Friday, April 25, 2014

AASWOMEN Newsletter April 25, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 25, 2014
eds. Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, & Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. Large Survey Reveals Limitations for Women Scientists

2. The Confidence Gap and Possible Effects on Persistence and Pay

3. The Richer You Are, the Older You'll Get

4. Career Profiles: Astronomer to Education and Public Outreach Officer

5. Shortchanging Girls Shortchanging America

6. Another Unhappy Equal Pay Day

7. Podcast on Getting Girls and Women Involved in STEM

8. KICP Education & Outreach Summer School for Graduate Students

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Large Survey Reveals Limitations for Women Scientists
From: Neil Gehrels via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

I just read a 2012 Physics Today article about statistics on women scientists that was understandable and compelling. It was great to see their numbers and be able to interpret them myself.

The PT article is called "Women in Physics:  A Tale of Limits" by Rachel Ivie and Casey Langer Tesfaye (Feb. 2012). In 2009 and 2010, the Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics did a large international survey to determine the status of women physicists worldwide. They surveyed 15,000 women and men physicists from 130 countries, asking questions to reveal where women may be limited in their careers.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/04/large-survey-reveals-limitations-for.html

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2. The Confidence Gap and Possible Effects on Persistence and Pay
From: Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[This article was also brought to our attention by Matthew A. Greenhouse of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. -Eds]

An article in The Atlantic by Kathy Kay and Claire Shipman is well worth reading and pondering.  On average, women are less confident than men, with harmful consequences for equitable advancement based on ability. "Confidence, " says psychologist Richard Pette, "is the stuff that turns thoughts into action."  A person with low confidence tends to try less hard, to give up more easily, to negotiate less successfully, and to face fewer challenges that lead to growth.  Could it be that men's overconfidence is putting women at a disadvantage?

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-confidence-gap-and-possible-effects.html

To read the Atlantic Monthly article, please visit

http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/04/the-confidence-gap/359815

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3. The Richer You Are, the Older You'll Get
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

According to the Brookings Institute, the richer you are, the longer you will live. The gap is especially widening among women. To see the stats and study results, please see

http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2014/04/18/the-richer-you-are-the-older-youll-get

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4. Career Profiles: Astronomer to Education and Public Outreach Officer
From: Laura Trouille via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy and the AAS Employment Committee have compiled dozens of interviews highlighting the diversity of career trajectories available to astronomers. The interviews share advice and lessons learned from individuals on those paths.

Below is our interview with an astronomer turned Education and Public Outreach Officer. If you have questions, suggestions, advice to share, etc. about this career path, please leave a comment below.

To read the interview, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/04/career-profiles-astronomer-to-education.html#more

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5. Shortchanging Girls Shortchanging America
From: Dorothy Fraquelli [fraquelli_at_stsci.edu]

The article "Study Finds Science Teachers Favor Males in Class," [AASWOMEN April 18, 2014] brought to mind the research AAUW published in 1991. The link below goes to the executive summary of that report.  It found teachers called on boys more often, encouraged boys to try again if the first answer was incorrect while almost never offering girls a second chance,  and praising a correct answer from a boy but almost never praising a correct answer from a girl.

To read the executive summary, please visit

http://www.aauw.org/resource/shortchanging-girls-shortchanging-america-executive-summary

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6. Another Unhappy Equal Pay Day
From: AWIS in Action! April 2014

Women make up half the workforce and are 40% of the primary breadwinners in this equal-pay-postercountry. However, women working full-time still only earn 77 cents on the dollar made by a man, a gap that has closed by only 18 cents over the past 50 years. Some of this is due to career choices, but even when all other differences are taken into consideration, some of the gap cannot be explained by anything but pay discrimination. Gender discrimination in pay is a smaller issue in STEM than it is for many other fields, but it is still an issue nonetheless.

To read more, please see

http://awisblog.wordpress.com/awis-in-action/april-2014/another-unhappy-equal-pay-day

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7. Podcast on Getting Girls and Women Involved in STEM
From: Jill Kurtz [jkurtz_at_apus.edu]

As a woman in this industry having a mentor is key. Young women looking into the sciences as a career path need guidance and a female role model they can self-identify with. In this podcast Dr. Francesca Catalano, Faculty Director for the Science, Space Studies and Environmental Science Programs at American Public University, talks about the importance of finding a mentor, why a terminal degree is relevant, career potential, and how women are trying to carve out their place in this industry.

To listen to the podcast, please visit

http://apus-stream.com/the-development-of-women-in-the-field-of-stem

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8. KICP Education & Outreach Summer School for Graduate Students
From: Laura Trouille [l-trouille_at_northwestern.edu]

We are very pleased to announce a hands-on summer school for graduate students interested in education and outreach (Eamp;O). This school will feature a week of practicum that will immerse participants in Eamp;O; for example, presenting at the Adler Planetarium amp; Astronomy Museum, developing hands-on classroom activities, creating content with WorldWide Telescope, or developing Zooniverse/citizen science program activities. The school will also include a one-day science communications workshop presented by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, field trips to Chicago area institutions, and a concise introduction to E&O basics.

     - Limited to 14 participants
     - Accommodations provided, free of charge.
     - Applications due May 13, 2014

To learn more, please see

http://kicp.uchicago.edu/EOsummer

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9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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10.  How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

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To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

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11. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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