Friday, January 10, 2014

AASWOMEN Newsletter for January 10, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of January 10, 2014
eds. Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, amp; Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. Why So Few? Growth Mindset
2. Benefits of Being a Mentor in Academia
3. Closing Time at the "Astronomy Nightclub"
4. Interested in hosting a future Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics?
5. ICRAR Visiting Fellowing for Senior Women in Astronomy
6. APS/IBM Research Internships for Undergraduate Women
7. NASA History Program Office Interns for Undergraduates and Graduates
8. LPI Summer Internship for Undergraduates
9. Job Opportunities
10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

1. Why So Few? Growth Mindset
From: Joan Schmelz at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
In math and science, a growth mindset benefits girls. The 2010 report entitled, Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), finds that girls’ interests in math and science are shaped by social and environmental factors. The first finding comes from the research of Dr. Carol Dweck, a psychologist at Stanford University, who studies beliefs about intelligence. She finds that believing in the potential for intellectual growth, in and of itself, improves outcomes. Dr. Dweck’s research provides evidence that a “growth mindset” as opposed to a “fixed mindset” benefits girls …
To read more, please see
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
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2. Benefits of Being a Mentor in Academia
From: John Johnson at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
Today's guest post is by Wen-fai Fong, a graduate student in the Harvard Astronomy Department … Lying on my couch on Thanksgiving Eve, nearly comatose from uncomfortable amounts of turkey sitting in my stomach, I flipped on the TV. To my delight, Star Wars: Return of the Jedi was playing. A few commercial breaks later and I was wide awake, weeping during the scene in which Yoda dies. This got me thinking: Yoda was such a fantastic mentor to Luke Skywalker, and Luke obviously went on to do great things. But what the heck did Yoda get out of it?
To read more, please see
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
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3. Closing Time at the "Astronomy Nightclub"
From: Anonymous at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
Today's guest post is from an astronomer friend of mine who moved to the states relatively recently (and is attending an astronomy conference -- eds.). Her story is not her's alone… In my home country women get remarks on their looks on a daily basis. It happens when they walk down the street, when they are at the grocery store, and sometimes even at work. Here in the US, this doesn't happen so often, and I like it. Especially at work where I can focus on science and nothing else. There is a generally accepted "rule" that we are all scientists in the scientific workplace (for the most part anyway). Yet, something goes wrong at science conferences; so wrong it tips the balance between men and women in science.
To read more, please see:
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
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4. Interested in hosting a future Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics?
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]
Is your institution interested in hosting a conference for undergraduate women in physics and astronomy, which are held over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend in mid-January. Applications are now being accepted for those wishing to host in 2016. For more information, please see,
http://www.aps.org/programs/women/workshops/cuwip-host.cfm
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5. ICRAR Visiting Fellowing for Senior Women in Astronomy
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]
The International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) is accepting applications from women astronomers having more than five years research work experience post PhD to visit and interact with ICRAR researchers and graduate students. The fellowship includes a stipend, travel assistance, and other assistance such as for childcare. Applications open February 1 and close March 30. To read more on information needed in an application, please see
http://www.icrar.org/research/icrar-visiting-fellowship-for-senior-women-in-astronomy
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6. APS/IBM Research Internships for Undergraduate Women
From: WIPHYS, December 20, 2013
Application deadline is February 1* for the APS and IBM co-sponsored two undergraduate research internship programs. One of the programs is for undergraduate women and another is for underrepresented minorities (African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans). A goal of the programs is to encourage women to pursue graduate studies in science and engineering. Both internship programs feature salaried positions at IBM research locations that are typically 10 weeks long and provide an opportunity for interns to work closely with an IBM mentor. The undergraduate women internships are at one of three IBM research locations (San Jose, CA, Austin, TX, or Yorktown Heights, NY). The research internships for underrepresented minorities are at IBM Almaden in San Jose, CA.
To learn more, please see Women’s Internships: http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/ibm/index.cfm Underrepresented Minorities Internships: http://www.almaden.ibm.com/almaden/diversity
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7. Undergraduate Interns for NASA History Program Office
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]
Undergraduate and graduate students of all majors are encouraged to apply for a summer or fall 2014 internship at the NASA History Program Office. Students would answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, educators, scholars, students, and others from around the world about the archival materials maintained at the History Program Office. Detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary. However, some basic familiarity and a keen interest with these topics are needed. Students need to have strong research, writing, and editing skills and should have experience with social media. The intern projects are flexible. A typical project may include one or more of the following: - handling information requests - conducting research - writing biographical sketches - identifying and captioning photos - writing posts for the NASA history twitter - writing posts for NASA history Facebook pages - editing historical manuscripts
Applications are due Feb. 4 for summer internships and June 1 for fall internships. For more information, please see
http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm
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8. LPI Summer Internship for Undergraduates
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]
The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) invites undergraduates to apply for a summer internship (June 2 through August 8, 2014) where he/she will work one-on-one with a scientist at LPI or at NASA Johnson Space Center on a research project of current interest in lunar and planetary science. Students need to have at least 0 semester hours of credit to participate. Interns will receive a stipend plus travel support. Application deadline is Janurary 17. To apply, please see:
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lpiintern
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9. Job Opportunities
For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease
* Scientific Software Developer at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy http://jobregister.aas.org/job_view?JobID=46897
The deadline for applications listed in the AAS job post is 6th January, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
* Program Coordinator to support Hubble Space Telescope, STScI, Baltimore,MD http://www.stsci.edu/institute/employment
* Tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Physics Education Research at Rowan Univeristy http://rowanuniversity.hodesiq.com/jobs/assistant-professor-in-physics-education-full-time-tenure-track-glassboro-new-jersey-job-3994917
* Research Postdoc in Gravitational-Wave Group at Syracuse University: http://web.physics.syr.edu/job-opps/index.html
* Systems Developer in Gravitational-Wave Group at Syracuse University: http://web.physics.syr.edu/job-opps/index.html
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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter
To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org
All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.
When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.
Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.
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11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter
Join AAS Women List by email:
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12. Access to Past Issues
http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html
Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.
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