Friday, May 31, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 31, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 31, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi (guest ed.)

Today's guest editor is Alessandra Aloisi. Alessandra studies stars and gas in nearby star-forming galaxies with UV/optical/NIR imaging and UV/optical spectroscopy to infer their chemical and evolutionary state. She received her PhD from Bologna University (Italy) in 1999. She then landed in the US and launched her career as postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and as associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. Alessandra joined the research staff at STScI in 2003, working first for the European Space Agency (ESA) and transferring to a position with the Association of the Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in 2009. At STScI, Alessandra started as instrument scientist for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and became the lead for the team responsible for the calibration, operations, and user support of these spectrographs just before the Hubble Servicing Mission 4. She then moved to be the Deputy Division Head of the Operations & Engineering Division, and is now the Head of the Science Mission Office where she oversees the science career and infrastructure of STScI as well as HST and JWST science policies.

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.
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This week's issues:

1. Maunakea Gender Equity and Inclusion Survey

2. The Hidden Heroines of Chaos

3. Commentary: Celebrating and supporting African American women in physics

4. 8 Tips For Generating Creative Ideas From The Mind Of A 'Genius' Woman Scientist

5. Astronomer Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz appointed to endowed chair for diversity in astronomy

6. Mary Sherman Morgan, The World’s First Woman Rocket Scientist

7. Eastern European universities score highly in university gender ranking

8. Commentary: Diversity in physics: Are you part of the problem?

9. I Am Fed Up With All-Male Panels. Here’s How We Change Them.

10. An astronomer’s poetic soul meets Dante’s scientific mind

11. 'Alien' turns 40: How the classic changed the game for women in action films

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Maunakea Gender Equity and Inclusion Survey

By Jessica Dempsey

Maunakea has the largest collective of astronomers in a single location - and the largest number of female scientists and engineers. After network and career building initiatives such as the women of Maunakea annual events - a survey was initiated to poll the demographics, experiences, and attitudes of the Observatories and astronomical institutes on the Hawaii islands to the challenges of equity and inclusion in our community.

The purpose was to create a baseline, a place to start. To understand just how much work we need to do to achieve equity and inclusion, and exactly what shape this work should take. Surveys such as these are only as useful if there is a commitment from leadership to initiate changes based on the results.

Since the survey, at East Asian Observatory we have set in motion a series of policy changes and initiatives based on the report and recommendations. We have reached gender equity in our science and operations groups and aim for full equity across our entire organization by 2022. We actively encourage our community of Observatories to set themselves similar goals. Across the astronomical community, Observatories and institutes alike, we achieve impossible technical and scientific feats on a near-daily basis. I'm pretty sure we can achieve this one too.

For more information about the survey results, please see the presentation I gave at the Gemini North Hilo Base Facility earlier this month. You can also access the full Maunakea Gender Equity and Diversity Survey Report.

Dr. Jessica Dempsey is Deputy Director of the East Asian Observatory and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. She was the first Australian female scientist to work at South Pole Station, Antartica, where she spent several summers building instruments of all kinds before wintering for a full year there with the ACBAR CMB experiment in 2005. She then moved to Hawaii, where she has worked for ten years, as they promised there would be no snow (they lied).

Friday, May 24, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 24, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 24, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.
Twitter @AAS_Women Facebook https://bit.ly/2PkU9of
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This week's issues:

1. Taking Over the Reins of the Women in Astronomy Blog

2. Gendered Observation: The Contribution of Women to the Astronomical Diaries of Mesopotamia

3. 18 Famous Women Who Explored Space

4. Looking at the State of Women in Engineering

5. What It's Like To Be An Asian American Woman In STEM Today

6. Why only 18% of data scientists are women

7. Twitter responses show sexual harassment is rife at academic conferences

8. The Disturbing Resilience of Scientific Racism

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Taking Over the Reins of the Women in Astronomy Blog

In the month of June, some of the members of the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) will be finishing their terms. This includes our Blogger-in-Chief, Cristina Thomas. Cristina served both as Blogger-in-Chief of the Women in Astronomy Blog and on the CSWA since 2016. She's done an amazing job highlighting news from the field that concerns astronomers who identify as women. We wish her all the best on her next endeavors.

Starting this week, I will be taking the reins from Cristina and posting weekly to the Women in Astronomy Blog. My name is JoEllen McBride and I am a CSWA member, avid science communicator, and partial astrophysicist. I communicate science in many ways, from writing blogs and news articles to giving talks to running workshops. I am thrilled to be continuing Cristina's work and taking on some of the new ideas we've discussed.

Among the first things I'd like to do is roll out exit interviews with the CSWA members that are stepping down. Hopefully, this will give our readers a better idea of what we do as a Committee (besides keeping up with the Blog). It's a brilliant idea of Cristina's and I'm excited to take this on! I also plan on bringing back the 'Meet Your CSWA' posts highlighting the remaining and incoming CSWA members. Finally, I am hoping to start a series that highlights the different paths we take on our journey to become astronomers. These diverse stories will highlight the many ways to become an astronomer as well as the various jobs you can do with the skills you learn. For example, I currently work for Penn Medicine Development and Alumni Relations as a Communications and Stewardship writer and know many astronomers who became data scientists or programmers for online courses and animation studios.

So, if you or someone you know has an interesting career path or you have ideas you want to share with our community that pertain to women in astronomy please reach out to joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com.

Friday, May 17, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 17, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 17, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups, and we continue to work on developing new instructions. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks. Twitter: @AAS_Women, Facebook: https://bit.ly/2PkU9of

Director Lori Glaze; Image Credit: NASA, from item 4
This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

2. Reflections on Ethics at the AAS

3. Modern Women in STEM Book Project

4. Women are now in charge of NASA's science missions

5. NASA’s initiative to put a woman on the Moon is named Artemis, after Apollo’s twin sister

6. Women in Kyrgyzstan are fighting sexism by joining the space race

7. How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels

8. Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

9. Commentary: The problematic media portrayals of women in science

10. Women gifted in math are still less likely than men to pursue it

11. Lawsuit Alleges Age, Race, Sex Discrimination At Mount Sinai Med School

12. 'I Don’t Want to Stay in a Country That Doesn’t Want Me As Badly as I Want It'

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Cross-post: Summary from the WiPS Networking event at LPSC 2019

Panelists at the WiPS LPSC Networking Event
The Women in Planetary Science (WiPS) event at LPSC (Lunary and Planetary Science Conference) in March commemorated the 50th LPSC by celebrating women scientists who have been in planetary science since the Apollo Era.

Read more about the event in a recent Women in Planetary Science blog post by Dr. Rajani Dhingra:

https://womeninplanetaryscience.wordpress.com/2019/05/12/summary-from-the-wips-networking-event-at-lpsc-2019/

Friday, May 10, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 10, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 10, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Ale Aloisi (guest ed.)

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange. Therefore, it is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. Please follow us on social media for updates and bear with us as we work out all the kinks.]
@AAS_Women Facebook

This week's issues:

1. Crosspost: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them

2. The largest study involving transgender people is providing long-sought insights about their health

3. Science Communication Workshop for Physical Sciences

4. Bonus: Talking Feminist Astrophysics with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

5. Decolonization and intersectionality in tech, with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

6. Arab women scientists call out gender discrimination in the workplace

7. Women in science are facing many of the same barriers, inequality, and discrimination that they did 300 years ago

8. Job Opportunities

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Cross-post: Female scientists start a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women join them.

Credit: 500 Women Scientists
In January 2018, 500 Women Scientists launched the "Request a Woman Scientist" database. Over the past couple of weeks a number of articles have been written about the inspiring number of women who have signed up. As of this week, over 9,000 women have joined!

Read more at

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/female-scientists-start-database-showcase-work-9000-women-62781410

Articles about this database have also appeared on phys.org, The Business Journals, STAT, and The Scientist.

Friday, May 3, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for May 3, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 3, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and JoEllen McBride


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This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers
2. National Academy of Sciences … Historic Number of Women Elected to Its Membership
3. An Engineering School With Half of Its Leadership Female? How Did That Happen?
4. Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies 
5. Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants 
6. Maria Kirch was the first woman to discover a comet, but her husband took the credit
7. Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings 
8. Job Opportunities
9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Cross-post: In lopsided vote, U.S. science academy backs move to eject sexual harassers

U.S. National Academies of Sciences
"Breaking with their 156-year history, members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today voted overwhelmingly in favor of amending the elite organization’s bylaws to allow ejection of members who breach the group’s new Code of Conduct, which outlines offenses including sexual harassment. Historically, membership in NAS has been an honor conferred for life." In a recent article in Science, Meredith Wadman discussed the vote which occurred this week at the NAS's annual business meeting. This vote only polled those who attended the meeting and is not final. All academy members will be given the opportunity to vote in the coming months.

Read more about the background of this change and the happenings of the meeting here:

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/lopsided-vote-us-science-academy-backs-move-eject-sexual-harassers

Many others have covered this story including Nature and The Verge