Friday, December 4, 2009

AASWomen of December 4, 2009

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of December 4, 2009
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson & Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1. All of Us Must Work for Diversity

2. Follow Up: What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?

3. In-/Appropriate Behavior Between Students and Advisors

4. Tips from the Top of the Career Ladder

5. Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics

6. APS Professional Skills Development Workshop, March 14

7. APS Childcare Grants Available

8. APS Minotiry Scholarships

9. Jefferson Science Fellowship

10. APS Congressional Science Fellowship 2010-2011

11. Four extragalactic postdoc positions at Swinburne University

12. Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University

13. Assistant or Associate Professor Position, NMSU

14. Four Tenure-Track Positions, Arizona State University

*** FOLLOWING JOB POSTINGS TAKEN FROM WIPHYS ***

15. Physics Lecturer Position, Wake Forest University

16. Physics Lab Instructor Position, Vassar College

17. Non-Tenure Track, Open Rank Position, George Washington University

18. Assistant Professor of Physics, Randolph College

19. Tenure Track Faculty Position in Physics, Rhodes College

20. How to Submit, Subscribe, or Unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

21. Access to Past Issues of AASWOMEN


1. All of Us Must Work for Diversity
From: Marc Postman [postman_at_stsci.edu]

[Please also see #3 on Student/Advisor Relationships and #4 on Survival in the Workplace, contributing articles to this theme.]

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2009/12/all-of-us-must-work-for-diversity-by.html

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2. Follow Up: What Can You Negotiate in Your Job Offer?
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

[We continue to summarize the major outcomes from the Women in Astronomy III conference held at the University of Maryland October 21-23, 2009 - Eds.]

Two posts were mistakenly omitted in our original list, one by Katy Flint from the National Postdoctoral Association and one in informal astronomy education that only wished to provide their first name. To read more on what postdocs and informal astronomy educators should consider in negotiating job offers, please see the Women in Astronomy blog at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2009/11/what-can-you-negotiate-in-your-job.html

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3. In-/Appropriate Behavior Between Students and Advisors
From: Adam Burgasser [aburgasser_at_ucsd.edu]

[We continue to summarize the major outcomes from the Women in Astronomy III conference held at the University of Maryland October 21-23, 2009 - Eds. The following is a summary by Michele M. Montgomery of one of the posters presented at this meeting. Please see #1 on Diversity and #4 on Survival in the Workplace, contributing articles to this theme.]

Adam Burgasser (UCSD/MIT) and Jacqueline Faherty (AMNH/SUNY Stony Brook) conducted a survey on "Perceptions of Appropriate Behavior Between Students and Advisors in Astronomy" and presented their results at the Women in Astronomy Conference that was held at the Universtiy of Maryland October 21-23, 2009. They studied various behavior scenarios between students and advisors including weight gain or loss; staying late for work; birthday or holiday gifts; hanging out; late-night at-home phone calls, among others.

Results of the survey include the following: Perceptions of behavior appropriateness vary with age and professional status, with younger astronomers and those at earlier stages in their career typically viewing behaviors as more appropriate. Perceptions of student/advisor behavior scenarios vary with the gender pairing, with behaviors from student/advisor pairs of different gender being viewed as more inappropiate.

One fact found from this survey is that female students are less likely to have a same gender advisor than male students, and this lack of diversity in gender pairings may negatively impact the female's student/advisor relationship. Another interesting find is that this survey attracted a small fraction of highly negative and fearful criticism from men, lending another conclusion that resistence to open discussion of appropriate behaviors between students and advisors continues today. For the full survey scope, limitations, biases, results, and conclusions, please see

http://web.mit.edu/~ajb/www/browndwarfs//wia2009/ .

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4. Tips from the Top of the Career Ladder
From: Amy Simon-Miller and John Pearl
[amy.a.simon-miller_at_nasa.gov and john.c.pearl_at_nasa.gov]

[The following is a contribution from Amy Simon-Miller and John Pearl, summarized by Michele M. Montgomery. Please see also #1 on Diversity and #3 on advisor/student behaviors, contributing articles to this theme.]

In the Opinion section of Nature (Vol. 462/12 November 2009), the book "Beyond the Boys Club: Strategies for Achieving Career Success as a Woman Working in a Male-dominated Field" is reviewed. The author, Suzanne Doyle-Morris, interviews 21 senior women from a wide range of backgrounds to discover their survival skills in the male-dominated workplace. The senior women vary in age and fields: One is a senior diplomat, another is a retired archaelogist, and a third is a professor at the University of Cambridge. Doyle-Morris argues that women face difficulties in the work place mostly due to old career structures. She also finds that career advancement is not entirely based on merit and is more based on marketing, relationships, and a good profile. The rise to the top is slow in science and engineering. In the United Kingdom, about 70% of women holding degrees in science, engineering, and technology do not work in the field. Advice from professors who have stayed in the field suggest mentoring, flexible working time in laboratories, specializing in a field other than your PhD topic during postdoc years, and finding cross-disciplinary collaborations. The book also offers suggestions on developing relationships, raising your profile, building your image, networking, risk taking, negotiating politics, and choosing a mentor.

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5. Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics
From: WIPHYS, November 30

Four conferences for undergraduate women in physics (CUWPs) will be held simultaneously in four locations around the United States, January 15 17, 2010. Travel funding is available (see websites for details).

1) Midwest CUWP: The Ohio State University http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/undergrad/WiP_Conference/

2) Northeast CUWP: Yale University http://www.yale.edu/spsyale/cuwpy/

3) Southeast CUWP: Duke University/North Carolina State University/North Carolina Central University/University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill http://southeastcuwp.org

4) West Coast CUWP: University of California at Santa Cruz http://dave.ucsc.edu/wipconf

The CUWP goals are to help young women continue in physics by providing them with the opportunity to experience a professional conference, information about graduate school and professions in physics, and access to other women in physics of all ages with whom they can share experiences, advice, and ideas. Our programs include research talks by faculty, panel discussions about graduate school and careers in physics, presentations and discussions about women in physics, laboratory tours, student research talks, a student poster session, and several meals during which presenters and students interact with each other.

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6. APS Professional Skills Development Workshop, March 14
From: WIPHYS, December 2

The American Physical Society offer a Professional Skills Development Workshops for Women Physicists on Sunday, March 14 in Portland, Oregon in association with the APS Annual Meeting there. The workshop will be aimed at women post docs and tenure-track women faculty

The deadline to apply is December 7, 2009. First consideration will go to applications received by that date, and the workshop will be limited in size for optimal benefits. All participants are eligible to receive a stipend to help cover the cost of travel and up to two nights lodging.

Women of color are especially encouraged to apply.

The workshop is aimed towards enhancing the status of women in physics, by providing professional training on effective negotiation, communication and leadership skills for female physicists in a position to become the future leaders. In addition, the workshop will offer a special opportunity for networking at a reception to follow.

Information is now posted at

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/workshops/skills/index.cfm .

This program is supported by an award from the National Science Foundation. Questions? Please contact Sue Otwell at APS otwell_at_aps.org.

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7. APS Childcare Grants Available

Small grants of up to $400 are available to assist meeting attendees at the APS annual meetings who are bringing small children or who incur extra expenses in leaving them at home.

Applications for the grants must be received by December 15, 2009 (for the February/April meeting in Washington, DC) and by January 15, 2010 (for the March meeting in Portland, Oregon) to be considered by a subcommittee of the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP). In the event that the number of requests for grants exceeds the funding available, preference will be given to applicants in the early stages of their careers.

Information is posted on the Meetings website at

http://www.aps.org/meetings/april/services/childcare.cfm

(for the February/April meeting) and at

http://www.aps.org/meetings/march/services/childcare.cfm

(for the March meeting).

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8. APS Minotiry Scholarships
From: WIPHYS, December 3

Do you know a minority high school senior, college freshman or sophomore who is interested in majoring in physics and could benefit from a scholarship with built-in mentoring?

The American Physical Society is once again pleased to offer the APS Scholarship Program for Minority Undergraduate Physics Majors. This excellent, highly competitive scholarship program not only provides funding to students, but also a great deal of student support. We encourage all eligible students to apply right away using our new online application.

Eligibility includes: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, or Native Americans • High school seniors, college freshmen or sophomores • US citizens or permanent legal residents • Physics majors and those planning to major in physics

Award: $2,000 for new students, and $3,000 for renewal students A local physics mentor An APS physics mentor

To Apply: Check out the easy-to-use online application:

http://aps.org/programs/minorities/honors/scholarship/

Deadline: February 5, 2010

The online application form must be completed and all supporting documents must be postmarked by the deadline date

Questions? Email minorityscholarship_at_aps.org

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9. Jefferson Science Fellowship
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

Tenured academic scientists and engineers from U.S. institutions of higher education, that are U.S. citizens, and that can maintain security clearances are eligibile to become Jeffereson Science Fellows. These fellows spend one year in Washington D.C. at the U.S. Department of State or the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) or at U.S. foreign embassays and/or missions. Fellows provide up-to-date expertise in science, technology, or engineering that routinely impact the policy decisions encountered by the U.S. Department of State/USAID. To read more about the requirements, tasks, and eligibility requirements, please see

http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Jefferson/ .

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10. APS Congressional Science Fellowship 2010-2011
From: WIPHYS, November 23

The American Physical Society is currently accepting applications for the Congressional Science Fellowship Program. Fellows serve one year on the staff of a senator, representative or congressional committee. They are afforded an opportunity to learn the legislative process and explore science policy issues from the lawmakers' perspective. In turn, Fellows have the opportunity to lend scientific and technical expertise to public policy issues.

Qualifications include a PhD or equivalent in physics or a closely related field, a strong interest in science and technology policy and, ideally, some experience in applying scientific knowledge toward the solution of societal problems. Fellows are required to be U.S. citizens and members of the APS.

Term of Appointment is one year, beginning in September of 2010 with participation in a two week orientation sponsored by AAAS. Fellows have considerable choice in congressional assignments.

A stipend is offered in addition to allowances for relocation, in-service travel, and health insurance premiums.

Application should consist of a letter of intent of no more than 2-pages, a 2-page resume: with one additional page for publications, and three letters of reference. Please see the APS website

http://www.aps.org/policy/fellowships/congressional.cfm

for detailed information on materials required for applying and other information on the program.

All application materials must be submitted online by January 15, 2010.

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11. Four extragalactic postdoc positions at Swinburne University
From: Sarah Maddison [smaddison_at_swin.edu.au]

We have available four postdoctoral research positions in extragalactic astronomy in the Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. The application deadline for all is 15 January 2010. The four positions are:

- High-Redshift Galaxy Evolution (observational) with Prof. Karl Glazebrook http://members.aas.org/JobReg/JobDetailPage.cfm?JobID=26149

- Galaxy Evolution/Large-scale Structure/Cosmology (theoretical/numerical) with Dr. Darren Croton http://members.aas.org/JobReg/JobDetailPage.cfm?JobID=26162

- Extragalactic Astrophysics and the IGM (observational) with Dr. Emma Ryan-Webber http://members.aas.org/JobReg/JobDetailPage.cfm?JobID=26161

- Large-scale Structure and Dark Energy (observational/survey analysis) with the WiggleZ Team http://members.aas.org/JobReg/JobDetailPage.cfm?JobID=26160

The Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing

http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/

is one of the most vibrant astronomy institutes in Australia, comprising more than 45 researchers (15 of whom are permanent research-active staff members), providing an outstanding research and mentoring environment for incoming postdocs. We provide access to state-of-the-art High Performance Computing (1160 core 'green machine' in-house) and large optical telescope facilities (up to 10m). We have the largest extragalactic group in Australia, including three QEII Fellows, two ARC International Fellows and one Australian Professorial Fellow.

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12. Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University
From: WIPHYS, November 24

The Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University invites applications for residential fellowships for the academic year 2010-2011 from tenured and tenure-track faculty (or the equivalent), and postdoctoral scholars, from the U.S. and international universities.

Applications for one, two or three quarters will be considered. Fellows must remain on faculty and be in residence at the Clayman Institute for the duration of their fellowship. Fellowships will be non-stipendiary in 2010-2011, except for the postdoctoral appointment where stipend and benefits will be set and adjusted in accordance with Stanford University rules.

Fellows are provided with faculty-equivalent privileges for using Stanford's library and other facilities, an office at the Institute, and the collegiality of a diverse community of gender scholars from across the spectrum of academic disciplines and ranks.

Thematic Focus: "Reinvigorating the Revolution: Advancing Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century"

Projects are supported in all disciplines including the humanities, social sciences, science and engineering, business, law, and medicine, among others, so long as they focus centrally on gender. Possible sub-topics include (but are not limited to): -The gender division of household labor -Families and women's careers: the 2nd shift, opting out, on-ramping, and flexible schedules -Representations of women in culture and history -Gender stereotyping and bias in the workplace -Gendered meanings and practices at work and home -Women's experiences in male-dominated fields, such as science and engineering -Gendered innovations in knowledge: Bringing gender analysis into the practice of science -Gender and culture in history or literature -Advancing women's progress in the professions of business, medicine, and law -Historical and cross-national comparisons of women's educational and occupational progress -Effects of legal mandates (such a Title IX and FMLA) on women's careers -National policies, organizational polices, and work-family balance: what works? -Men's involvement in gender equality movements -Gender, leadership, and entrepreneurship

How to Apply: Applications are to be received in our office by 5:00pm (PST) on Tuesday, December 15, 2009. Instructions and detailed information are available at

http://gender.stanford.edu

under Fellowships.

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13. Assistant or Associate Professor Position, NMSU
From: Ofelia Ruiz [oruiz_at_nmsu.edu]

The New Mexico State University (NMSU) Department of Astronomy invites applications for a 9-month, tenure-track faculty position in Solar/Stellar astrophysics beginning August 2010. We expect that this appointment will be filled at the level of Assistant Professor, but appointment at the Associate Professor level may be possible in exceptional cases.

Qualifications: Applicants must have a Ph.D. in astronomy, astrophysics, physics, or a closely related field. Candidates with a demonstrable research record in fields associated with work done at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) are encouraged to apply. Example fields include solar/stellar structure and dynamics, solar activity, space weather, spectropolarimetry, MHD, and the solar-stellar connection. See the NSO Long Range Plan FY2009-2013 available on the NSO web site for further details. Of particular interest are candidates with expertise in solar or stellar pulsations and also high-resolution solar observations and their interpretation. The successful candidate will ideally provide evidence of their ability to deliver high quality instruction at the graduate and undergraduate levels, a sustained external research funding record, and experience as an advisor to MS and PhD students.

The Department is involved in a wide range of astronomical research. We also benefit from membership in the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) and its Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5-meter telescope. The Department operates its own 1-meter telescope at APO, is a member of the Sloan III project, and is a user of numerous ground based observatories and NASA scientific satellites. Additional Department information can be found at

http://astronomy.nmsu.edu .

NMSU serves a diverse undergraduate and graduate population of 18,500 students. Located in Las Cruces (the state's second largest city), NMSU is within driving distance of: the Apache Point Observatory, the National Solar Observatory, the NRAO Very Large Array, the McDonald Observatory, and Kitt Peak National Observatory.

To be considered for this position, send a cover letter, a brief statement of research interests and plans (including a discussion of anticipated research directions over the next five years), a brief description of teaching experience and philosophy, unofficial transcripts of PhD and a curriculum vitae to:

Dr. Bernard McNamara Chair, Faculty Search Committee Department of Astronomy New Mexico State University, MSC 4500 1320 Frenger St. Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

Applicants should arrange for three confidential letters of recommendation to be sent to the above address. Review of completed applications will begin January 1, 2010 and will continue until the position is filled or closed. Questions can be addressed to: astfaculty_at_nmsu.edu or (575) 646-4438.

New Mexico State University is an EEO/AA Employer. Offer of employment contingent upon verification of individual's eligibility for employment in the United States. All offers of employment, oral and written are contingent on the university's verification of credentials and other information required by federal law, state law, and NMSU policies/procedures, and will include the completion of a criminal history check.

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14. Four Tenure-Track Positions, Arizona State University
From: James Rhoads [James.Rhoads_at_asu.edu]

We are seeking to hire faculty in the areas of

- Extrasolar planet studies - Observational cosmology - Instrumentation development - Planetary atmospheres

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Extrasolar Planet Studies at the School of Earth and
Space Exploration, Arizona State University:

We welcome candidates who wish to engage in collaborative, multidisciplinary research on the nature, formation, and evolution of extrasolar planets. Both observational and theoretical studies are of interest. Specific research areas might include but are not limited to: spectroscopy of planets and their host stars, novel techniques used to search for and characterize exoplanets, planetary interior models, and planetary dynamics. A demonstrated track record in research, teaching and grantsmanship is preferred.

Applications should include: 1) a cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests, 2) a current CV, and 3) the names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references.

Inquiries and applications must be addressed to Kip Hodges, Director, School of Earth and Space Exploration, and submitted electronically to sesenewfac_at_asu.edu. Submissions in pdf format are preferred.

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Observational Cosmology

The ASU Cosmology Initiative, a joint venture of ASU's School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Department of Physics, seeks to hire a junior faculty member in observational cosmology.

The ideal candidate would be an observer engaged in exciting forefront research targeting at least one of the following areas: The cosmic dark ages, First Light and reionization, galaxy assembly and evolution, AGN and supermassive black holes, or large scale structure. The position will build on the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope, be able to use the refurbished Hubble, and in the future the James Webb Space Telescope and other facilities.

The successful candidate would join the faculty in the School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE). They will have the opportunity to interact with colleagues working on a wide range of topics including galaxy formation, galaxy evolution, and reionization; dark matter and dark energy; particle astrophysics and the physics of the early universe; stellar physics and cosmic explosions; star-formation and stellar evolution; the formation and evolution of planetary systems; astronomical instrumentation; astrobiology; planetary geology; and geophysics and geology.

Faculty at ASU can apply for time on Arizona Observatory facilities, including the 6.5m MMT at Mt Hopkins, the two 6.5m Magellan telescopes in Chile, the 2.3m Bok and 1.8m VATT telescopes, the 2x8.4m LBT at Mt Graham, and the 10m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope, with access to the 22m Giant Magellan Telescope anticipated upon its completion. In addition, they have access to on-site facilities including laboratories and clean rooms.

ASU offers a stimulating intellectual environment, along with competitive salary, benefits, and startup packages.

Candidates should have a PhD in astronomy, astrophysics, or physics, or an equivalent qualification. They should also have a strong record of publications in the peer-reviewed literature. A demonstrated record of obtaining research funding will be a plus.

A background check is required for employment. Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Applicants should submit a letter of interest, a full curriculum vitae, a research and teaching statement, and contact information for 3 references. Letters of recommendation (PDF or Word preferred) should be emailed separately to cosmology_at_asu.edu. Please reference the applicant's name in the subject line of the email.

Applications can be submitted online at

http://sese.asu.edu/node/add/applicant-faculty

Deadline: December 15, 2009

Please direct questions to cosmology_at_asu.edu .

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Instrumentation Development

The ASU Cosmology Initiative, a joint venture of ASU's School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Department of Physics, seeks to hire either a senior or junior faculty member working in instrumentation development for cosmology or a closely related branch of astrophysics. These instrumentation efforts can be space based, suborbital, balloon or aircraft, and/or include building ground-based instruments. The university is prepared to make substantial investments in the infrastructure necessary to support this position.

The successful candidate would join the faculty in the School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE). They will have the opportunity to interact with colleagues working on a wide range of topics including galaxy formation, galaxy evolution, and reionization; dark matter and dark energy; particle astrophysics and the physics of the early universe; stellar physics and cosmic explosions; star formation and stellar evolution in cosmological contexts; the formation and evolution of planetary systems; astronomical instrumentation; astrobiology; planetary geology; and geophysics and geology.

Faculty at ASU can apply for time on Arizona Observatory facilities, including the 6.5m MMT at Mt Hopkins, the two 6.5m Magellan telescopes in Chile, the 2.3m Bok and 1.8m VATT telescopes, the 2x8.4m LBT at Mt Graham, and the 10m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope, with access to the 22m Giant Magellan Telescope anticipated upon its completion. In addition, they have access to onsite facilities including laboratories and clean rooms.

ASU offers a stimulating intellectual environment, along with competitive salary, benefits, and startup packages.

Candidates should have a PhD in astronomy, astrophysics, or physics, or an equivalent qualification. They should also have a strong record of publications in the peer-reviewed literature. A demonstrated record of obtaining development funding will be vital.

A background check is required for employment. Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Applicants should submit a letter of interest, a full curriculum vitae, a research and teaching statement, and contact information for 3 references. Letters of recommendation (PDF or Word preferred) should be emailed separately to cosmology_at_asu.edu. Please reference the applicant's name in the subject line of the email.

Applications can be submitted online at

http://sese.asu.edu/node/add/applicant-faculty

Deadline: December 15, 2009

Please direct questions to cosmology_at_asu.edu.

ASU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer that actively seeks diversity among applicants and promotes a diverse workforce.

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Planetary Atmospheres at the School of Earth and Space Exploration,
Arizona State University:

We welcome applications from those who wish to engage in collaborative, multidisciplinary studies of planetary atmospheres. A demonstrated track record in research, teaching and grantsmanship is preferred. Atmospheres of all planetary bodies are of interest, including those of Mars, Titan, gas giants, and hot Jupiter-like planets in extrasolar systems. Areas of interest include: atmospheric dynamics at global, regional, or mesoscales, atmospheric state, composition, origin and evolution, and surface-atmosphere interactions. These studies could be focused on numerical modeling, observations, data analysis, instrument design and development, or some combination of these approaches. Successful applicants will be expected to interact with the current and future SESE directions, including planetary surface processes and dynamics, astrobiology, climatology, and/or the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems.

Applications should include: 1) a cover letter that includes a description of the applicant?s research and teaching interests, 2) a current CV, and 3) the names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references. Inquiries and applications must be addressed to Kip Hodges, Director, School of Earth and Space Exploration, and submitted electronically to sesenewfac_at_asu.edu. Submissions in pdf format are preferred.

Full job ads are available in context at

http://sese.asu.edu/opportunities .

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15. Physics Lecturer Position, Wake Forest University
From: WIPHYS, November 23

Wake Forest University invites applications for a lecturer position in physics at the junior or senior level to begin in the fall semester of 2010. Applicants should have completed a Ph.D. in physics and have experience teaching introductory physics. The initial appointment will be for two years, with future appointments renewable at the end of each appointment term.

The successful candidate will be responsible for teaching lower level physics courses and laboratories for science and non science majors. Responsibilities will also include undergraduate advising and developing and teaching a first year seminar course. Interests in one or more of the following would strengthen a candidate’s application: an interest in teaching introductory astronomy, familiarity with new teaching methods and technologies, and interest in grant writing for educational purposes.

Wake Forest University is a highly ranked, private university with about 4500 undergraduates, 750 graduate students, and 1700 students in the professional schools of medicine, law, divinity and business.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, a CV including details of all teaching experience, a one page statement of their teaching philosophy, and the names of three references to the Physics Lecturer Search Committee, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 7507, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC 27109 7507. Application materials can also be sent electronically in the form of a single PDF document to wfuphysrecruit_at_lists.wfu.edu. Review of applications will begin January 5, 2010 and will continue until the position is filled. Further information is available at

http://www.wfu.edu/physics .

Wake Forest University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

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16. Physics Lab Instructor Position, Vassar College
From: Debra Elegreen [elmegreen_at_vassar.edu]

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Vassar College invites applications for a one-year position as lab instructor in physics at the lecturer level beginning in September 2010, with the possibility of a longer-term position pending budgetary approval.

Vassar College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and is strongly and actively committed to diversity within its community. Applications from members of historically underrepresented groups are especially encouraged.

Applicants should have a minimum of a master?s degree in physics. Preference will be given to those with teaching and/or laboratory experience. The successful candidate is expected to teach the introductory physics labs (four each semester) as well as an additional physics course to be determined. The department currently consists of four physicists and two astronomers; their research specialties are detailed on the department homepage

http://physicsandastronomy.vassar.edu .

Candidates should submit (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a statement of teaching interest and laboratory experience, and (3) arrange for three letters of recommendation. To apply, please visit

https://employment.vassar.edu/ .

Applications received by February 15 will be given full consideration; applications received after that date will be considered until the position is filled. Salaries are competitive. Vassar College is a liberal arts college with an enrollment of 2450 students. The 1000-acre campus is located in Poughkeepsie, 75 miles north of New York City along the Hudson River.

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17. Non-Tenure Track, Open Rank Position, George Washington University
From: WIPHYS, December 2, 2009

The George Washington University Honors Program is seeking to fill an open rank, non tenure-accruing appointment for a three-year contractual period, beginning Fall 2010. The position may be renewed subject to performance. The desirable field of specialization is science education with particular expertise in physics education research.

Basic Qualifications: Applicants must have completed the Ph.D. in Physics by 1 August 2010, have excellent teaching skills as demonstrated by teaching assessments and references, and have a desire to teach at the undergraduate level.

Preferred Qualifications: Experience in the applicability of physics education research to science education more generally is highly desirable as in interest in interdisciplinary science education. The successful candidate will teach six courses per year for the University Honors Program and may expect to play a leadership role in developing and assessing the science curriculum.

Application Procedure: only complete applications will be considered. To be considered, send letter of application, cv, three letters of reference, a brief statement of teaching objectives and methods, along with summaries of teaching evaluations and/or classroom observations, samples of scholarly publications, and official academic transcripts to:

University Honors Program Science Education Search 714 21st Street, NW George Washington University Washington, DC 20052

Review of applications will begin after 30 December 2009 and will continue until the position is filled.

The George Washington University seeks to attract an active, culturally and academically diverse faculty of the highest caliber. The George Washington University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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18. Assistant Professor of Physics, Randolph College
From: WIPHYS November 23, 2009

Tenure-track position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, beginning July 1, 2010. A Ph.D. in Physics or closely-related discipline is required. Teaching experience in basic engineering courses and/or astronomy is desired.

We seek a natural scientist whose first priority is high-quality teaching, including research with students, in a competitive liberal arts college. The successful candidate will demonstrate ability and interest in teaching and scholarship, enthusiasm for community involvement, and will help to develop and strengthen the physics programs. Responsibilities include teaching introductory and upper-level physics, possibly teaching basic engineering courses or astronomy, developing and modernizing laboratories at all levels, and scholarship that encourages undergraduate research.

Modest start-up funds are available, and pursuit of external funding for research is encouraged. Review of applications will begin December 15 and continue until the position is filled.

Send curriculum vitae, cover letter, transcripts, and statement of teaching philosophy to Dr. Peter Sheldon, Physics Department, Randolph College, 2500 Rivermont Avenue, Lynchburg, VA, 24503 or to psheldon_at_randolphcollege.edu. EOE

[For more information, please see

http://web.randolphcollege.edu/humanresources/employment_opps.asp#314 ]

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19. Tenure Track Faculty Position in Physics, Rhodes College
From: WIPHYS, November 24

The Department of Physics invites applications for a tenure-track position at the level of Assistant Professor beginning fall 2010. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in physics or astronomy, and candidates with either theoretical or experimental research interests are welcome to apply. The successful applicant must demonstrate an enthusiasm for teaching, the ability to teach at all levels of a rigorous undergraduate physics curriculum, and the potential to carry out a productive research program involving undergraduate students. Individuals who can support our curriculum in the area of astronomy/astrophysics and who have interests that go beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries are encouraged to apply. The Department of Physics has significant resources for faculty and student research; see www.rhodes.edu/physics for information about the department.

All application materials are to be submitted electronically. Applicants should combine their CV, transcripts (undergraduate and graduate), a statement of teaching philosophy, and a description of research plans (stating explicitly how undergraduate students will be involved) into one pdf document less than 7 MB in size and email it to PhysicsSearch_at_rhodes.edu. Candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation (at least one should speak to the candidate’s teaching abilities) sent to PhysicsSearch_at_rhodes.edu. For information about the position, please contact Dr. Ann Viano, chair of the Search Committee, at viano_at_rhodes.edu . Review of completed applications will begin on January 4, 2010.

Founded in 1848, Rhodes College is a highly selective, private, residential, undergraduate college, located in Memphis, Tennessee. We aspire to graduate students with a lifelong passion for learning, a compassion for others, and the ability to translate academic study and personal concern into effective leadership and action in their communities and the world. We encourage applications from candidates interested in helping us achieve this vision. We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workforce.

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