Friday, June 26, 2020

AASWomen Newsletter for June 26, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 26, 2020
eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson,
Alessandra Aloisi, and Jeremy Bailin

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. Be well! --eds.]

This week's issues:


1. Nominate our field’s best for the 2021 AAS Prizes and Honors by June 30

2. NASA Names Headquarters After ‘Hidden Figure’ Mary W. Jackson

3. A Celebration of E. Margaret Burbidge

4. Astrobites #BlackInAstroWeek posts

5. Researchers Address the ‘Leaky Pipeline’ to Academic Science

6. She helps Houston Museum of Natural Science achieve liftoff

7. Black Astronomers Highlight Achievements and Obstacles

8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues


1. Nominate our field’s best for the 2021 AAS Prizes and Honors by June 30
From JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

By Aparna Venkatesan (U. of San Francisco), Ed Bertschinger (MIT), Dara Norman (NOIRLab), Sarah Tuttle (U. of Washington, Seattle)

The COVID19 pandemic and the nationwide protests for racial justice have revealed the longstanding injustices and inequities in our society, as well as in academia and the sciences. The pandemic, which shows no signs of slowing down, has already had a documented fallout on academe’s most vulnerable populations, including women, underrepresented minorities and especially women of color, as they try to navigate a radically altered higher education landscape, canceled interviews, and lost professional or research opportunities. Those most at risk are among our most talented, whose voices we most need in our profession in the years to come.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2020/06/nominate-our-fields-best-for-2021-aas.html

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2. NASA Names Headquarters After ‘Hidden Figure’ Mary W. Jackson
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

"NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced Wednesday the agency’s headquarters building in Washington, D.C., will be named after Mary W. Jackson, the first African American female engineer at NASA.

Jackson started her NASA career in the segregated West Area Computing Unit of the agency’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Jackson, a mathematician and aerospace engineer, went on to lead programs influencing the hiring and promotion of women in NASA's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers. In 2019, she was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal."

Read more at

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-names-headquarters-after-hidden-figure-mary-w-jackson

Read more about Mary W. Jackson, the “Hidden Figures,” and today’s Modern Figures, at

https://www.nasa.gov/modernfigures

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3. A Celebration of E. Margaret Burbidge
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Margaret Burbidge, the first woman to serve as AAS President (1976-1978), will be honored on Wednesday, 8 July 2020, 1:00-3:00 pm ET. The event will celebrate her life and science through short talks from her colleagues and collaborators as well as researchers who have benefited from her trailblazing and scientific insights.

Read more and find the link to participate at

https://aas.org/posts/news/2020/06/celebration-e-margaret-burbidge

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4. Astrobites #BlackInAstroWeek posts
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

Astrobites has been posting articles every day this past week for #BlackInAstroWeek.

Read more at

https://astrobites.org/2020/06/20/1981-barbara-williams-becomes-the-first-black-woman-to-get-a-phd

https://astrobites.org/2020/06/22/black-in-astro-ashley-walker

https://astrobites.org/2020/06/23/black-in-astro-science-aspiration

https://astrobites.org/2020/06/24/black-in-astro-cheyenne-polius

https://astrobites.org/2020/06/25/blackinastro-black-women-in-astronomy-and-physics

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5. Researchers Address the ‘Leaky Pipeline’ to Academic Science
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

"In theory, there’s a straightforward path towards an academic STEM career. Remain focused academically, pay special attention to math and sciences, find mentors and keep up the work until you’re publishing original research findings, being selected for grants and making a mark in your field.

In practice, for women and those from backgrounds and ethnicities that are underrepresented in the sciences, the pathway to entry and retainment often includes obstacles that arise from how they are seen by others in these disciplines and how those perceptions affect how they see themselves."

Read more at

https://www.pittwire.pitt.edu/news/researchers-addresses-leaky-pipeline-academic-science

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6. She helps Houston Museum of Natural Science achieve liftoff
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

By Chris Gray

"Carolyn Sumners has been thinking a lot about Mars. Lately the red planet has been all over her house.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science’s curator of astronomy has been sifting through reams of charts, graphs, and other data that will accompany “Mars,” which follows “Moon” and “Gaia” as the museum’s latest large-scale installation by the UK artist Luke Jerram. It opens July 1."

Read more at

https://preview.houstonchronicle.com/families/carolyn-sumners-helps-houston-museum-of-natural-15352794

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7. Black Astronomers Highlight Achievements and Obstacles
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

By Karen Kwon

"One of the forces behind #BlackInAstro week shares her optimism for the future.

Thanks to a series of social media movements organized by Black researchers and nature lovers, science and academia are finally waking up to some of the ways they have pushed out Black people."

Read more at

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/black-astronomers-highlight-achievements-and-obstacles

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8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the 'Your email address' field. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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10. Access to Past Issues

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/AASWOMEN

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered. _______________________________________________ AASWomen Newsletter mailing list -- aaswlist@lists.aas.org To unsubscribe send an email to aaswlist-leave@lists.aas.org

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