Friday, March 12, 2021

AASWomen Newsletter for March 12, 2021

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 12, 2021

eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson, Alessandra Aloisi, and Jeremy Bailin

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. Be well! --eds.]

This week's issues:
Item #6. Credit: womeninmotionmovie.com

1. Cross-post: Beyond Marie Curie: The women in science history we don't talk about

2. International Women's Day I: Profiles of women making current contributions to astronomy

3. International Women's Day II: Profiles of women who have made historical contributions to astronomy

4. Scientists want virtual meetings to stay after the COVID pandemic

5. Women in Aerospace: Stories from the Smithsonian Collection

6. From sci-fi to science: Film presentation shows how Nichelle Nichols changed the face of space

7. Physics camp has proven benefits for high school girls

8. Empowering women leads to better science, research and innovation

9. Making it Happen: Women in STEM Shorts Program at Athena Film Festival

10. Where Women Scientists Are the Majority

11. New DPS Mid-career Prize: The Claudia J. Alexander Prize

12. Physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein spans the whitewashed history of astronomy in her new book, ‘The Disordered Cosmos.’

13. Data shows women making gains in STEM workforce but still underrepresented

14. Job Opportunities

15. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

16. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

17. Access to Past Issues

An online version of this newsletter will be available at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ at 3:00 PM ET every Friday.


1. Cross-post: Beyond Marie Curie: The women in science history we don't talk about
From Sarah Rigby via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

"Beyond the exceptional talents of Marie Curie, Rosalind Franklin and Ada Lovelace, it’d be easy to think that women didn’t used to participate in science. But as science historians Leila McNeill and Anna Reser reveal to Sara Rigby, women have contributed to our understanding of the world, stretching all the way back to antiquity."

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2021/03/cross-post-beyond-marie-curie-women-in.html

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2. International Women's Day I: Profiles of women making current contributions to astronomy
From: Jeremy Bailin via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In celebration of International Women's Day on March 8, 2021, there have been a number of recent profiles of women making current contributions to astronomy. We collect here articles profiling many including Pontsho Maruping, Adriana Marais, Ruvimbo Samanga, Prajval Shastri, Rohini Godbole, Fran├žoise Combes, and Sarah Brough.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2021/03/international-womens-day-i-profiles-of.html

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3. International Women's Day II: Profiles of women who have made historical contributions to astronomy
From: Jeremy Bailin via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In celebration of International Women's Day on March 8, 2021, there have been a number of recent profiles of women who have made historical contributions to astronomy and space science. We collect here articles profiling many including Lisa Hardaway, Mae Jemison, Katherine Johnson, Maria Mitchell, and Vera Rubin.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2021/03/international-womens-day-ii-profiles-of.html

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4. Scientists want virtual meetings to stay after the COVID pandemic
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

By Ariana Remmel

Although researchers are getting ‘Zoom fatigue’ just like everyone else, they’ve learnt to appreciate virtual science conferences during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a poll of more than 900 Nature readers. After navigating a year of online research presentations, the majority of survey respondents — 74% — think that scientific meetings should continue to be virtual, or have a virtual component, after the pandemic ends. Readers cite the ease of attending from anywhere in the world as a major perk, although they admit that virtual events haven’t been able to simulate the networking with colleagues they enjoyed in person.

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-00513-1

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5. Women in Aerospace: Stories from the Smithsonian Collection
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

Join Smithsonian Affiliations for a fascinating discussion with Dr. Margaret Weitekamp, Curator and Department Chair of the Space History Department at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. Dr. Weitekamp has researched and written on how a groundswell of support helped create a Lego set representing women’s contributions to aerospace. She'll discuss how women have worked from the very beginning of aviation to innovate, and how museums have documented their stories.

Read more at

https://smithsonian.zoom.us/webinar/register/2516129720678/WN_zXqmEc6lSHymljxEAl56kA

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6. From sci-fi to science: Film presentation shows how Nichelle Nichols changed the face of space
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Tara Evans

"The City of Orlando plans to observe Women’s History Month, in part, by showing a film from a local filmmaker that highlights the contributions of Star Trek actress Nichelle Nichols to NASA. WOMAN IN MOTION: Nichelle Nichols, Star Trek and the Remaking of NASA will show as part of the Dr. Phillips Center Frontyard Festival Thursday, March 11 at 7:30 p.m. The film is directed and produced by Todd Thompson, and shows how Nichols took her career in sci-fi television to a career in science itself."

Read more at

https://www.clickorlando.com/entertainment/2021/03/05/from-sci-fi-to-science-film-presentation-shows-how-nichelle-nichols-changed-the-face-of-space

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7. Physics camp has proven benefits for high school girls
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

A recent study published in Physical Review Physics Education Research looked at the effectiveness of Rice University's two-week physics day camp for high school girls and found an increase in their performance in high school physics relative to a matched group of girls who didn't attend.

Read more at

https://news.rice.edu/2021/03/05/physics-camp-has-proven-benefits-for-high-school-girls

Read the original paper ata

https://journals.aps.org/prper/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.17.010111

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8. Empowering women leads to better science, research and innovation
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Mariya Gabriel, EU commissioner for research and innovation

"Last year was a remarkable year for women in science. Two scientists, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna, one from the EU and one from the US, received a Nobel Prize for their discovery on the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors. It was the first time that the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to two women in the same year in its 119-year history. It is amazing to see how the impact of women in science has grown exponentially since Marie Curie became the first women to receive a Nobel Prize in 1903. It sends an important message to younger generations of women and the world: We need your skills, talents and solutions.

While gender equality is important in and of itself, I would like to stress that having more women in science serves another, maybe even greater purpose: better science."

Read more at

https://sciencebusiness.net/viewpoint/empowering-women-leads-better-science-research-and-innovation

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9. Making it Happen: Women in STEM Shorts Program at Athena Film Festival
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

Available from March 1st-31st, this series of four short films shows "the stories of fierce and fearless women working in STEM, the discoveries they make and the challenges they face as they uncover the truth about our world and break down social barriers."

Read more at

https://watch.athenafilmfestival.com/tv/making-it-happen-women-in-stem-shorts-program/1

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10. Where Women Scientists Are the Majority
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

"Women physicists from Lebanon, Palestine, Pakistan, and Egypt share their thoughts about being scientists in places where women make up a much larger share of STEM graduates than in Europe and in the US."

Read more at

https://physics.aps.org/articles/v14/35?utm_campaign

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11. New DPS Mid-career Prize: The Claudia J. Alexander Prize
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

The Division for Planetary Sciences of the AAS seeks nominations for prizes, including a new mid-career achievement prize named for famed planetary scientist Claudia Alexander.

Read more at

https://dps.aas.org/prizes

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12. Physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein spans the whitewashed history of astronomy in her new book, ‘The Disordered Cosmos.’
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

"The cosmological work that I do is in part a product of settler colonialism, a form of colonialism that seeks to not only control territory but also replace its Indigenous population. If that seems difficult to accept, consider this: I am in part a product of settler colonialism. As I discuss more in “The Physics of Melanin,” my pale appearance is not merely due to my father’s genetic makeup, but also my mother’s. Growing up into a Black woman who is also a particle cosmologist has required grappling with all of the threads of history that bring me to where I am. How do we have all of the knowledge that we have? Why are there so many men in my history of twentieth-century cosmology and almost no women?"

Read more at

https://www.popsci.com/story/space/disordered-cosmos-excerpt

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13. Data shows women making gains in STEM workforce but still underrepresented
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Thalia Brionez

"In recent years, an increasing number of women have entered the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math, otherwise known as STEM.

While the percentage of women in the STEM workforce continues to make gains, we still have a long way to go for full representation.

Despite making up nearly half of the U.S. workforce, women are still vastly underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau."

Read more at

https://www.kxxv.com/news/data-shows-women-are-making-gains-in-stem-workforce-but-are-still-underrepresented

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14. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity

- Public Engagement Program Manager, American Physical Society https://aps.applicantstack.com/x/detail/a270i42jhmv8 - Lecturer in Planetary Science, Open University UK http://www.open.ac.uk/about/employment/vacancies/lecturer-planetary-science-18106

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15. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org .

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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16. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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17. Access to Past Issues

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/AASWOMEN

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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