Friday, April 21, 2017

AASWomen Newsletter for April 21, 2017

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 21, 2017
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. Addressing Sexual Violence in Science

2. NSF modifies Alan T. Waterman Award eligibility criteria

3. Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems

4. Pigeon study takes on sexism in science

5. Job Opportunities

6. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

8. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Addressing Sexual Violence in Science
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Maggy Hardy, a research fellow in the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland in Australia, outlines "ways that we can talk about rape and sexual harassment in academe." In particular, she offers "practical suggestions for academics to address sexual violence and support students who have experienced such violence."

Read more at

https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2017/04/14/advice-those-who-work-science-disciplines-dealing-sexual-violence-essay

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2. NSF modifies Alan T. Waterman Award eligibility criteria
From: Maria Patterson [mtpatter_at_uw.edu]

The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced an update to eligibility requirements for the Alan T. Waterman Award, which "annually recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by NSF." National Science Board Chair Maria Zuber remarks, "This was motivated in part by community comments noting that only two women have won the Waterman award in the last 15 years. By allowing 'Ph.D. plus ten years' instead of 'plus 7' and moving from age 35 to 40, I think we are accounting for how much early research careers have changed since we last adjusted eligibility rules in 1999."

Read more at

https://nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=191685

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3. Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems
From: Maria Patterson [mtpatter_at_uw.edu]

A study published this week in "Science" demonstrated that "common machine learning programs, when trained with ordinary human language available online, can acquire cultural biases embedded in the patterns of wording", as measured by a machine learning version of the Implicit Association Test. The researchers found that the biases "range from the morally neutral, like a preference for flowers over insects, to the objectionable views of race and gender."

Read about the study at

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-biased-bots-human-prejudices-artificial.html

Find the original paper at

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6334/183

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4. Pigeon study takes on sexism in science
From: Maria Patterson [mtpatter_at_uw.edu]

"In experimental research, scientists tend to assume that- unless they are looking specifically at reproduction or sexual behavior- male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males. But a new study by researchers at the University of California, Davis and the University of New Hampshire, published April 18 in Scientific Reports, shows surprisingly big differences in tissue gene expression between male and female rock doves. The work is part of an attempt to make science more gender-inclusive and aware of physiological and other differences between the sexes."

Read more at

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-pigeon-sexism-science-big-differences.html

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5. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Lecturer/Instructor in Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign http://go.illinois.edu/AstrInstLec

-Director of the Central Development Laboratory, NRAO, Charlottesville, VA http://jobs.jobvite.com/nrao/job/owuK4fwy

-CASA Lead, NRAO, Charlottesville, VA or Socorro, NM http://jobs.jobvite.com/nrao/job/oWuT4fw7

-ALMA, Head of Data Management Group, Santiago, Chile http://jobs.jobvite.com/nrao/job/ohKR4fwG

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6. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aaswlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

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8. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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