Friday, January 4, 2013

AASWomen for January 4, 2013

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of January 4, 2013
eds. Caroline Simpson, Michele Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, and Nick Murphy

This week's issues:

1. Sandy Faber awarded the National Medal of Science

2. AAS Special Session on Family Leave Policies and Childcare for Graduate Students and Postdocs

3. Astronomer to Data Scientist

4. Science is a girl thing

5. Revolutionizing Female Empowerment: Natalie Panek

6. Quality Family Time

7. The Professional Science Master’s Degree

8. Alan Alda's Flame Challenge: What is time?

9. APS Grants for Informing the Public: Deadline is January 11

10. Attention Undergrads: Publish or Review Articles with JURP

11. Funding Opportunities

12. Job Opportunities

13. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Sandy Faber awarded the National Medal of Science
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

[A UCSC press release on December 21, 2012 by Jim Burns describes Sandy Faber's award. Congratulations, Sandy! -Eds]

The White House announced today that a UC Santa Cruz faculty member is one of a dozen researchers selected by President Obama to receive the National Medal of Science. Sandra Faber, a University Professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UCSC and the interim director of UC Observatories, will receive the award from the president at a White House ceremony in early 2013.

To read more, please see

http://news.ucsc.edu/2012/12/national-science-medal.html

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2. AAS Special Session on Family Leave Policies and Childcare for Graduate Students and Postdocs
From: David Charbonneau [dcharbonneau_at_cfa.harvard.edu]

Monday, January 7, 2-3:30pm in Room 201B at the Long Beach Convention Center

This special session will provide a forum in which individuals in positions to influence policy (including university faculty and department chairs, and program directors from funding agencies) and those who may directly benefit from such policies (graduate students and postdocs) can discuss the current practices regarding parental leave and childcare for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, and the means by which departments and funding agencies can establish more supportive policies. The session will begin with the results from the recent national survey of graduate student parental leave policies in US departments of astronomy and astrophysics. We will then hear from a department chair and graduate student who together implemented a departmental paid leave policy. Additional speakers include program directors from NSF and NASA, as well as the AAS President David Helfand. Attend this session to learn about the recent changes in many university departments nationwide, and to ask questions that inform any policy changes you are considering in your own workplace.

This session is organized by David Charbonneau (Harvard), Laura Trouille (Northwestern), and the CSWA.

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3. Astronomer to Data Scientist
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

I recently made the transition from astrophysics researcher to data scientist for a tech company (Yammer / Microsoft). Below are suggestions for people in academia / research who are interested in pursuing a tech job.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/01/datascience.html

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4. Science is a girl thing
From: Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Any top ten list of affronts to women in science in 2012 would have to include the European Commission's tone deaf video effort purporting to encourage girls to enter science. The video that presented fashion models in a misguided marketing effort raised more than hackles and protest -- it stimulated a series of responses from women scientists and girls interested in science, which continue to stir the blogosphere. The cumulative impact of the marketing campaign gone awry reminds me of Neils Bohr's definition of a profound truth as one whose opposite is also a profound truth. An exclusionary presentation of women as fashion models pretending to be scientists has inspired a democratic outpouring of women scientists showing how much fun and accessible their work really is.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2012/12/science-is-girl-thing.html

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5. Revolutionizing Female Empowerment: Natalie Panek
From: Matthew Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

I suspect that your readership would enjoy this talk:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqmrANg5r6I&goback=%2Egde_3524234_member_199144594

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6. Quality Family Time
From: Jang-Condell via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Winter break is a wonderful time. If you're a younger grad student, it's a welcome respite from classes. If you're an older grad student or a postdoc, it's a welcome respite from hordes of undergrads. If you're pre-tenure faculty like myself, it's time to get back into all that work that you put off while teaching during the semester: doing research, writing papers, preparing for next semester's class, etc. My to-do list is a mile long. And above all, if you're an astronomer heading to the AAS Meeting next week, you're frantically doing last-minute calculations and polishing up your talk or poster.

The trouble is, my kids also have time off from school themselves.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2012/12/quality-family-time.html

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7. The Professional Science Master’s Degree
From: AAAS MemberCentral Newsletter for Dec 28, 2012

[This is an interesting post about representation in Professional Science Master's programs by Daryl E. Chubin, AAAS Senior Advisor. -Eds.]

From all indications, based mainly on Council of Graduate Schools survey data--on applications, enrollments, and degrees earned Professional Science Master (PSM) Degrees are thriving. But I see several challenges that the advocates and leaders of PSM programs must recognize and confront.

From its inception, my hope for PSM was that it would not replicate the race and gender biases of doctoral science education. Indeed, my vision touted the appeal of the degree and the doors it opens through the foresight of its employer-laden advisory committees and faculty who cherish what they do for their students today--instead of their personal legacies tomorrow. Alas, this is not quite the case.

To read more, please see

http://membercentral.aaas.org/blogs/stemedu/professional-science-master-s-degree-2nd-generation-outcomes-and-challenges-pt-2

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8. Alan Alda's Flame Challenge: What is time?
From: AAAS MemberCentral Newsletter for Dec 28, 2012

Actor Alan Alda is challenging scientists once again to answer a basic science question in language that will engage and enlighten 11-year-olds. He and the Stony Brook University Center for Communicating Science have launched the second edition of the Flame Challenge, sponsored by AAAS and the American Chemical Society.

The question for this year’s contest, selected from 300 submissions by children, is: “What is time?” Scientists have until 1 March 2013 to submit their answers in writing, video, or graphics.

To read more, please see

http://www.aaas.org/news/releases/2012/1212flame_challenge.shtml

and

http://www.centerforcommunicatingscience.org/the-flame-challenge-2

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9. APS Grants for Informing the Public: Deadline is January 11
From: WIPHYS Posting for Dec 27, 2012

APS annually awards several grants up to $10,000 to help APS members develop new physics outreach activities. Programs can be for traditional K-12 audiences or projects for engaging the public. Innovative ideas and new approaches are particularly encouraged. The grant process is open now and new grant awards are announced in late spring.

To learn more, please see

http://www.aps.org/programs/outreach/grants/index.cfm

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10. Attention Undergrads: Publish or Review Articles with JURP
From: WIPHYS Posting for Dec 27, 2012

The Journal of Undergraduate Research in Physics (JURP) is a peer-reviewed, online journal published by the Society of Physics Students and Sigma Pi Sigma, the physics honor society. JURP is devoted to publishing research conducted by undergraduate students in physics and its related fields. JURP provides resources for all stages in the research/publication process: links to find research opportunities, tips on writing an article, tips on presenting (posters or oral), and a calendar of national meetings. JURP also provides undergraduates with the full experience of publishing articles; we are always looking for reviewers as well as authors. If you're interested in publishing, reviewing, or have any JURP-related questions, contact JURP's Assistant Editor Elizabeth Hook [ehook_at_aip.org].

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11. Funding Opportunities
From: AWIS Washington Wire December 2012 - Issue II

* Opportunity for Scientists to Collaborate with European Colleagues http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=124845&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click

* ADVANCE Program Solicitation http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12584/nsf12584.htm

* Small Business Postdoctoral Research Diversity Fellowship http://nsfsbir.asee.org

* NSF's Career-Life Balance (CLB) Initiative http://www.nsf.gov/career-life-balance/suppfunds.jsp

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12. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

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13. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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15. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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