Friday, September 23, 2016

AASWOMEN Newsletter for September 23, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 23, 2016
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. "First" Impressions

2. Help SGMA Assess Institutional Gender Identity and Expression Policies

3. A New Graduate School Policy on Parental Accommodation from Northwestern University

4. Cards Against Humanity Scholarship Seeks to Send Women in STEM to College

5. How Neil DeGrasse Tyson Champions Women & Geeks In 'StarTalk' Season 3

6. Study shows unexpected path for women to major in science

7. Job Opportunities

8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues


1. "First" Impressions

From: Sarah Tuttle via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

For people who are not minoritized, sometimes it can be difficult to imagine what inclusion and exclusion feel like. Here I share two recent experiences of mine that led to very strong feelings of inclusion and exclusion. They are everyday moments. But because of my past experience, both of them were hard to miss. And both of them changed how I experienced the rest of my day, and the space that I inhabit at work.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/09/first-impressions.html

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2. Help SGMA Assess Institutional Gender Identity and Expression Policies

From: Jessica Mink via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

At the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Diversity Summit last fall, its Committee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA) decided to take on the project of improving institutional policies regarding gender identity and expression across the field of astronomy. We are starting that project with a request to readers of the Women in Astronomy blog to let us know the policies at their institution. I have set up a web survey to accept your answers. No personal information will be recorded.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/09/help-sgma-assess-institutional-gender.html

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3. A New Graduate School Policy on Parental Accommodation from Northwestern University

From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

"The parental accommodation policy aims to support active graduate students of all gender identities and gender expressions in The Graduate School who become new parents (whether by childbirth or adoption) by providing a period of parental accommodation, roughly equivalent to the length of a quarter, during which funding may continue (for funded students) and TGS milestone deadlines will be extended (for all parents). This policy is separate from any student absences that are medically necessary due to pregnancy or childbirth - all such absences are accommodated at Northwestern through The Graduate School's Leave of Absence policy."

Read more at

http://www.tgs.northwestern.edu/about/policies/childbirth-accomodation.html

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4. Cards Against Humanity Scholarship Seeks to Send Women in STEM to College

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Maki Naro

"I haven't played Cards Against Humanity in years, but I still follow everything they do. In addition to peddling the controversial card game, CAH, the company, is known for its publicity stunts-such as raising prices on Black Friday or selling boxes of actual cow dung-as well as for some really cool humanitarian endeavors. My favorite being their new Science Ambassador Scholarship.

The makers of the "party game for horrible people" founded this program in 2014 with the aim of giving one woman studying science, technology, engineering, or math up to four years tuition money. The scholarship is funded by the sales of the game's "Science Pack" a 30-card booster written by fellow science cartoonist Zach Weinersmith and astronomer Phil Plait."

Read more at

http://www.popsci.com/cards-against-humanity-scholarship-seeks-to-send-women-in-stem-to-college

Apply for the Science Ambassador Scholarship here

http://www.scienceambassadorscholarship.org

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5. How Neil DeGrasse Tyson Champions Women & Geeks In 'StarTalk' Season 3

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Alexi McCammond

"I've long been a self-described nerd, even if that wasn't always the "cool" thing to be growing up. So when I watched Neil deGrasse Tyson's StarTalk Season 3, which aired on Sept. 19, I felt like I had found new friends. Science - especially astrophysics, which is Tyson's expertise - can be a foreign field to many, particularly when you consider it has historically been a field dominated by white men. But StarTalk turns that stereotype on its head, as Tyson uses his show to champion science-savvy women and geeks without tokenizing them."

Read more at

http://www.bustle.com/articles/185680-how-neil-degrasse-tyson-champions-women-geeks-in-startalk-season-3

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6. Study shows unexpected path for women to major in science

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by D'lyn Ford

"A North Carolina State University study of factors that influence women's decisions to major in science found an intriguing backdoor pathway: women gravitating to the sciences after being undecided about what to study when entering college.

"We can't ignore the fact that women are less likely to major in science, persist in science and earn degrees in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math," says Joy Gaston Gayles, lead author of the research in NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education. "But this study indicates that there may be promising nontraditional options for attracting and retaining women in science."

The research uses data from the National Center for Education Statistics' Beginning Postsecondary Students longitudinal survey, which tracks a cohort of students for six years after they start college."

Read more at

http://phys.org/news/2016-09-unexpected-path-women-major-science.html#jCp

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7. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Faculty Opening in Planetary Science, The Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA
https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/7724

- Assistant Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland
http://www.astro.umd.edu/employment

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8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

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10. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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