Tuesday, July 13, 2010

AASWOMEN for July 9, 2010

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 9, 2010
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson amp; Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1. Men In Academic Science Earn Up To 40% More Than Women

2. Book Review: Whistling Vivaldi And Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us

3. The Effects of Textbook Images on Science Performance

*** FOLLOWING JOB POSTINGS TAKEN FROM WIPHYS ***

4. NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program

5. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

6. APS Career Center

7. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

8. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN


1. Men In Academic Science Earn Up To 40% More Than Women
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

From the HuffingtonPost.com at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/25/men-in-academic-science-e_n_625287.html "In a survey of academic scientists in 16 countries, Nature found that men earn, on average, 18 to 40 percent more than their female counterparts.

The study suggested that the salary gap only gets worse in the duration of men and women's careers. Nature reports 'In Europe, men's salaries start to increase noticeably in relation to women's in the 3-5-year range, and in the 6-10-year range in North America.'

The study also discovered that the salaries of women with tertiary degrees were about 50 to 60 percent of their male counterparts."

For the full report, see the original Nature article on job satisfaction and what drives it at http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/2010/100624/full/nj7301-1104a.html

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2. Book Review: Whistling Vivaldi And Other Clues to How Stereotypes
Affect Us
From: Wal Sargent [wws_at_astro.caltech.edu]

[Based on the book review by Richard J. Crisp in the July 1, 2010 Times Higher Education Supplement, Wal Sargent thought this book might be of interest. -- eds.]

Whistling Vivaldi And Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us by Claude M. Steele

"I have a memory of the first time I realized I was black." This opening line of Whistling Vivaldi seems at first glance quite simple, but as you read on it comes to represent a fundamental truth about the relationship between the individual and society.

The truth is the psychological reality that our hopes, dreams and aspirations are tied inextricably to our place in a social hierarchy and that our identities within this social hierarchy define the journey our lives will take. At least, this is the case unless we can understand and harness the psychological power of stereotypes and social identity.

Claude Steele's book is all about stereotypes - the beliefs people hold about different social groups - and how these beliefs affect our attitudes and abilities. It describes how the author came across a brand-new psychological phenomenon that he named "stereotype threat", and how this phenomenon fundamentally changed the way psychologists thought about how stereotypes shape our lives.

See the full book review at http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=412260

[For more on stereotype threat, and a description of Steele's work, see the "Why So Few" report by the AAUW, at http://www.aauw.org/learn/research/upload/whysofew.pdf -- eds.]

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3. The Effects of Textbook Images on Science Performance
From: WIPHYS, July 9, 2010

BBC Radio's "All in the Mind" program featured a short interview with Rutgers University's Jessica Good on her research involving the effects of textbook images on science performance. Listen to the interview at http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00sxgs6 (16:20-20:30). The results of Ms. Good's research indicate that female students had higher comprehension of science lessons after viewing counter-stereotypic images (female scientists) than after viewing stereotypic images (male scientists).

For more information, the article on this research can be found in The Journal of Social Psychology, Volume 150, Number 2, March-April 2010, Pages 132-147 (Authors: J.J. Good, J.A. Woodzicka, and L.C. Wingfield).

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4. NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program
From: WIPHYS, July 9, 2010

Deadline is July 20, 2010 The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.

Go to: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503214&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39 for detailed program information.

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5. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
From: WIPHYS, July 9, 2010

This program offers one to three year postdoctoral fellowships designed to increase the involvement of scientists and engineers from academia and industry to scientific and technical areas of interest and relevance to the Navy. This program has a rolling admission.

Go to http://www.asee.org/resources/nrl for detailed program information.

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6. APS Career Center
From: WIPHYS, July 9, 2010

In addition to the AAS Job Register ( http://members.aas.org/JobReg/JobRegister.cfm ) don't forget to check out the APS CAREER CENTER at http://careers.aps.org

Physics, Science, Engineering Jobs Free to All Job Seekers

Post your job or resume and reach over 125,000 specialized researchers and experienced top-level managers in physics, engineering, optics, lasers, computer science, materials, and other science related fields worldwide.

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7. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

[Please remember to replace "_at_" in the below e-mail addresses.]

To submit to AASWOMEN: send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material sent to that address will be posted unless you tell us otherwise (including your email address).

To subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN go to

http://lists.aas.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/aaswlist

and fill out the form.

If you experience any problems, please email itdept_at_aas.org

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8. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN

Past issues of AASWOMEN are available at

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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