Friday, September 13, 2013

AASWomen for September 13, 2013

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 13, 2013
eds: Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, & Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. Boys need outreach, too
2. Why So Few: High School Foundation I
3. Why the Woman Who ‘Has It All’ Doesn’t Really Exist
4. Pregnant in the lab: how does child-bearing affect a science career?
5. Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science
6. ‘Storming Wikipedia’ Project Tackles the Site’s ‘Women Problem’
7. The Trouble With Bright Girls
8. A Conversation with Theoretical Astrophysicist, Rachel Somerville
9. NRAO Community Event at DPS Meeting
10. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
12. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Boys need outreach, too
From: Hannah Jang-Condell at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
There was a time I thought that raising a daughter to be a confident, successful scientist would be the best way to help women in science. It's become more and more clear to me that it's just as important to raise sons who respect women, too.
Read more at
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/09/boys-need-outreach-too.html
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2. Why So Few: High School Foundation I
From: Joan Schmelz at womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
The 2010 report, entitled ‘Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics’, by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), describes how girls’ and women’s performance and participation in STEM fields have changed over time. Women have made tremendous progress in education and the workplace during the past 50 years, including progress in scientific and engineering fields.
To see data on course credits and course choices, please see
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/09/why-so-few-high-school-foundation-i.html
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3. Why the Woman Who ‘Has It All’ Doesn’t Really Exist
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
Debora Spar, author of Wonder Women and current president of Barnard College, sends a message to women: “Stop trying to be so good at everything”. In this Glamour article, Spar makes some interesting observations about how trying to have it all affects all aspects of women’s lives: from adolescence to marriage to motherhood. And it all starts when girls are young and learning about society’s beauty standards; she calculated that she will spend about five years of her life just putting on make-up and shaving her legs.
To read more, please see
http://www.glamour.com/inspired/2013/08/why-women-cant-have-it-all-according-to-barnard-college-president-debora-l-spar
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4. Pregnant in the lab: how does child-bearing affect a science career?
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
Jenny Rohn, a cell biologist at University College London, writes about her experiences in the lab – pregnant and trying to do science.
To read more, please see
http://www.theguardian.com/science/occams-corner/2013/aug/22/1
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5. Pioneering 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Education and Women in Science
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters and Journals is freely available and a good read, too! For example, Mitchell firmly believed that “the very faculties that suited women for needlework were also what primed them to be great scientists should they choose to pursue that.”
To read more, please see http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/08/22/maria-mitchell-education-women-in-science
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6. ‘Storming Wikipedia’ Project Tackles the Site’s ‘Women Problem’
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
Efforts continue to better represent at wikipedia.com the contributions of women in every field, from astronomy to zoology. To do this, more female editors are needed.
To learn more about this project, please see
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/26/wikipedia-women-storming-female-editors_n_3817138.html
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7. The Trouble With Bright Girls
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
Heidi Grant Halvorson reports on a study in which boys and girls in the 5th grade were evaluated on how well they could handle new, difficult, and confusing material. The study found that by the 5th grade, girls have given up trying to be smart – they reason that if they can’t figure out something that is foreign or complex, they will never learn it. The study further reported that girls retain these beliefs well into adulthood. The author claims, however, that skills are malleable and that persistence matters.
To read more about the results of this study, please see
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-science-success/201101/the-trouble-bright-girls
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8. A Conversation with Theoretical Astrophysicist, Rachel Somerville
From: WIPHYS, September 5, 2013
Astrophysicist Rachel Somerville recently received the AAS Dannie Heinemen prize for Astrophysics, just the third woman is history to be awarded this honor. She was recognized for her work in probing the complexities of galaxies in the Universe. In this interview, she offers her thoughts on why some areas of astrophysics are underrepresented by women.
To read more, please see
http://bit.ly/1cojBz1
or
http://www.underthemicroscope.com/a-conversation-with-theoretical-astrophysicist-rachel-somerville
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9. NRAO Community Event at DPS Meeting
From: Areille Moullet [amoullet_at_nrao.edu]
Monday October 7th, 12-1:30pm, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) invites you to a community designed for the planetary science community. In particular, it is for those who do not regularly utilize radio data in their research.
An overview of the NRAS facilities and their instruments will be given, followed by broader talks that describe the variety of observations possible.
For more information, please see
https://science.nrao.edu/php/nrao-cd-dps/index.php
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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter
To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org
All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.
When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.
Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.
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11. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter
Join AAS Women List by email:
Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.
Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)
To unsubscribe by email:
Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.
To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:
https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist
You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en
Google Groups Subscribe Help:
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12. Access to Past Issues
http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html
Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.
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