Friday, February 6, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for February 06, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 06, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. Rising Stargirls: Girls of All Colors Learning, Exploring, and Discovering

2. The State of the Universe

3. Women in Aviation and Space Heritage Family Days

4. Of Relevance to Women of Color in STEM

5. New NASA Volunteer Reviewer Forms Posted

6. Please Consider Becoming a Harlow Shapley Visiting Lecturer!

7. Young, Gifted, and Black: Facing Microaggressions as a Young College Professor

8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues


1. Rising Stargirls: Girls of All Colors Learning, Exploring, and Discovering

From: Aomawa Shields via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

My primary goal as a scientist is to find the next planet where life exists. I also have another goal, which sometimes feels even more important: To nurture young life on this planet, by encouraging young girls of color to look beyond social and media perceptions of what a scientist is, has been, or isn’t, and to see themselves as potential scientists – especially astronomers.

Given that kids from groups traditionally underrepresented in the sciences often stop pursuing their interest in STEM fields long before they enter college, due to a lack of self-confidence and few role models who look like them (Weir 2007), there is a critical need for an innovative approach to astronomy education that targets young girls from underrepresented groups at an early age.

Read more at:

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/rising-stargirls-girls-of-all-colors.html

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2. The State of the Universe

From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

For the second consecutive year, the AAS in partnership with the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) and the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, bring you The State of the Universe, a briefing on the astronomical sciences. Our speakers will highlight exciting new discoveries and provide first-hand perspectives on the power of astronomy as a gateway science and the importance of bringing a broad and diverse set of viewpoints to bear on exciting scientific challenges. Through inspirational imagery and elegant descriptions of our universe, the astronomical sciences draw millions of students to the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields, preparing them for a wide range of careers in many sectors of the economy that support our nation's prosperity.

Read more at:

http://womenin astronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/the-state-of-universe.html

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3. Women in Aviation and Space Heritage Family Days

From: Rick Fienberg [rick.fienberg_at_aas.org]

Join us for a family day that celebrates the accomplishments of women in aviation and space exploration. From the days of the earliest pilots to today's space program women have been making significant contributions. During this event, visitors will have the opportunity to meet female role models and learn about the women who inspired them.

Saturday, March 14, 2015 10:00 am to 3:00 pm Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA Admission: Free, Parking $15

For more information:

http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/womens-history

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4. Of Relevance to Women of Color in STEM

From: Saeqa Vrtilek [svrtilek_at_cfa.harvard.edu]

This is an issue of the APS CSWP (Committee on the Status of Women in Physics) from 2010 that was devoted to gender and color issues. Including a editorial by me on the participation of Women and Minorities in Physics. In particular this is one tidbit of information:

In 2010, 63% of African American women, 62% of Hispanic American women, 48% of White American women, and only 36% of Asian American women who earned PhDs since 1977 held faculty positions.

To read more:

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/reports/gazette/upload/spring10.pdf

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5. New NASA Volunteer Reviewer Forms Posted

From: Christina Richey [christina.r.richey_at_nasa.gov]

The Science Mission Directorate is seeking subject matter experts to serve as mail-in and/or panel meeting reviewers of research proposals in Earth and Space science. We have posted new volunteer reviewer forms for ROSES 2014 Habitable Worlds and Astrophysics Research and Analysis calls and the Earth and Space Science graduate student fellowship programs (NESSF). To volunteer just fill out the forms at:

http://science.nasa.gov/researchers/volunteer-review-panels

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6. Please Consider Becoming a Harlow Shapley Visiting Lecturer!

From: Gina Brissenden [gina.brissenden_at_aas.org]

The AAS Harlow Shapley Visiting Lectureship Program is a gem in the crown of the Society’s education efforts. Its purpose is to bring the excitement of modern astronomy and astrophysics to North American colleges and universities of all types through a 2- to 3-day visit by a professional astronomer. The AAS is particularly interested in reaching out to institutions that do not offer degrees in astronomy, as well as to community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

The AAS pays the lecturer’s travel expenses regardless of the type of institution where the Shapley Lecture will be given. Institutions are requested to pay a nominal $300 contribution in support of the Shapley Lectureship fund. However, this contribution can be reduced or eliminated depending on the needs of the institution, and the AAS generally waives the contribution for community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

Read more at:

http://aas.org/posts/opportunity/2015/01/please-consider-becoming-harlow-shapley-visiting-lecturer

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7. Young, Gifted, and Black: Facing Microaggressions as a Young College Professor

From: Meredith Hughes [amhughes_at_wesleyan.edu]

By Saaraa Bailey

White. Male. Middle-Aged.

Despite the year being 2015, this remains the prototype of professorship at most colleges and universities in the U.S. Those who exist outside this identity are often devalued in higher education and prone to a series of unpleasantries that many of us know as microaggressions.

These microaggressions are perhaps the height of mistreatment faced by the young black woman professor, issued by colleagues and students alike. Below are a list of the most common microaggressions lobbied at me.

Read the rest at:

http://www.forharriet.com/2015/01/young-gifted-and-black-facing.html

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8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

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To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

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10. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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