Friday, October 17, 2014

AASWOMEN Newsletter for October 17, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women

Issue of October 17, 2014
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. One Man's Perspective on Diversity and Inequality in Science

2. Resource Guide for Websites for Women in STEM (with an emphasis on Astronomy)

3. Getting educated in gender equity - one scientist shares his experience

4. Why are Women Leaving Science, Engineering, and Tech Jobs?

5. 12 inspirational quotes from women who rock STEM

6. Job Opportunities

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. One Man's Perspective on Diversity and Inequality in Science

From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Today's Guest Post is by Ramin Skibba, a research scientist at the Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences at the University of California, San Diego. He blogs about astronomy news and science policy issues at http://raminskibba.net.]

It's obvious, but one thing I've noticed over my career so far is that many departments, institutions, conferences, organizations, committees, high-profile publications, big research grants, etc., both nationally and internationally, and especially leadership positions, are filled with straight, white, men. There are notable and impressive exceptions, but the trend is clear. The distributions of people in the scientific workforce clearly don't reflect their distribution in the overall population. For example, according to the AAS's Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy, nearly half of undergraduate students who obtain bachelors of science degrees are women, but only a third of astronomy graduate students and 30% of Ph.D. recipients are.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/10/one-mans-perspective-on-diversity-and.html

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2. Resource Guide for Websites for Women in STEM (with an emphasis on Astronomy)

From: Christina Richey via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

As someone who has spoken up for women within our field, people tend to come to me for advice from time to time. One question that I have repeatedly received is "do you know of one great STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) resource for women in our field or young women looking to enter this profession?" And every time I say "no, I know of way more than one, " then Google every website I can think of that I have found useful previously. The person usually leaves with their head swimming full of websites, and likely forgets most of what I said within minutes (but now knows I have a strange relationship with my iPhone and Google). So I'm going to use my blog time this month to include the many sites that I have found useful, add some others that have been suggested to me along the way, and hopefully readers will take the opportunity to chime in on the comments section of this blog to add their own useful sites.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/10/resource-guide-for-websites-for-women.html

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3. Getting educated in gender equity - one scientist shares his experience

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com ]

by Bryan Gaensler

[Professor Bryan Gaensler is an Australian Laureate Fellow at The University of Sydney, where he was the founding director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO). He received his PhD from The University of Sydney in 1998, and subsequently held positions at MIT, the Smithsonian Institution and Harvard University before returning to Australia in 2006. In January 2015, he will commence as director of the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Toronto...]

Until 2003, I didn't give two hoots about gender equity. There weren't many women in physics, but that was perhaps because women weren't very good at physics. And if there were more sinister reasons for the imbalance, they certainly had nothing to do with me. I treated everyone fairly and equally. If only everyone else did the same, there'd be no problem.

I can pinpoint the exact moment when my worldview got turned upside down.

Read more at

http://womeninscienceaust.org/2014/10/11/getting-educated-in-gender-equity-one-scientist-shares-his-experience

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4. Why are Women Leaving Science, Engineering, and Tech Jobs?

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com ]

by Jane Porter

Recent research from the Center for Talent Innovation shows U.S. women working in science, engineering, and tech fields are 45% more likely than their male peers to leave the industry within the year.

It's not for lack of enthusiasm or passion. Of those women surveyed, 80% say they love their work, yet many still report barriers to getting to the top.

"Women entering STEM fields have a much shorter runway for career takeoff than women entering other industries," according to the report. "To begin with, they're starting later because of the time it took to get a Ph.D. That intensifies the ticking of their biological clock, which in turn pressures them to step up the pace of their research progress."

Companies like Merck, Johnson & Johnson, and Pfizer have been putting programs in place to help balance out this pipeline of leadership. But a number of factors need to be addressed before the issue can be resolved.

Read more at

http://www.fastcompany.com/3037075/strong-female-lead/why-are-women-are-leaving-science-engineering-tech-jobs

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5. 12 inspirational quotes from women who rock STEM

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com ]

by Sheena McKenzie and Phoebe Parke

Editor's note: In celebration of International Day of the Girl (October 11) and Ada Lovelace Day (October 14), Leading Women is devoting the month of October to women and girls in STEM: science, technology, engineering and math.

Girls don't do science.

If that's the stereotype, then good luck telling that to these women.

From space archaeologists, to racing car drivers, and Higgs Boson physicists, here are 12 ladies with some of the world's coolest jobs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

But it wasn't always this way. Growing up, some were told "You're OK for a girl," or "If you're beautiful, you can't also be smart."

Luckily for us, they didn't take much notice.

Take a look at their most inspirational quotes here:

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/01/tech/12-inspirational-quotes-from-women

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6. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Instructor Positions in Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics, University of South Florida http://physics.usf.edu/news/open

-Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics - 1 Year Position, Syracuse University http://web.physics.syr.edu/job-opps/Visiting%20Assistant%20Professor%20of%20Physics_1-%20Year.pdf

-Assistant Professor, Physics Dept, Virginia Tech https://listings.jobs.vt.edu/postings/52301

-Tenure-Track Faculty Position, Department of Physics, CSU San Bernardino http://physics.csusb.edu/employment.html

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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