Friday, November 1, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for November 1, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of November 01, 2019
eds: JoEllen McBride, Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and Alessandra Aloisi

This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: Every woman has an 'I Don't' list. And it's about time we shared them.

2. 6 Steps Everyone Can Take To Become An Ally In White, Male-Dominated Workplaces

3. Becoming a parent in graduate school shaped my approach to work–life balance

4. Preventing Harassment in Science: Building a Community of Practice Towards Meaningful Change

5. Nancy Grace Roman and the Dawn of Space Astronomy

6. Women are regularly read and cited less in academia, but not for lack of research, UCI study shows

7. An ongoing conversation on diversity in science

8. November National Geographic Magazine

9. Caroline Herschel Prize Lecture

10. Staying Power: Women in Science on What It Takes to Succeed

11. The Science Of Storytelling: Inspiring The Next Generation Of Female STEM Leaders

12. AstroAmbassadors: Need help finding more applicants for Jan 2020 Ambassadors workshop

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

From item 2.

1. Cross-post: Every woman has an 'I Don't' list. And it's about time we shared them.
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

We all do so much. It's so easy to forget all you do and just focus on what you don't. But instead of feeling guilty for all the things you don't do, what if we shared them! Holly Wainwright, Head of Content on the Mamamia blog, writes in this blog post "But now I can see that what women really need to hear is not how other women “do it all”, so that we can mimic their to-do lists and add more and more to our cracking plates. No. We need to hear what other women aren’t doing."

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/10/cross-post-every-woman-has-i-dont-list.html

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2. 6 Steps Everyone Can Take To Become An Ally In White, Male-Dominated Workplaces
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Ethan Siegel

"In some ways, it's true that life isn't fair for each and every one of us. But for those of us who are underrepresented in our chosen career field, the level of unfairness is greatly magnified. A large number of scientific, technical and academic professions — including computer programming, mathematics, physics, chemistry, engineering, etc. — are inordinately dominated at all levels (undergraduate, graduate school, early career, senior positions) by white males, far in excess of what one would expect if there were a level playing field.

The gender and racial disparities in these (and other) fields cannot be explained away by the "inherent differences" hypothesis. However, there are real, ubiquitous, and pervasive problems that disproportionately affect women, people of color, and all underrepresented minorities. This includes not only harassment, but many inappropriate behaviors that add up to send the toxic message of, "you don't belong here."

Thankfully, more and more voices are speaking up to counter that message. Here are six steps that you can take to help."

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2019/10/25/6-steps-everyone-can-take-to-become-an-ally-in-white-male-dominated-workplaces/#575e0fb149fd

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3. Becoming a parent in graduate school shaped my approach to work–life balance
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Karishma Kaushik

By being open about her family and life commitments, Dr. Kaushik not only improved her research and teaching experiences she also noticed a vast improvement in her professional relationships. "Because I was open, others were more open with me, too. While my concerns centred[sic] around childcare and managing dual career paths with my spouse (an engineer in the private sector), I discovered that my colleagues had their own hurdles to jump: mental health, immigration concerns or financial constraints."

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03162-7

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4. Preventing Harassment in Science: Building a Community of Practice Towards Meaningful Change
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

We are happy to announce the Preventing Harassment in Science: Building a Community of Practice Toward Meaningful Change workshop scheduled for March 31–April 2, 2020 at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) National Training Center (NTC), 9828 North 31st Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85051.

The goal of this workshop is to bring leaders of anti-harassment efforts together to share ideas and discuss best practice methods to reduce harassment in the scientific workplace. An expected outcome of this workshop is to create a community of practice to continue future anti-harassment efforts.

Read more at

https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/anti-harassment2020

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5. Nancy Grace Roman and the Dawn of Space Astronomy
From: Jessica Mink [jmink_at_cfa.harvard.edu]

"Dear readers: We are sad to report that, soon after submitting her draft manuscript for this prefatory chapter, Nancy Grace Roman passed away on December 25, 2018. This final version of her memoir has been lightly edited but remains very true to the original. However, an Abstract was missing. Rather than trying to synthesize one in Nancy Grace's inimitable style, we take this opportunity to comment briefly on her life and its significance."

Read more at

https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-astro-091918-104446

An audio clip to go with the article

https://www.annualreviews.org/do/10.1146/annurev-astro-061819-095801/abs

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6. Women are regularly read and cited less in academia, but not for lack of research, UCI study shows
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Lilly Nguyen

"Only about one out of every five readings recently assigned to graduate political science students was written by a woman — a disparity that could affect the kind of research students go on to do in their academic careers, a recent UC Irvine study found.

The report — from Heidi Hardt, an associate professor of political science at UCI; co-author Amy Erica Smith, an associate professor of political science at Iowa State University, and other researchers — examined 88,673 doctoral-level readings assigned to graduate students nationwide and determined that women were the lead authors on only 18.7% of them.

That is significantly lower than the rate at which women are published in top journals, which is 27%, according to the study."

Read more at

https://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/news/story/2019-10-25/women-are-regularly-read-and-cited-less-in-academia-but-not-for-lack-of-research-uci-study-shows

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7. An ongoing conversation on diversity in science
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Javiera Gutierrez Duran

"The Gairdner/L’Oréal-UNESCO Forum on Diversity and Excellence in Science took place at the MaRS Centre on September 30.

The conference was hosted in part by the Gairdner Foundation, which aims to recognize “international excellence in fundamental research that impacts human health.”

“Many groups are underrepresented in research, including women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, Indigenous people, and socially disadvantaged populations,” said Dr. Janet Rossant, a professor at U of T’s Departments of Molecular Genetics and Obstetrics & Gynaecology, in an interview with The Varsity. Rossant is also the president and scientific director of the Gairdner Foundation, and chief of research emeritus at the SickKids Research Institute.

“This is an ongoing conversation and ongoing discussion that we have to have across many aspects of our lives today.”"

Read more at

https://thevarsity.ca/2019/10/27/an-ongoing-conversation-on-diversity-in-science

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8. November National Geographic Magazine
From: Kevin Marvel [kevin.marvel_at_aas.org]

100% dedicated to women, their status in Society, progress made over time, even a section on women in STEM. Worth reading cover to cover.

Read more at

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine

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9. Caroline Herschel Prize Lecture
From: Fran Bagenal [bagenal_at_lasp.colorado.edu]

The 2019 Caroline Herschel Prize Lecture will be given by by Dr Anna Lisa Varri at the University of Bath, UK, on Tuesday 26 November. The topic of her lecture is “Small stellar systems, big astrophysical questions"

The William Herschel Society, in association with the Royal Astronomical Society, established the Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship to celebrate Caroline’s memory by supporting promising female astronomers early in their careers. Caroline, William’s younger sister, started out as his assistant, but in time became recognised as an important astronomer in her own right, was the first to be paid as such. and was awarded the RAS Gold Medal in 1828.

Read more at:

http://www.williamherschel.org.uk

http://www.williamherschel.org.uk/caroline-herschel-lecture-prize

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10. Staying Power: Women in Science on What It Takes to Succeed
From: [ForWomenInScience_at_us.loreal.com]

The L’Oréal USA For Women in Science (FWIS) program is pleased to announce the release of our new study on postdoctoral women in STEM, commissioned in partnership with the Heising-Simons Foundation and conducted by research firm RTI International.

Since 2003, L’Oréal USA’s FWIS program has supported 75 outstanding female postdoctoral scientists from across the country, awarding them nearly $4 million in grants. Amazingly, all of these women have bucked the “leaky pipeline” trend and remained in STEM-related careers. To mark the 15th anniversary of the program and to further contribute to the dialogue around strategies for increasing the staying power of women in STEM fields, L’Oréal USA and Heising-Simons commissioned a study of the 75 FWIS fellows to explore how their experiences and recommendations can help more women succeed in science during this critical postdoctoral career stage and beyond.

Join the conversation on Twitter and follow us on Facebook and Instagram for more on Staying Power, and be sure to check out our feature as part of NBC’s Know Your Value platform!

Lastly, we will be hosting a webinar on Thursday, November 21st from 3-4pm (EST) to share the findings of the study. The RSVP link is here and we would welcome any participation from you and your colleagues.

Read more at

https://www.lorealusa.com/csr-commitments/l%E2%80%99or%C3%A9al-usa-for-women-in-science-program/alumni-study

https://www.nbcnews.com/know-your-value/feature/5-ways-close-gender-gap-women-stem-ncna1070101

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6034300535646251275

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11. The Science Of Storytelling: Inspiring The Next Generation Of Female STEM Leaders
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Amy Blankson

"In the past few years, I’ve read (and written) so many stories about the need for more women in STEM careers. I’ve heard time and again about how we need a better pipeline of women entering these fields, so that more women can rise into leadership positions. I’ve reported on why women offer a unique perspective in the field and how a new discipline focused on Gendered Innovations is emerging. But one question that has been lingering in my mind is: are these efforts to inspire young girls actually working? And are they enough?"

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amyblankson/2019/10/28/the-science-of-storytelling/#7351d3c6252e

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12. AstroAmbassadors: Need help finding more applicants for Jan 2020 Ambassadors workshop
From: Greg Schultz [gschultz_at_astrosociety.org] and JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

We are in the midst of recruiting for the January 2020 workshop for AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, and we are facing a present shortage of qualifying applicants (especially postdocs, but others are needed too). Can you help us spread the word? Below is an announcement we'd love to have you pass on.

Personal encouragements from Ambassadors alumni such as yourself, to colleagues and networks you know, can go a long way toward helping us uncover more worthy applicants and continue to grow our community.

For more information about the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, see https://aas.org/outreach/aas-astronomy-ambassadors-program

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application, see https://aas.org/meetings/aas235/aas-astronomy-ambassadors-workshop

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13. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Head of Instrumentation, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ https://lowell.edu/about/employment

-Tenured or visiting Wong Ngit Liong Professorship in Science, Yale-NUS College, Singapore https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/15302

-Postdoctoral Research Associate at Georgia State University https://gsu.taleo.net/careersection/jobdetail.ftl?job=19001206

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14. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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16. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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