Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Link list

Before I disappear for the Thanksgiving break, I thought I'd clear out my list of links I've been collecting:

How Not to Write a Recommendation Letter, from Cosmic Variance (This comes a bit late in job season, I know, but better late than never, right?)

MIT economists find a new reason to think that environment, not innate ability, determines how well girls do in math class

NSF Earth Science Change in Policy Regarding Postdocs and Parental Leave (from Isis)

Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

Title IX Includes Maternal Discrimination (Chronicle of Higher Education)


Enjoy your Thanksgiving!

Sunday, November 22, 2009

AASWomen for November 20, 2009

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of October 20, 2009
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson & Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1. What Can I Do? Inspirations from Women in Astronomy III

2. Follow-up: What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?

3. Article from Science: One version of the "Academic Caste System"

4. Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

5. Women in Astronomy on GEMS

6. Mildred Cohn, Biochemist

7. Tenure-Track Faculty Position, New Mexico State University

8. Tenure-Track Faculty Position, The Ohio State University

9. Telescope Operator position, GBT, NRAO

10. IBM Research Internship For Undergraduate Women

*** FOLLOWING POSITIONS TAKEN FROM WIPHYS ***

11. Two Assistant/Associate Professor Tenure-Track Positions, Dept of Physics And Astronomy, University Of Denver

12. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

13. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN


1. What Can I Do? Inspirations from Women in Astronomy III
From: Joan_at_Women_in_Astronomy_Blog, Nov 11, 2009

Here is a list of 10 suggestions for postdocs and graduate students who would like to do something to promote women in astronomy and help create a female-friendly workplace:

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/

Number 10 reads, "Make a suggestion to add to this list." Post your contributions on the blog site or send them to AASWOMEN_at_aas.org. We'll compile them and add the list to the Advice section of our web page.

This list is available in a brochure format. Check out the "What's New" section of the CSWA home page for the link:

http://www.aas.org/cswa

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2. Follow-up: What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?
From: AASWomen editors

In last week's issue of AASWomen (Issue of November 13, 2009), we listed some items that women can negotiate in their job offer. What we did not address is who should ask for what that depends on which job. For example, what should graduate students negotiate in their job offer for a post-doc position? What should post-docs negotiate in their job offer for faculty positions? What should someone negotiate in a job offer at a planetarium, for an outreach position, at a museum, at a laboratory, at a telescope, for a government position, for a policy position, for a teaching position, etc? We asked for suggestions, and several of you responded with some excellent ideas, which we have compiled and posted on the Women in Astronomy blog ( http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ ).

We'll be adding these suggestions to the CSWA Advice webpage ( http://www.aas.org/cswa/advice.html ); where you can already find advice for postdocs applying for tenure-track positions.

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3. Article from Science: One version of the "Academic Caste System"
From: AAWomen editors

If you are applying for a faculty position, then you might want to read a fantastic article in Science Careers, "Taken for Granted: Shocked, Shocked! to Find Disappointment on Campus" (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2009_11_13/caredit.a0900141).

This article provides good insight into the happiness of faculty at different types of colleges and universities. Bottom line is that your happiness is what you make of it in your position. However, negotiating the job offer can ease some stressors.

Thanks to Wallace Sargent for sending us this timely link.

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4. Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences
From: Kathleen Flint [kflint_at_nationalpostdoc.org]

Here is a recently released study from Goulden, Frasch and Mason and the Center for American Progress http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html .

Their latest data examine the "leaky" pipeline for women and lack of advancement into tenure positions compared with men. They find the biggest differences for married women with children, and suggest that the lack of family-friendly policies is one of the biggest hurdles for graduate students and postdocs to advance in their careers.

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5. Women in Astronomy on GEMS
From: Don Kniffen [dkniffen_at_usra.edu]

She's an Astronomer: GEMS Leadership

The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission, which was selected competitively as a Small Explorer mission by NASA in July 2009. This mission, selected in the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009, will not only produce cutting edge science, but is a historic first for NASA space science in having an all female and ethnically diverse leadership team. Dr. Jean Swank (Goddard Space Flight Center), is the Principal Investigator, Ms. Sandra Cauffman, Project Manager, Ms. Aprille Ericsson, Integration Manager, Dr. Joaanne Hill, Polarimeter Systems Scientist, and Dr. Helen Hwang, Observatory Manager. NASA Headquarters oversight is provided by Ms. Lia Lapiana, Program Executive, and Dr. Hashima Hasan, Program Scientist. GEMS will lead to a major advance in our understanding of extreme conditions and physics of black holes, magnetars and supernova remnants.

The GEMS Leadership Team has been chosen by the IYA She's an Astronomer cornerstone project for the Picture of the Day posting on the IAU IYA website.

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6. Mildred Cohn, Biochemist
From: Jay Pasachoff [jay.m.pasachoff_at_williams.edu]

I think many of your readers would be interested in the tribulations and successes of biochemist Dr. Mildred Cohn, as shown in this New York Times article.

SCIENCE | November 11, 2009 Mildred Cohn, Biochemist, Is Dead at 96 By DOUGLAS MARTIN Dr. Cohn was a leading researcher whose work contributed to the development of medical technologies like M.R.I.'s.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/11/science/11cohn.html?emc=eta1

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7. Tenure-Track Faculty Position, New Mexico State University
From: Ofelia Ruiz [oruiz_at_nmsu.edu]

The New Mexico State University (NMSU) Department of Astronomy invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in Solar/Stellar astrophysics beginning August 2010. We expect that this appointment will be filled at the level of Assistant Professor, but appointment at the Associate Professor level may be possible in exceptional cases.

Qualifications: Applicants must have a Ph.D. in astronomy, astrophysics, physics, or a closely related field. Candidates with a demonstrable research record in fields associated with work done at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) are encouraged to apply. Example fields include solar/stellar structure and dynamics, solar activity, space weather, spectropolarimetry, MHD, and the solar-stellar connection. See the NSO Long Range Plan FY2009-2013 available on the NSO web site for further details. Of particular interest are candidates with expertise in solar or stellar pulsations and also high-resolution solar observations and their interpretation. The successful candidate will ideally provide evidence of their ability to deliver high quality instruction at the graduate and undergraduate levels, a sustained external research funding record, and experience as an advisor to MS and PhD students.

The Department is involved in a wide range of astronomical research. We also benefit from membership in the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) and its Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5-meter telescope. The Department operates its own 1-meter telescope at APO, is a member of the Sloan III project, and is a user of numerous ground based observatories and NASA scientific satellites. Additional Department information can be found at http://astronomy.nmsu.edu .

NMSU serves a diverse undergraduate and graduate population of 18,500 students. Located in Las Cruces (the state's second largest city), NMSU is within driving distance of: the Apache Point Observatory, the National Solar Observatory, the NRAO Very Large Array, the McDonald Observatory, and Kitt Peak National Observatory.

To be considered for this position, send a cover letter, a brief statement of research interests and plans (including a discussion of anticipated research directions over the next five years), a brief description of teaching experience and philosophy, unofficial transcripts of PhD and a curriculum vitae to:

Dr. Bernard McNamara Chair, Faculty Search Committee Department of Astronomy New Mexico State University, MSC 4500 1320 Frenger St. Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

Applicants should arrange for three confidential letters of recommendation to be sent to the above address. Review of completed applications will begin January 1, 2010 and will continue until the position is filled or closed. Questions can be addressed to: astfaculty_at_nmsu.edu or (575) 646-4438.

New Mexico State University is an EEO/AA Employer. Offer of employment contingent upon verification of individual's eligibility for employment in the United States. All offers of employment, oral and written are contingent on the university's verification of credentials and other information required by federal law, state law, and NMSU policies/procedures, and will include the completion of a criminal history check.

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8. Tenure-Track Faculty Position, The Ohio State University
From: WIPHYS, November 19, 2009

Faculty Position in Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, The Ohio State University

The Department of Physics at The Ohio State University anticipates a tenure track faculty appointment effective Fall Quarter 2010. Highly qualified candidates in all areas of particle astrophysics and cosmology are invited to apply. While we are primarily searching for a junior experimentalist, exceptionally well-qualified candidates at all levels in either theory or experiment will be considered. The position is affiliated with the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, a joint venture between the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, and a joint appointment in the Department of Astronomy is possible. Additional information about CCAPP can be found at http://ccapp.osu.edu . Applicants should have a Ph.D. and an outstanding research record. A commitment to excellence in teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels is essential.

The Department currently has 55 faculty and approximately 60 postdoctoral researchers and research scientists, 160 graduate students, and 250 undergraduate majors. Our expanding research operation is located in the new Physics Research Building, which contains state-of-the-art office, meeting and laboratory space. Additional information about the department may be found at http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu.

All applications should be submitted electronically at http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/jobs/facultyapp/

Candidates should submit a letter of application, a complete curriculum vitae including a list of publications, a brief description of research plans, and a teaching statement. Senior applicants should provide contact information for at least four people from whom letters of reference may be requested. Junior applicants should arrange for at least four letters of reference to be sent to one of the addresses below:

astrosearch09_at_mps.ohio-state.edu (Please note applicant's name in subject line.)

Astrophysics Search Committee Department of Physics The Ohio State University 191 West Woodruff Avenue Columbus, OH 43210

Applications received by 1 December 2009 are assured of full consideration. Job application assistance is available for dual career situations.

To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. Flexible work options are available. Ohio State is an NSF ADVANCE Institution, EEO/AA employer.

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9. Telescope Operator position, GBT, NRAO
From: Dee Boyd [dlboyd_at_nrao.edu]

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in Green Bank, WV, is seeking a Telescope Operator to safely and efficiently monitor and operate one or more telescopes, monitor the performance of telescope systems, and assist engineers and technicians in diagnosing telescope equipment failures. This position may be filled at the Telescope Operator III entry level depending on qualifications.

The Telescope Operator will work on a 24/7 rotating shift pattern (consisting of day and night shifts) operating and monitoring one or more telescopes and supporting equipment. Additional duties include receiving a schedule of observation programs or technical activities; reviewing the objectives and requirements; enabling required equipment, and then initiating and ending the observations; communicating with on-site or remote observers, receiving observing instructions from other observers, executing their programs, monitoring their data collection; and making changes and adjustments as needed.

The successful candidate must be able to operate a computer using process control software applications, and be able to use a Windows computer and word processing and spreadsheet software. Other requirements include experience with, or the ability to learn, a Unix operating environment; demonstrated ability to read and interpret documents such as schematics, operating and maintenance instructions, and procedure manuals; ability to work safely near moving mechanical parts and around electrical equipment; ability to follow procedures and policies; calmly handle emergencies; communicate clearly both verbally and in writing; be attentive to detail; and be able to work well with others, sometimes in stressful situations.

A minimum of an Associate's degree or equivalent from an accredited two-year college or technical school with training in math, physics, science or a related technical field is required.

For further requirements and to apply, please visit our Careers site at https://careers.nrao.edu . Include a resume. Review of applications will begin immediately; however, applications will be accepted until the position is filled. NRAO is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V.

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10. IBM Research Internship For Undergraduate Women
From: WIPHYS, Nov. 13, 2009

In 2010, IBM will offer a Summer Research Internship for Undergraduate Women. These summer internships are salaried positions typically 10 weeks long, and include the opportunity to work with a mentor at one of three IBM research locations. Applications must be submitted by February 1, 2010. Complete details on the program and how to apply are available at http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/index.cfm

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11. Two Assistant/Associate Professor Tenure-Track Positions, Dept of
Physics And Astronomy, University Of Denver
From: WIPHYS November 16, 2009

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Denver underwent strong expansion with six new Assistant Professor positions filled in the last three years. New positions were filled in condensed matter physics, astrophysics, and biophysics. This announcement invites applications for two positions: (1) a tenure-track assistant professorship in experimental condensed matter physics; (2) a tenure-track assistant or associate professorship in computational or theoretical condensed matter physics. For the second position, we will also consider exceptional candidates in astrophysics with overlapping interests in nanophysics or biophysics who can participate in the interdisciplinary initiatives mentioned below.

Both positions will begin in September 2010. We are especially interested in candidates with research relevant to our involvement in the university's new interdisciplinary initiatives, the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering and the Molecular Life Science and Biophysics Program.

The successful candidate will have a BS in physics and PhD in physics or related discipline, will develop an extramurally funded research program, will supervise undergraduate and graduate research, and will teach undergraduate and graduate courses. Individuals with postdoctoral experience are particularly encouraged to apply. More information about the department can be found at http://www.physics.du.edu . The Department offers degrees through the PhD.

Applicants must apply through the website: https://www.dujobs.org . The application should include: a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of teaching philosophy, proposed research program, and names of at least three references. The selection process will begin on January 15, 2010, and continue until the positions are filled.

The University of Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its faculty and staff and encourages applications from women, minorities, people with disabilities, and veterans. DU is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.

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12. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

[Please remember to replace "_at_" in the below e-mail addresses.]

To submit to AASWOMEN: send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material sent to that address will be posted unless you tell us otherwise (including your email address).

To subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN go to

http://lists.aas.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/aaswlist

and fill out the form.

If you experience any problems, please email itdept_at_aas.org

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13. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN

Past issues of AASWOMEN are available at

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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AASWList mailing list AASWList@aas.org

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Friday, November 20, 2009

What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?

(The following is posted on behalf of the author, Michele Montgomery)

In last week's issue of AASWomen (Issue of November 13, 2009), we listed some items that women can negotiate in their job offer. What we did not address is who should ask for what that depends on which job. For example, what should graduate students negotiate in their job offer for a post-doc position? What should post-docs negotiate in their job offer for faculty positions? What should someone negotiate in a job offer at a planetarium, for an outreach position, at a museum, at a laboratory, at a telescope, for a government position, for a policy position, for a teaching position, etc?
I took a mostly teaching position with some research as I am geographically constrained. Since salary was non-negotiable, I negotiated time: By only teaching on Tuesday/Thursdays, my other days are available for research. Others have made some excellent suggestions, some of which we include here.
David John Helfand from Columbia University offers "teaching assignments! When they start (first semester off to acclimatize?), what is the first course(s), what's the second course, how many different preparations in a typical year (or three-year period), how are teaching assignments decided, how much TA and other support is there, what are typical class sizes and student expectations? etc."
Kristen Larson from Western Washington University suggests, "If the job is an academic one, I would add course load, course assignments, and teaching support such as graders or TA's. Summer support and support for students may also be items to consider. I would add the caveat that some of the items on the list may not be negotiable due to state law and union contracts at public universities. Use caution before pushing too hard against such firm constraints. And timing is everything. Items like spousal accommodation often require approval by multiple layers of
administration and therefore take much more time to resolve in your
favor. Items like teaching assignment, usually left up to the
department chair, can be brought up later as negotiation progresses
and you learn more about the department."
Kris Sellgren from Ohio State adds imporant items to the list with
" - startup money (unrestricted research funds!)
- publication costs

For non-tenure positions:
- the ability to serve as a research advisor to students
- the ability to serve as a PI on external grants

For tenure-track positions:
- teaching relief for the first year
- summer salary for the first year
- early (or delayed) tenure
- funding for an undergraduate research assistantship
- funding for a graduate research assistantship
- funding for a postdoctoral fellowship

Also, your institution may have little or no maternity leave policy. If you want to take time off for N months for maternity leave (paid or unpaid), you had better negiotiate this up-front. In a tenure-track
position, consider asking for a year delay on the tenure clock per
child, as well as some teaching and/or service relief during that year."
Tammy Smecker-Hane of the University of California-Irvine also focuses on teaching duties with her contribution: "Teaching: Most people negotiate to get at least one quarter or semester off of teaching in their first year. Sometimes also in their third year when they'll be busy writing papers to prepare for tenure. Which quarter you get the teaching relief is very important to observers, who might be anticipating long observing campaigns that take them away from campus for extended periods of time. You can also negotiate **which courses** you'll teach the first few years. Make sure to balance lower/upper division undergraduate and graduate student
teaching so you can demonstrate your expertise at each. Another good thing to do is to negotiate to teach two classes in one quarter/semester in order to get a quarter/semester off of teaching. In my experience, that works well when you don't have children, but not when you do."
Lastly, we add that if you are applying for a faculty position, then you might want to read a fantastic article in Science Careers, "Taken for Granted: Shocked, Shocked! to Find Disappointment on Campus" (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2009_11_13/caredit.a0900141). This articles provides good insight into the happiness of faculty at different types of colleges and universities. Bottom line is that your happiness is what you make of it in your position. However, negotiating the job offer can ease some stressors.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

AASWomen Newsletter 11/13/09

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of November 13, 2009
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson & Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1. Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) Strategic Plan

2. What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?

3. Success is in Her DNA

4. A Night to Remember

5. Creating a Climate for Cutting-Edge Research

6. Conversion to Tenure

7. Knowles Science Teaching Foundation 2010 Teaching Fellowships

8. AAO Research Astronomer Appointment(s)

*** FOLLOWING JOB POSTINGS TAKEN FROM WIPHYS ***

9. Program Director, Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation

10. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

11. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN


1. Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) Strategic Plan
From: CSWA [aaswomen_at_aas.org]

The charge, mission statement, objectives, value statement, assets, and weaknesses, key issues, goals, strategies, and action steps have recently been generated in a Strategic Plan of the CSWA. Among the assets of CSWA are this newsletter which reaches over 10% of the AAS membership (and to all our readers, thank you!), the STATUS news letter, our web page, facebook page, and our blog. Among the key issues to be considered by CSWA include promote a balanced working environment, reduce unconscious bias, increase visibility of senior women through e.g., awards and prizes, increase funding opportunities to re-enter the workforce, among others. To see the entire list, please see the Strategic Plan 2009 under Publications at

http://www.aas.org/cswa/

Did we miss an issue? We encourage your feedback! Please respond to the above email.

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2. What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

[We continue to summarize the major outcomes from the Women in Astronomy III conference held at the University of Maryland October 21-23, 2009 - Eds.]

From the WIA III professional skills workshop, a list of negotiation options was developed by Jane Tucker and Associates in their presentation on "Coaching in the Art of Strategic Negotiations." Some of the list is as follows:

  • appointment title(s)
  • start date
  • start salary
  • living expenses
  • housing relocation
  • benefits
  • child care
  • tuition benefits for children
  • spousal job opportunities
  • travel budget
  • facilities/space
  • office furniture and computers
  • parking fees
  • service expectations

What else can you think of? What about non-tenure to tenure status conversion time frame? What should women ask for in the negotiation of any job in any field related to astronomy? We would like to hear your thoughts! Please email them to aaswomen_at_aas.org and please let us know if we can give you credit for your contribution in the next newsletter or blog.

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3. Success is in Her DNA
From: Donald Kniffen [dkniffen_at_usra.edu]

I mentioned this article to Joan [Schmelz] who suggested it might be a good one to post on our web site, but unfortunately the [Washington] Post makes that almost impossible without the ads which are a turn off. But if you follow the link to the story you will get the idea why this is such a great story for women. But is also highlights some of the issues they encounter as we have discussed. [Here is the article:]

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/19/AR2009101903328.html

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4. A Night to Remember
WIPHYS November 9

The November CERN Courier has an article on pp. 19-21 that Hildred Blewitt wrote for the CERN Courier in 1969. Its title is A Night to Remember

http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/40742

(Thank you to Bernice Duran, University of Wisconsin, past CSWP member for sharing this article). Hildred Blewett's generous bequest to the American Physical Society provides scholarships to women returning to a career in physics after an absence. Details at

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/blewett/index.cfm

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5. Creating a Climate for Cutting-Edge Research
From: WIPHYS, November 9

Katharine Gebbie has built a world-class physics laboratory, fostering creativity and risk-taking that has led to cutting-edge scientific discoveries. Read about her and the climate she generates at

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/09/AR2009110900592.html?referrer=emailarticlepg

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6. Conversion to Tenure
Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

Recently, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) subcommittee of the Committee on Contingent Faculty and the Profession prepared a report on the Conversion of Appointments to the Tenure Track (2009). The report addresses the collapsing faculty infrastructure and suggestions to stabilize the faculty including the conversion of tenure. The cite that the last four decades has seen a failure of the social contract in faculty employment and the one-reliable regime of professional peer scrutiny in hiring, evaluation, and promotion has all but collapsed. Statistics include more than 2/3 of faculty work outside the tenure stream and for poor wages. To read more on this timely topic, please see

http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/comm/rep/conversion.htm

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7. Knowles Science Teaching Foundation 2010 Teaching Fellowships
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

Do you know of anyone who has a desire (or hidden desire) to teach high school science or math? Applications are now being accepted for one of the most generous and comprehensive teaching fellowships available for individuals committed to becoming professional high school science or mathematics teachers. KSTF Teaching Fellowships provide up to five years of financial and professional support to exceptional individuals as they begin their careers teaching in U.S. high schools.

Applicants should have at least a bachelor's degree in science, engineering or mathematics and should have received their most recent content degree within the past five years (individuals currently enrolled in a secondary math or science teaching credential program are eligible if they are within five years of their most recent content degree and have not completed their teaching credential before December 2009.) Fellowships will be awarded in physical science (among others). More information on the Fellowship benefits can be found at

http://www.kstf.org/fellowships/teaching.html

For more information, contact

teachers_at_kstf.org

Deadline: Wednesday, January 13, 2010, 5:00pm EST

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8. AAO Research Astronomer Appointment(s)
From: Rohit Deshpande [rohit@physics.ucf.edu]

The Anglo-Australian Observatory is currently advertising for an AAO Research Astronomer (5 year appointment) and an AAO Research Fellow (3 year appointment) within the Astronomy Workgroup:

http://www.aao.gov.au/local/www/jobs/

The closing date for applications to both positions is Friday 11 Dec 2009.

Details of the roles and responsibilities of the positions, as well as the application procedure, can be found on the above web page.

The Observatory comprises the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope and the 1.2-metre UK Schmidt Telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and a laboratory in Epping, about 20km from the centre of Sydney. The AAO is a vibrant and diverse centre of research, with a scientific staff of 12 highly active and productive astronomers, as well as hosting the Australian Gemini Office. Regular interaction with universities, and a twice-yearly Vacation Student program for undergraduates, also provides excellent student supervision opportunities.

Any questions about the positions can be directed to the Head of AAT Science (ahopkins_at_aao.gov.au) and about the application procedure to Suzanne Tritton (jobs_at_aao.gov.au).

The Anglo-Australian Observatory supports flexible working arrangements, including part-time positions where appropriate, and is an equal opportunity employer.

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9. Program Director, Division of Astronomical Sciences, National
Science Foundation
From: WIPHYS, November 9

The National Science Foundation is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Program Director in the Division of Astronomical Sciences (AST), Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Arlington, VA. The candidate selected for this position will have responsibility in one or more of the following areas: coordination of the merit review of proposals, coordination and management of grants programs and projects involving instrumentation and technology development, review and administration of projects involving the design and development of future facility-class instruments or observing capabilities.

The candidate will be involved in activities that include planning, budget development, the merit review and proposal recommendation process, the preparation of written material about the research supported by the Division, and interactions with other NSF programs, Federal agencies and organizations. Program directors are expected to bring their scientific expertise to the activities of the Division, and to serve as a liaison between the astronomical community and NSF, disseminating information about NSF and Division activities and opportunities.

There are opportunities to participate in Foundation or Directorate-wide activities in areas of education, facilities management, strategic planning and program development. Candidates are expected to work with the astronomical research and education community to broaden the diversity of participants in NSF programs. All areas of astronomical expertise will be considered.

The position will be filled on a temporary basis beginning immediately. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent experience in astronomy, astrophysics, or a closely related field, plus six or more years of successful research, research administration, and/or managerial experience beyond the Ph.D.

Individuals interested in applying for this vacancy should submit their materials to announcement E20090115. The position requirements and application procedures are located on the USAJOBS web site. Link:

http://jobview.usajobs.gov/GetJob.aspx?OPMControl=1683386

Applicants should submit a cover letter, CV, names of three references, and a statement of research interests to the

National Science Foundation Division of Human Resources Management 4201 Wilson, Blvd. Arlington, VA 22230

Telephone inquiries may be referred to

Lindsey Boswell 703-292-4350 rotator_at_nsf.gov.

For technical information, contact

Dr. Craig B. Foltz AST Division Director 703-292-4909 cfoltz_at_nsf.gov

(Hearing impaired individuals may call TDD 703-292-8044).

NSF is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The National Science Foundation provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities on a case-by-case basis. If you need a reasonable accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, please notify the point of contact listed on this vacancy announcement.

QUALITY RANKING FACTORS: 1) Knowledge and understanding of scientific principles and theories applicable to astronomy, astrophysics, and physics which have resulted in recognized status in the community of astronomical scientists. 2)Ability to communicate effectively and work productively with the scientific community, peers, and co-workers at all levels to advocate program policies and plans and to fulfill NSF's mission. 3)Ability to organize, implement and manage a proposal-driven grant program, allocating resources to meet a spectrum of goals, including insuring integrity and consistency in the grant award/declination management process. 4)Knowledge of management and organizational concepts, principles, practices and techniques with expertise in large project management and/or research administration.

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10. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

[Please remember to replace "" in the below e-mail addresses.]

To submit to AASWOMEN: send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. All material sent to that address will be posted unless you tell us otherwise (including your email address).

To subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN go to

http://lists.aas.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/aaswlist

and fill out the form.

If you experience any problems, please email itdept_at_aas.org

Back to top.
11. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN

Past issues of AASWOMEN are available at

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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Wednesday, November 11, 2009

What Can I Do? Inspirations from Women in Astronomy III

We found that many postdocs and graduate students would like to do something to promote women in astronomy and help create a female-friendly workplace, but their time was limited. Here are some suggestions.

1. Get your department/company/ organization to endorse the Pasadena Recommendations.

Start by going to the web site and printing out the brochure
http://www.aas.org/cswa/pasadenarecs.html

Note: it is not important that all the recommendations are currently followed; it is important that the principles are supported.

2. Invite your department chair/boss/ research supervisor to attend a CSWA-sponsored session and/or Town Hall at the next AAS meeting.

This information is available on the AAS meeting web site.

3. Get a friend/colleague to subscribe to AASWOMEN, CSWA’s weekly electronic newsletter.

Simply send e-mail to majordomo_at_aas.org, with message in the BODY: subscribe aaswlist your_email_address

4. Comment on a Women_in_ Astronomy blog posting.

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/

5. Attend a career development workshop at an AAS meeting.

6. Get your friends/colleagues to read STATUS, CSWA’s semiannual publication. It consists of original and reprinted articles on topics relating to women in astronomy, in science and/or in society. Then get together to discuss an article.

http://www.aas.org/cswa/STATUS.html

7. Create a brochure of the family-friendly policies at your institution.

8. Put together an e-mail list of the postdocs in your department/ research group and invite them all out for coffee. (Suggested by Amber Straughn, GSFC)

9. Present a lunch talk in your department/research group summarizing the info and outcomes of the Women in Astronomy III conference. (Suggested by Laura Lopez, UCSC)

10. Make a suggestion to add to this list.

Friday, November 6, 2009

AASWOMEN for Nov 6, 2009

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of November 6, 2009
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson & Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1. Addressing Unconscious Bias

2. What Can I Do? Inspirations from Women in Astronomy III

3. Women in Astronomy III -- Results?

4. New Game Plays on Women's Experiences of Gender Bias in Academe

5. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

***The following position was taken from WIPHYS***

6. Chairperson, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University

7. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

8. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN


1. Addressing Unconscious Bias
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

[We continue to summarize the major outcomes from the Women in Astronomy III conference held at the University of Maryland October 21-23, 2009 - Eds.]

For me, the talk by Abigail Stewart from the University of Michigan on "Addressing Unconscious Bias" was well worth the price of admission.

We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews.

Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian" over "Karen" as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. Ref: Steinpreis, Anders, & Ritzke (1999) Sex Roles, 41, 509.

More recently, the unconscious bias against motherhood was evaluated. Resumes for Jane Smith were identical except of one small detail: Active in the PTA. This line indicated that Jane was a mother, and she was rated significantly lower than "non-mother" Jane. When evaluating identical applications: Evaluators rated mothers as less competent and committed to paid work than non-mothers; prospective employers called mothers back about half as often as non-mothers; and mothers were less likely to be recommended for hire, promotion, and management, and were offered lower starting salaries than non-mothers. Ref: Correll, Benard and Paik (2007) American Journal of Sociology, 112 (5), 1297-1338.

New to me in this talk were the results for "father" and "non-father" John. As above, the results were identical except of one line: Active in the PTA. But this time, "father" John got higher ratings than "non-father" John! Fathers were not disadvantaged in the hiring process and were seen as more committed to paid work and offered higher starting salaries than non-fathers. What's a mother to do? Ref: Correll, Benard and Paik (2007) American Journal of Sociology, 112 (5), 1297-1338.

The other great thing about this talk was the list of recommendations on how to begin to eliminate unconscious bias. Increasing the proportion of women raises the ratings of all women. Here's an example for a faculty search committee:

-Awareness: we all want to hire someone who is just like us, so start by shining a light on the problem. Make sure the search committee is as diverse as possible. Recruit from a wider range of institutions. Use open searches with the broadest possible job descriptions;

-Policy: do NOT ask each committee member to find the top three applicants; rather, outline the characteristics for a successful applicant and make an extended short list of the applicants that satisfy those characteristics;

-Practice: insert a phone interview step into the selection process and interview all those applicants on the extended short list;

-Accountability: it is the job of the search committee to create a more diverse department. Cultivate practices that mitigate bias. Monitor both processes and outcomes. Create policies that support fair evaluation processes. Build in accountability for outcomes. Link rewards to outcomes. Link evaluation of leaders to outcomes.

CSWA is hoping to invite Dr. Stewart to speak at an upcoming AAS meeting, perhaps even as a plenary speaker. Would you attend such a talk?

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2. What Can I Do? Inspirations from Women in Astronomy III
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

[AASWOMEN has started a list of suggestions inspired by the comments of attendees of the Women in Astronomy III conference. We found that many postdocs and graduate students would like to do something to promote women in astronomy and help create a more female-friendly workplace, but their time is limited. We decided to generate a list of such activities. Here is the latest - Eds.]

Invite your department chair/boss/research supervisor to attend a CSWA-sponsored session and/or Town Hall at the next AAS meeting.

CSWA is co-sponsoring 2 sessions at the Jan AAS meeting. Here are short descriptions:

Mentoring: morning and afternoon of Wednesday, 6 January 2010 Main organizer: Dara Norman [dnorman@noao.edu]

Whether formal or informal, mentoring relationships are an important part of every scientist's career through graduate school, job searches, and the tenure process. Yet despite its obvious importance, mentor development is often left to chance rather than given the attention and dedication required to be a truly effective mentor. Professional resources exist that can be very useful for mentor development.

The primary goals of these sessions are to 1) provide information and best practices about mentoring and its effectiveness in encouraging successful scientists, and 2) to provide a mini-workshop to discuss and practice implementing these mentoring techniques. Each session provides unique and practical information for those who attend only one, but are complementary and most effective as a unit. We encourage all astronomical researchers and faculty to attend, as well as graduate students, who already mentor more junior colleagues and will continue to do so throughout their careers.

Longitudinal Study: afternoon of Monday, 4 January 2010 Main organizer: Rachel Ivie [rivie@aip.org]

AIP recently completed data collection for the first phase of the longitudinal study of astronomy graduate students, which has been jointly funded by AAS and AIP. The project, which began in 2007, was the result of recommendations made at the 2003 Women in Astronomy Conference. Eventually, the study will track astronomy graduate students over the course of several years. The study has several purposes: to collect data on people who obtain graduate degrees in astronomy, to compare attrition rates for men and women, to collect data on people who leave the field of astronomy, and to collect data on astronomers who work outside the traditional employment sectors of academe and the observatories.

During the first wave of data collection, approximately 700 men and more than 400 women responded, representing 148 different graduate programs. Our preliminary analyses show that women are: less likely to agree that the environment in the department is welcoming, more likely to believe they lack ability, and are less confident in their careers. These results also apply to men who have been in the program more than three years. These and other findings will be discussed at the session, which will include time for audience discussion.

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3. Women in Astronomy III -- Results?
From: Caroline_at_Women_in_Astronomy_Blog, Nov 4, 2009

[The blog is back! Be sure to check out the latest postings - Eds.]

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2009/11/regarding-amydoves-comment-to-wia-2009.html

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4. New Game Plays on Women's Experiences of Gender Bias in Academe
From: Catherine Garland [catherine.garland@castleton.edu]

Robin Wilson of the Chronicle of Higher Education writes, "As a female professor, are you called rude and abrasive while your male colleagues who make similar statements are simply labeled assertive? Has your department head discouraged you from taking an assignment, saying that because you have children you might not be able to handle it? If things like that have happened to you, yell: 'Bingo!'"

The article is available for a limited time on the Chronicle site without a subscription:

http://chronicle.com/article/New-Game-Plays-on-Womens/48966/

The website with the game, however, is open to everyone:

http://www.genderbiasbingo.com/games.html

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5. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott
From: Miller Goss [mgoss@aoc.nrao.edu]; Brigette Hesman [bhesman@aoc.nrao.edu]

Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Division of Radiophysics from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945 she began pioneering radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney; she continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Most probably Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometer observations in radio astronomy at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. The location was at Dover Heights using an Australian Army radar as a radio telescope. A 'sea-cliff' interferometer was used at an eastern facing 100 meter cliff at Dover Heights, Sydney.

Payne-Scott made remarkable contributions to the theory of radio interferometry and collaborated with Joseph Pawsey in the first formulation of the concept of aperture synthesis in mid 1946. She was also an active collaborator with B.Y. Mills, Chris Christiansen, Alec Little, and John Bolton. Payne-Scott and Little developed the first swept lobe interferometer to follow the motions of solar radio bursts of Type II and Type IV at 100 MHz. Payne-Scott played the key role in elucidating the properties of the ubiquitous Type III solar radio bursts; from the short time delays observed (high frequencies observed initially, lower frequencies later), she inferred the slightly relativistic velocities of the exciters of these events in the solar corona.

The book also summarizes the conflicts that Payne-Scott had with the CSIRO hierarchy due to the fact that she was a woman. She was in conflict the CSIRO administration when her marriage from 1944 was discovered in 1950. Payne-Scott left CSIRO when her son was born in late 1951. Also she protested the wage inequality of women in the post World War II era. Other aspects of her life that are described are her membership in the Communist Party of Australia, her passion for bush walking and the success of her two famous children. The authors have attempted to place her scientific achievements and the discrimination she faced in a modern context.

Miller Goss (NRAO) and Richard X. McGee (CSIRO) have recently published this book in the series Astrophysics and Space Science Library of Springer. The book is also available as an e-book to institutions that have a Springer e-book subscription. The book will be launched at Sydney University on 25 November 2009. The book has 354 pages and about 120 figures.

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6. Chairperson, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University
From: WIPHYS Nov 6, 2009

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Appalachian State University

www.physics.appstate.edu < http://www.physics.appstate.edu >

invites applications and nominations for the position of department Chairperson, with a start date of July 1, 2010. Applicants must hold a Ph.D. in Physics, Astronomy, or a related field, and must be eligible for tenure at the rank of Associate or Full Professor.

Applicants must provide evidence of excellence in undergraduate and graduate instruction, research, and outreach, with preference for those with administrative experience. The successful candidate will possess outstanding communication, interpersonal, and mentoring skills in support of faculty, staff, and student development. While providing leadership toward meeting or exceeding departmental and institutional goals, including interdisciplinary teaching and research, the Chairperson will enhance existing levels of external funding, and will develop foundational support, academic collaborations and corporate partnerships. Department Chairpersons normally teach one class per semester and maintain an active research program.

The department offers B.S. degrees in Applied Physics and Secondary Education Physics, a B.A. in Physics, an M.S. in Engineering Physics, and a Professional Science Master's concentration in Instrumentation and Automation. Facilities include, but are not limited to: the Dark Sky Observatory; the state-of-the-art Rankin Astronomy Instructional Facility; a new nanoscience and advanced materials laboratory including extensive electron, ion and scanned probe microscopy facilities; an electrostatics laboratory; an ion trapping laboratory; optoelectronic and spectroscopy research facilities; instrumentation and automation research and instruction labs; and a well-established teaching and demonstration infrastructure.

Examples of faculty research areas include: eclipsing binaries, asteroid research, stellar spectroscopy, exoplanets, atmospheric and environmental physics, archeophysics, biophysics, early universe physics, physics education research, nanoscience, and advanced materials research. The department houses a complete machine shop and electronics shop. In addition, the department hosts the editorial offices of The Physics Teacher magazine. The department has 14 tenure-track faculty members, six part-time faculty, four staff, approximately 75 undergraduate majors, and 20 master's students.

Appalachian State University is a member institution of the 16-campus University of North Carolina System and is located in Boone, NC. Additional information about the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University, and surrounding area can be found on the University's website (www.appstate.edu).

Applicants must send a complete application consisting of: letter of application; current curriculum vitae; three letters of recommendation including names, email addresses, and telephone numbers; and statements of teaching philosophy, administrative philosophy, and research plans that specifically address undergraduate participation to: Dr. Patricia E. Allen, phychairsearch@appstate.edu . Electronic applications required in pdf format only. Complete applications may also be mailed to Dr. Patricia E. Allen, Department of Physics & Astronomy, ASU PO Box 32106, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608.

Review of complete applications will begin November 1, 2009, and will continue until the position is filled. Appalachian State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of excellence among its faculty, staff and students; to the principles of diversity and inclusion; and to maintaining a work and learning environment that is free of all forms of discrimination.

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7. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

[Please remember to replace "_at_" in the below e-mail addresses.]

To submit to AASWOMEN: send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. All material sent to that address will be posted unless you tell us otherwise (including your email address).

To subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN go to

http://lists.aas.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/aaswlist

and fill out the form.

If you experience any problems, please email itdept_at_aas.org

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8. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN

Past issues of AASWOMEN are available at

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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Wednesday, November 4, 2009

WIA 2009 - results?

Regarding amydove's comment to WIA 2009: Criticisms that the meeting didn't really have an outcome: it will. The CSWA has been tasked to develop a Strategic Plan, which includes identification of issues to be addressed, goals to achieve, strategies by which to achieve them, and next actions.

During the meeting, we mined the crowd for ideas for our future vision and work. Issues that came up (which include some of the ones you have seen here) are:
  • the importance of mentoring, but lack of a reward system to do it;
  • the effect of unconscious bias (but not much on how to address it; hmmm);
  • the over-emphasis on the "traditional" academic career path and corresponding lack of recognition and inclusion of people pursuing "non-traditional" paths*;
  • that as women pursue a work-life balance, they tend to be more negatively impacted than men**
This is not an all-inclusive list; just a sample. When our stragetic plan is finalized, we'll post it here and in AASWomen. Let us know your ideas for what needs to be done next. What will the summary of WIA 2009 outcomes be at the next WIA meeting?

* since the traditional path is taken by a minority of people, then shouldn't we redefine "traditional" -- it certainly doesn't mean "usual" or "normal!"

** one thing from the meeting that struck me was that men with children are viewed more positively than men without (it's a marker of stability and maturity), while women with children are viewed more negatively (she'll have extra demands on her time).