Friday, April 3, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for April 3, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 3, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:



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From: Organizers of the Inclusive Astronomy meeting via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The inaugural Inclusive Astronomy meeting is coming up in less than three months: June 17-19, 2015 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee!  This meeting is being planned in response to the reality that marginalized people face -isms and -phobias which function as barriers to their participation in astronomy.  As organizers, we are excited for this meeting and hope that it will be the first of many.  

The content of the meeting is being organized under four broad topical areas: barriers to access; inclusion and access to power, policy, and leadership; creating inclusive climates; and establishing a community of inclusive practice.  

Read more at


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From:  Brittany Kamai via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

…the academic world is a giant party! At first glance, you may not see what I mean, but here is a way I have reframed the situation to make it less intimidating. What I reference here as "the party" is the scientific world itself. It's a strange new environment that doesn’t make sense. Party goers may appear unapproachable and may even be speaking a different language. The party itself may seem daunting and overwhelming. Forget all that!

Read how to be more than a wallflower at


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From: Nancy Morrison via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This post is from the January 2015 Issue of Status: A Report on Women in Astronomy. 

In the spring of 2012, the AAS was invited to contribute a supporting document, or “testimony,” in preparation for a conference, Seeking Solutions: Maximizing American Talent by Advancing Women of Color in Academia, which was organized by an ad hoc committee of the National Academies. We were asked: to provide statistics on the education and employment of women of color in astronomy; to describe the barriers and difficulties facing women of color in our profession; and to recommend policies for professional societies and funding agencies. 

Read more at


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From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

According to a new study by psychologists at Indiana University, vocalized stereotyping lowered the math scores of female test takers. Test-takers participated in a study aimed at better understanding why women are worse at math, and when women were told they're worse at math, they were -- on average -- worse at math than women who weren't subjected to the same put-down. Interestingly, the surveys revealed that both men and women thought female test takers would be motivated to prove the doubters wrong, so to speak -- that stereotyping would encourage higher scores.

Read more at 


Read the science article at


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From:  Angela Mennecke via Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellows LinkedIn Group

After noticing the lack of science-themed clothing options for their daughters, two Seattle moms took a hands-on approach to the problem. They worked with experts in areas ranging from pattern-making and textile design to logistics and supply-chain management, and launched a Kickstarter campaign to bring their vision to life. So far, they have raised almost half of their $45,000 goal. Their company, buddingSTEM, offers girls’ clothing that celebrates "science, space, dinosaurs, and other things all kids love!"

Read more at 


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From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

“Women are playing an increasing role in science today but there are still barriers that can prevent them from achieving success comparable to their male colleagues. This feeds the argument that there is a gender pay gap in earnings in science, although that doesn't tell the full story of the challenges facing women scientists.”

Read more at


Read about the pay gap in Australia at 


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From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

"It's not that I don't think there's a glass ceiling," Wendy Capland, CEO of Vision Quest Consulting, explains. "More women now graduate from college than men, and women are the breadwinners in almost 50% of American households. But only 22% of executives in Corporate America are women, so that number is pitiful."

She says that we suffer not only from the glass ceiling, but also from what some call "sticky-floor syndrome."

Read more at


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From: Matthew Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

If you are considering careers in NASA and other government agencies, a new report from the Office of Personnel Management shows that women “are making progress breaking into Uncle Sam’s top leadership echelons”. 

Read more at


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From: Association for Women in Science  

The average person spends over ninety thousand hours of their lifetime at work. Our partners at New Scientist asked 5800 scientists and engineers in the UK, Europe, and North American about their salaries, jobs, and employers. The New Scientist 2015 Careers Guide offers insights on how to land a pay rise, promotion, or launch a new career. You will also be able to compare your salary to other science professionals. Additional articles in the New Scientist 2015 Careers Guide discuss overcoming the wage gap, and the different barriers women face in science and engineering fields.

Read more at


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From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard@_at_amherst.edu]

Linda Hallman, CEO of the American Association of University Women, and Scott McGregor, President and CEO of Broadcom Corporation, report that “[m]ore girls and women than ever before are studying and excelling in science, technology, engineering and applied mathematics (STEM) studies, but those gains are not being reflected in the workforce.”

Read more at 


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Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.