Friday, August 2, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for August 2, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 02, 2019

eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi
< br />[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
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This week's issues:

1. Astro2020 Decadal Survey White Papers

2. Still Soliciting Memories of Margaret Burbidge

3. Working Scientist podcast: Why physics is still a man’s world, and how to change it

4. What not to do in graduate school

5. Tales of the 28 lunar craters named for women offer a chance to reflect on women’s struggle for scientific recognition

6. In science, questions matter a lot. Men are more likely than women to ask them

7. Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy awarded for gender advancement

8. Women In Optics events at SPIE Optics + Photonics 2019

9. NASA analyst crowned Miss Universe Ireland

10. Wikipedia bios for women scientists are more likely to be flagged for removal

11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Astro2020 Decadal Survey White Papers
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

"The National Academies for Science, Engineering, and Medicine recently solicited white papers for the Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics (Astro2020). The Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy submitted two white papers to the call for the state of the profession consideration. Our papers were written based on preliminary results from our climate survey conducted this past spring. We want to thank the community members that took the time to provide such crucial and detailed feedback. Your contributions allowed us to provide clear, actionable recommendations that federal agencies can implement to address sexual harassment and career development for women and underserved minorities in the field of astronomy. You can access our papers at the links provided below."

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/07/astro2020-decadal-survey-white-papers.html

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2. Still Soliciting Memories of Margaret Burbidge
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

Our form for recording your memories of Dr. Margaret Burbidge is still open! Please share your memories for our online birthday card by August 2nd.

Access the form at

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe705PvYzN8rCoAuMN536VZb-WAlHAYs94gbE2EmyCVgJBtIw/viewform

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3. Working Scientist podcast: Why physics is still a man’s world, and how to change it
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Julie Gould

"In this first episode of a six-part series about careers in physics, Cornelis Storm, who leads the theory of polymers and soft-matter group at the Dutch university, tells Julie Gould why the “radical step” was sorely needed. He also describes why the physics department, and the discipline more generally, will benefit from being more diverse."

"Astrophysicist Elizabeth Tasker, an associate professor at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, was hired through a similar policy, and tells Gould about her experience."

Listen to the podcast at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02281-5?

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4. What not to do in graduate school
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Buddini Karawdeniya

"During my time as a graduate student researching analytical sensors in the Dwyer laboratory at The University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, I made a lot of mistakes — some of which matured into valuable lessons. If you are already in graduate school, or have decided to start, here are six things I recommend you do not do."

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02255-7

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5. Tales of the 28 lunar craters named for women offer a chance to reflect on women’s struggle for scientific recognition
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Emily K. Gibson

"Of the 1586 craters on the Moon named after individuals, only 28 are named after women—a fact that undoubtedly reveals more about the history of women in science than lunar topography. The Women of the Moon chronicles the lives and scientific work of these 28 women.

The book begins with a history of the Moon, encompassing how theories of the Moon’s formation have evolved over time as well as the various scientific attempts to measure the Moon’s distance and size. The next chapters provide biographical sketches of the individual “women of the Moon,” proceeding chronologically from Hypatia of Alexandria to Valentina Tereshkova."

Read more at

https://blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2019/07/29/the-women-of-the-moon

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6. In science, questions matter a lot. Men are more likely than women to ask them
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu] and Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By Melissa Healy

"When Beryl Cummings asked her first-ever question in the auditorium at a genetics conference, she chose a topic she knew a lot about, formulated her question as meticulously as she could, and addressed her query to a female presenter.

In science, questions matter a lot, said Cummings, who was then working on her doctorate in computational genomics at Harvard. But as a young female scientist speaking up in a public forum, she said, the stakes just felt a little higher."

Read more at

https://www.latimes.com/science/story/2019-06-25/men-ask-more-questions-at-scientific-conferences-manels

See also

Schmidt and Davenport (2017): https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1708/1708.02775.pdf Who asks questions at astronomy meetings?

Who Asks Questions at Conferences? It Depends on the Gender of the Speaker http://berkeleysciencereview.com/asks-questions-conferences-depends-gender-speaker

The Role of Gender in Asking Questions https://astrobites.org/2017/06/09/the-role-of-gender-in-asking-questions

AND a CSWA post from 2015: https://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/05/gender-representation-at-specialized.html

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7. Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy awarded for gender advancement
From: Rick Fienberg rick.fienberg_at_aas.org

"The Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy (CIRA) has received a Silver Pleiades Award from the Astronomical Society of Australia in recognition of its commitment to advancing women in astronomy, including through its support of the Athena SWAN Charter."

Read more at

https://news.curtin.edu.au/media-releases/curtin-institute-of-radio-astronomy-awarded-for-gender-advancement

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8. Women In Optics events at SPIE Optics + Photonics 2019
From: John Mather [johncm12_at_gmail.com]

The Importance of Inclusion in Photonics Research

On Monday, 12 August at 6:00 PM, join SPIE Women in Optics at the SPIE Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Presentation, “Improving Research Culture: How Photonics Benefits with the Full Spectrum of Scientists.”

Jess Wade, a physicist at Imperial College London, will explore evidence-based approaches that look to challenge stereotypes for the benefit of science and improve gender and social equity across all disciplines. After her talk, stay for the reception and discuss what you heard.

Read more at

http://spie.org/op/special-events/social-networking-event?utm_id=mop19wioe&spMailingID=3792459&spUserID=NTE0Mjk1MjAyMDgS1&spJobID=821056459&spReportId=ODIxMDU2NDU5S0&SSO=1

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9. NASA analyst crowned Miss Universe Ireland
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

This week Fionnghuala O’Reilly was crowned Miss Universe Ireland 2019. O’Reilly works as a NASA data analyst and said she "plans to use her position as an engineer and as a bi-racial woman to promote diversity and equality..."

Read more at

https://www.irishcentral.com/culture/entertainment/nasa-analyst-miss-universe-ireland

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10. Wikipedia bios for women scientists are more likely to be flagged for removal
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Cara Curtis

"It comes as no surprise that women are grossly underrepresented in fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Although the stats are disheartening, it doesn’t reflect women‘s ability, instead it acts as a stern reminder on the realities of the society we live in.

This reality is that, even from a young age, girls are discouraged from pursuing a career in STEM, and instead are told to look pretty and be “princesses.” It’s also a time when women who have carved out their career in science are struggling to get acknowledgement for their work and discoveries as Wikipedia is removing the biographies of women scientists. "

Read more at

https://thenextweb.com/tech/2019/07/31/wikipedia-bios-for-women-scientists-are-more-likely-to-be-flagged-for-removal

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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