Friday, September 4, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for September 4, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 4, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. When Misogyny is a Symptom of Narcissism

2. Self-care with Drs. Sarah

3. APS News: Inclusive Astronomy Conference Confronts Diversity Issues

4. 'Ask Me': What LGBTQ Students Want Their Professors to Know

5. Bleeding Wounds and Breastfeeding Hell: The Costs of No Paid Maternity Leave in America

6. Job Opportunities

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. When Misogyny is a Symptom of Narcissism
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Today's guest blogger is Anonymous. Anonymous has a PhD in chemistry and recently completed a postdoc at an unnamed national lab. She is leaving science after realizing that her interests lie elsewhere, but it's all good. She's interested in community organizing, the bugs in our neural programming, and the ways we transform our painful experiences into growth and value.]

We hadn't been friends for very long. In retrospect, a few warning signs had been quietly visible, but I generally don't go into friendships expecting toxic behavior. Which is why it surprised me when, over lunch, he explained to me how I'd gotten into college.

"Maybe it's because you're a female."

Surprise and anger rose inside of me, but since we were friends, I decided to reply very carefully. "What do you mean by that?"

"I'm saying that soooometimes, women and minorities are held to a lower standard in admissions."

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.ca/2015/08/when-misogyny-is-symptom-of-narcissism.html#more

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2. Self-care with Drs. Sarah
From: Sarah Ballard [sarahba_at_mit.edu]

"Self-care with Drs. Sarah" is a series of conversations between women scientists about navigating and surviving science culture. We (Sarah B. and Sarah R.) are astrophysicists and best friends who navigated graduate school together. In some episodes, we chat between the two of us about topics relevant to self-care for women scientists, and in other episodes, we interview our friends and colleagues about how they care for themselves. Topics include the Impostor Syndrome, microaggressions, strategies for navigating conferences, and self-care practices particularly tailored for parents, scientist activists, and folks grappling with mental health issues. While the dynamic between the two co-hosts is often the jokey and informal style of good friends, the podcast also references peer-reviewed research on the scientific experiences of marginalized groups.

Check out the Podcast website at

http://drssarahcare.tumblr.com

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3. APS News: Inclusive Astronomy Conference Confronts Diversity Issues
From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

By Emily Conover

Astrophysicist Jedidah Isler has not always felt welcomed by the scientific community. "Being part of a minority group can feel very daunting and very lonely," says Isler, an African-American woman and a postdoc at Vanderbilt University. And although scientific communities — physics and astronomy included — have paid great attention to the status of women in recent years, other underrepresented groups have remained in the shadows. Among those are scientists who are members of racial or ethnic minorities, who are lesbian/gay/bisexual/transsexual/intersex/queer or questioning (LGBTIQ), who are neuroatypical (e.g., have autism), and who belong to more than one underrepresented group — like African-American women such as Isler.

But change is on the horizon. Isler and others recently convened the inaugural Inclusive Astronomy conference, held June 17 - 19 at Vanderbilt University, to explore how to make astronomy accessible to all. Following two influential Women in Astronomy meetings in recent years, the group "felt that the field was really ready to think about ... diversity and inclusion more broadly," says Keivan Stassun, a professor of physics and astronomy at Vanderbilt and the chair of the local organizing committee for the meeting.

To read more, please see

http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201508/astronomy.cfm

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4. 'Ask Me': What LGBTQ Students Want Their Professors to Know
From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

[This is a wonderful video project published by The Chronicle of Higher Education. -Eds]

The federal law known as Title IX is meant to protect students from discrimination based on their gender identity. But many gay, lesbian, and transgender students say they face an array of challenges and safety issues on their campuses. The Chronicle interviewed more than a dozen of them to hear more about what keeps them from thriving in college. Here's a glance at some of the many issues they talked about:

'More Shades of Lavender'

Shane Windmeyer, executive director of the advocacy group Campus Pride, says research data are driven by binary thinking that does not reflect the increasingly varied identities that students are embracing. "Society is changing how we view gender identity and expression, and these young people are speaking out," he says. "There are more shades of lavender out there."

To read more and watch the video, please visit:

http://chronicle.com/article/Ask-Me-What-LGBTQ-Students/232797

A transcript of the video above is available here:

http://chronicle.com/items/biz/worddoc/AskMeTranscript.doc

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5. Bleeding Wounds and Breastfeeding Hell: The Costs of No Paid Maternity Leave in America
From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

by Emily Crockett

"Every morning I get up, I drink coffee, and I get mad that women don't have better access to health care and paid family leave," Danielle Spradlin told RH Reality Check.

Spradlin, on this particular Wednesday morning, was mad about a recent investigative report from In These Times magazine revealing that about one in four working women return to work two weeks or less after giving birth.

To read more, please see

http://rhrealitycheck.org/article/2015/08/31/bleeding-wounds-breastfeeding-hell-costs-paid-maternity-leave-america

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6. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

* Two tenure-track positions in Astronomy and Planetary Science at Northern Arizona University https://jobregister.aas.org/job_view?JobID=51443

* Tenure-line Faculty Position in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Northwestern University http://ciera.northwestern.edu/Research/faculty_position.php

* Assistant Professor, Princeton University http://www.princeton.edu/astro/resources/job/jo/index.xml

* Faculty Position in Astrophysics, Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology, New York University https://jobregister.aas.org/job_view?JobID=51662

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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