Friday, June 12, 2020

AASWOMEN Newsletter for June 12, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 12, 2020
eds: Heather Flewelling, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Patterson, Alessandra Aloisi, and Jeremy Bailin

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. --eds.]


This week's issues:

1. Call to Participate in Strike for Black Lives and Black Survival and Wellness Week

2. Meet Central American-Caribbean Astronomy Bridge Program Fellows - Part 1

3. How Is the Pandemic Affecting AGU Journal Article Submissions?

4. The L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science Prize Applications Open

5. A list of postgraduate resources for minority students hits the mark

6. Astronaut Kathy Sullivan is first woman to dive to deepest point on Earth

7. Media stereotypes confound kids' science ambitions

8. Why we can't let women's STEM gains fall victim to COVID-19

9. Scientists condemn racism and take action with #StrikeforBlackLives this week

10. Job Opportunities

11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues


1. Call to Participate in Strike for Black Lives and Black Survival and Wellness Week
From Gregory Rudnick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Part of this post relates to the already-past #Strike4BlackLives, and also relates to the upcoming Black Survival and Wellness Week, so we hope you will still find it of interest -- eds.]

As a community and society we are grieving the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tony McDade, James Scurlock, Manuel Ellis, and so many others who have been victims of the institutionalized and systemic anti-Black racism that deprives Black people regularly of their lives and livelihood. In this moment of grief and anger we must also confront the ingrained racism within our departments, institutions, disciplines, and communities.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2020/06/call-to-participate-in-strike-for-black.html

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2. Meet Central American-Caribbean Astronomy Bridge Program Fellows - Part 1
From JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The Central American - Caribbean bridge in astrophysics is a program created to mentor and train the next generation of students in astrophysics from that region. This was created because there is an enormous lack of resources and research opportunities for students interested in astrophysics. We hold monthly webinars and invite a speaker every month to talk about their personal life, academic obstacles, and research. The goal is for the students to feel represented, motivated, and capable, especially women in our group. More recently, we began a remote REU-like internship where students are able to complete a mini-project within a four-month period. Last Fall 2019, we had four students from Costa Rica and Honduras who worked with professors from Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. This Spring 2020, we are working with three students from Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador. This opportunity brings research opportunities to these students and connects them to potential advisors and PhD programs.

In this series, we will highlight selected fellows.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2020/06/meet-central-american-caribbean_10.html

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3. How Is the Pandemic Affecting AGU Journal Article Submissions?
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Though it's still early, "AGU journal submissions have not seen a significant decrease in the proportion of female corresponding authors." However, "women in their 30s submitting papers noticeably increased in February but dropped in March and stayed about the same in April". This may reflect extra work at home by early career and/or scientists who are mothers, and AGU editors say they will continue to monitor the situation.

Read more at

https://eos.org/editors-vox/how-is-the-pandemic-affecting-agu-journal-article-submissions

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4. The L’Oréal-Unesco For Women in Science Prize Applications Open
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

"The prize is awarded by The L'Oréal Foundation, The Swedish National Commission for UNESCO, and The Young Academy of Sweden to encourage promising women in the early stages of their research career in science and creating role models for future generations.

The prize will be awarded next time in 2021 and the call for applications is open from June 1st until September 27th 2020."

Read more at

https://www.staff.lu.se/article/the-loreal-unesco-for-women-in-science-prize

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5. A list of postgraduate resources for minority students hits the mark
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Lavontria Miché Aaron, a graduate student in Planetary Science at Johns Hopkins University, compiled a list of postgraduate resources for minority students. She was interviewed by Nature magazine about her experiences and her motivation for creating such a list.

Read the interview at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01997-8

See the list of resources at

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1V_pvhqWliwqLhAVcXikxAEuJPD4mwwgl9LEgOnzN-zM/edit#gid=1417047090.%E2%80%9D

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6. Astronaut Kathy Sullivan is first woman to dive to deepest point on Earth
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Robert Z. Pearlman

"A former NASA astronaut who was the first American woman to walk in space has become the world's first woman to reach the deepest point on Earth.

Kathy Sullivan on Saturday (June 6) dove to Challenger Deep, the lowest-known location on the planet. She is now the first woman and eighth person to descend the 7 miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the crescent-shaped Mariana Trench, located near Guam in the Western Pacific Ocean."

Read more at

https://www.space.com/astronaut-sullivan-challenger-deep.html

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7. Media stereotypes confound kids' science ambitions
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By University of South Australia

"White lab coats and dangerous experiments all epitomize the "mad scientist" from many a Hollywood blockbuster but, even beyond the silver screen, the stereotype lives on, and according to new research, it could mar the next generation of potential scientists."

Read more at

https://phys.org/news/2020-06-media-stereotypes-confound-kids-science.html

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8. Why we can't let women's STEM gains fall victim to COVID-19
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Billie Bonevski

"COVID-19's impact on the economy has been devastating, causing record high numbers of job losses, industry closures, reductions in pay or hours, restructuring of work practices, and disruption to child care and education requiring children to remain at home.

The impact has not been felt equally across society though. One group affected disproportionately is women. A report commissioned by federal science minister Karen Andrews, and published by the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering and Science and Technology Australia has warned that the pandemic will reverse the gains that have been achieved in promoting women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields."

Read more at

https://www.newcastleherald.com.au/story/6784522/covid-19-threatens-womens-stem-gains

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9. Scientists condemn racism and take action with #StrikeforBlackLives this week
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Kimberly Hickok

[Although #StrikeforBlackLives already took place, we hope you will still find this relevant. -- eds.]

"This Wednesday (June 10), thousands of people in the science community will #ShutDownAcademia, #ShutDownSTEM and #StrikeforBlackLives. The events call for scientists across the globe to pause their research, cancel classes and reschedule the day's meetings, so they can spend the day taking action against anti-Black racism.

The #StrikeforBlackLives is led by two accomplished Black scientists, Brian Nord, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago and Fermilab, and Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a cosmologist at the University of New Hampshire. They're supported by members of Particles for Justice, a group of particle physicists who banded together against systemic sexism in academia in late 2018."

Read more at

https://www.space.com/strike-for-black-lives.html

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10. Job Opportunities
For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:
https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity

- Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics at Texas Lutheran University http://www.tlu.edu/jobs/visiting-assistant-professor-of-physics1

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org.

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/AASWOMEN

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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