Friday, September 20, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for September 20, 2019

From item # 2
AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 20, 2019
eds: JoEllen McBride, Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and Alessandra Aloisi

This week's issues:

1. Cross-post: What’s new for women+ on the science teams for NASA’s robotic planetary missions?

2. From Moon Goddesses to Astronauts: Picturing Women in Space

3. How to close the gender gap in science and technology

4. Gender equality: 'No room at the top for women scientists'

5. NASA Workshop: PI Launchpad

6. The Physics Teacher call for papers

7. Another Epstein-Related Resignation

8. Gender & Sex Discrimination in the Workplace | Hofstra MA ALS Online

9. AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Workshop: Techniques & Resources for Effective Public Engagement

10. Job Opportunities

11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWOMEN newsletter


1. Cross-post: What’s new for women+ on the science teams for NASA’s robotic planetary missions?
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Rathbun et al. examine the percentage of women-presenting people (hereafter referred to as women+) on spacecraft science teams over the last 41 years.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/09/cross-post-whats-new-for-women-on.html

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2. From Moon Goddesses to Astronauts: Picturing Women in Space
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

“Imaging Women in the Space Age” is currently on view at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, through November 2019. It "showcases ... women’s remarkable achievements—and also highlights how the idea of women in space has long fascinated filmmakers, television writers, advertisers and fashion designers."

Read more at

https://msmagazine.com/2019/09/11/from-moon-goddesses-to-astronauts-picturing-women-in-space

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3. How to close the gender gap in science and technology
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Lesley Franklin

“It is no secret that women are woefully under-represented in careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics or ‘STEM’. According to community interest company Wise, women make up 14 per cent of people working in the UK’s STEM sector, despite representing half the total workforce.”

Read more at

https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/how-to-close-the-gender-gap-in-science-and-technology-lesley-franklin-1-5006032

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4. Gender equality: 'No room at the top for women scientists'
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Helen Briggs

"The number of women climbing the career ladder in science is "disappointingly low", say researchers. Women make up half of students in the life sciences, but only one in four professors, according to data from 500 scientific institutions worldwide.The main problem lies with retaining and promoting women into influential positions, the study concluded. It found women had fewer chances to serve on committees or speak at scientific meetings. Other factors included unconscious bias, tensions with work-life balance, poor funding and pay, and a lack of networking opportunities."

Read more at

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49552812

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5. NASA Workshop: PI Launchpad
From: Nancy Morrison [nancy.morrison_at_utoledo.edu] and Matthew Greenhouse [matt.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

Important Dates:

Applications due on NSPIRES: October 4th, 2019 Selections made no later than: October 21st, 2019 Workshop Dates: November 18th-20th, 2019 Workshop Location: University of Arizona Campus, Tucson, AZ

Workshop Description:

“Are you thinking about developing your first flight mission proposal in the next few years but have no idea where to start? If you are a researcher in any NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) discipline who wants to take your career to the next level but have not yet held a leadership position on mission proposals or large science teams, this is the workshop for you. Join us November 18 - 20, 2019 in Tucson, AZ for Launchpad: an expenses-paid three-day workshop that will teach you the skills to get your mission idea off the ground.

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD), in partnership with the University of Arizona and the Heising-Simons Foundation, will host Launchpad to guide participants through turning their science question into a mission concept. Participants will go step-by-step through the process of developing a science case, defining requirements, building a team, securing partnerships, and obtaining support from the home institution. Participants will also have time for networking and personal reflection as they mature their mission concepts.”

Read more and apply at

https://science.nasa.gov/researchers/pi-launchpad

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6. The Physics Teacher call for papers
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

“In December of last year, Editor Gary White issued a call for papers on "Sex, gender, and physics"... While a few talented writers have answered this call with new manuscripts thus far, we are still hoping to get more and more varied submissions with an eye toward publishing a collection on the topic in spring 2020. We hope to see manuscripts directed toward the audience of practicing introductory physics teachers, covering as many facets of sex and gender-related issues that can be imagined, including LGBTQ issues, underrepresentation of women, and the role that identity plays in the classroom…If you would like to contribute to this project, please submit your item through our online submission system, …, by October 1, 2019.”

Read more at

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10157060188658876&id=103128488875

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7. Another Epstein-Related Resignation
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

By Colleen Flaherty

"The most recent academic casualty in the Jeffrey Epstein case is Richard Stallman -- so he says.

Stallman, a visiting professor in Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s esteemed computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory, or CSAIL, announced in a brief post to his website this week that he’s stepping down immediately “due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations.”"

Read more at

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/09/18/computer-scientist-richard-stallman-leaves-mit-amid-controversial-remarks-about

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8. Gender & Sex Discrimination in the Workplace | Hofstra MA ALS Online
From: Rebecca Cross [discrimination.outreach_at_gmail.com]

“Over half of the world’s population spends roughly one-third of their lives at work, according to the World Health Organization. Your work environment is a huge factor in determining your overall health and happiness, and, though no job is perfect, we all deserve to feel comfortable in the workplace. Unfortunately, some people feel exactly the opposite, experiencing prejudice and downright hostility at work, simply because they are who they are.

The issue of sex and gender discrimination has become increasingly prevalent in modern life. In fact, over 40% of women in the U.S. have reported experiencing discrimination at work because of their gender. And women aren’t the only ones affected by it; men and people of all genders in the LGBTQ community are also susceptible to gender discrimination.

Despite how common it is, gender discrimination can be difficult to identify and even more difficult to prevent. This guide from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University, however, will define what sex discrimination is, go over common examples of it in the workplace, illustrate the scope of the issue with statistics, describe steps that can be taken to prevent discrimination, and provide resources that can offer additional support. After all, understanding gender discrimination is the first step you can take toward preventing it in the workplace.”

Read more at

https://onlinelaw.hofstra.edu/master-of-laws-in-american-law/gender-discrimination-in-the-workplace

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9. AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Workshop: Techniques & Resources for Effective Public Engagement
From: Andrew Fraknoi [fraknoiandrew_at_fhda.edu]

The American Astronomical Society (AAS) is sponsoring a free skill-building workshop -- and an ongoing community of practice -- to support early-career astronomers in providing effective outreach to schools, families, and the public. Working with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Portal to the Public Project, and other outreach organizations, the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program (now in its eighth year) offers two days of hands-on training, extensive resources, and pre-tested activities – plus the opportunity to join a like-minded group of peers.

If you are a graduate student, postdoc, recent faculty, or advanced undergraduate committed to a career in the astronomical sciences, and if you’re interested in spending a fraction of your time helping students and the public become more scientifically literate, this is an invitation to sharpen your outreach skills and join the growing AAS Astronomy Ambassadors community.

The AAS Astronomy Ambassadors workshop will be held on the Friday and Saturday before the start of the winter AAS meeting in Honolulu. Participants will spend two active days learning techniques, examining selected materials, and getting to know each other and an existing community of astronomers doing outreach. There will be sessions appropriate for those who have done outreach already and for those who are just beginners. No experience is required. We especially want to encourage participation by members of groups underrepresented in science.

Workshop costs are being underwritten by the AAS and an NSF grant, so registration (for the workshop only, not for the AAS meeting), materials, and two days’ lunches are free. If necessary, we can also reimburse you for up to two nights’ lodging at one of the designated meeting hotels if your attendance at the workshop requires you to travel to the meeting venue earlier than you otherwise would. (Participants are expected to be members of the AAS or to join, and to register for the AAS meeting itself. Note that significantly reduced membership fees are available to students and to educators.)

Applications are being accepted now and must be in no later than 4 Nov 2019. However, space is limited, and successful applicants are accepted on a rolling basis, so we urge you to get your application in before all the spaces are gone.

For more information about the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, read at

https://aas.org/outreach/aas-astronomy-ambassadors-program

For more information about the workshop and a link to the online application, read at

https://aas.org/meetings/aas235/aas-astronomy-ambassadors-workshop

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10. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Tenure-track position, solar physics, New Mexico State University https://jobs.nmsu.edu/postings/36545

- Tenure-track position, planetary sciences, New Mexico State University https://jobs.nmsu.edu/postings/36589

- Tenure-track position, Galactic or extragalactic astronomy, New Mexico State University https://jobs.nmsu.edu/postings/36596

- Assistant Professor, Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/8b5f6680

- STScI Fellowships, Space Telescope Science Institute https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/0c42fba4

- Space Telescope Prize Research Fellowships, Space Telescope Science Institute https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/77a8d8e2

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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