappropriately with two women in an article published in November on the website Patheos."

Read more at

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/26/arts/design/neil-degrasse-tyson-keeps-job.html

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7. Student evaluations of teaching are not only unreliable, they are significantly biased against female instructors
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Anne Boring, Kellie Ottoboni, and Philip B. Stark

"Many universities rely heavily or exclusively on student evaluations of teaching (SET) for hiring, promoting and firing instructors. After all, who experiences teaching more directly than students? But to what extent do SET measure what universities expect them to measure - teaching effectiveness?

To answer this question, we apply nonparametric permutation tests to data from a natural experiment at a French university (the original study by Anne Boring is here), and a randomized, controlled, blind experiment in the US (the original study by Lillian MacNell, Adam Driscoll and Andrea N. Hunt is here). We confirm and extend the studies' main conclusion: Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are strongly associated with the gender of the instructor. Female instructors receive lower scores than male instructors. SET are also significantly correlated with students' grade expectations: students who expect to get higher grades give higher SET, on average. But SET are not strongly associated with learning outcomes."

Read more at

https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2016/02/04/student-evaluations-of-teaching-gender-bias

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8. Why we need to keep talking about equality in physics
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Jess Wade and Maryam Zaringhalam

"The lack of diversity among physicists is an ongoing problem - and, while it persists, physics will fail to achieve its full potential. Jess Wade and Maryam Zaringhalam discuss the implications of poor diversity in the field and how it could be overcome."

Read more at

https://physicsworld.com/a/why-we-need-to-keep-talking-about-equality-in-physics

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9. Study suggests use of gender-neutral terms to describe people leads to gender equality
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Bob Yirka

"A pair of researchers, one with Washington University in St. Louis, the other with the University of California, has found evidence that suggests the use of gender-neutral terms to describe people promotes gender equality. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Margit Tavits and Efrén Pérez describe experiments they conducted with Swedish volunteers and what they found."

Read more at

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-gender-neutral-terms-people-gender-equality.html

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10. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Lawrence Fellowship (Postdoc), Livermore, CA https://fellowship.llnl.gov

- Education and Public Outreach Technologist, E/PO Group, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA http://web.sonoma.edu/jobs job #104879

- Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Experimental Planetary Science, Columbia University, New York, NY https://careers.aps.org/jobs/12685652/postdoctoral-research-scientist

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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