Friday, June 19, 2020

AASWomen Newsletter for June 19, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of June 19, 2020
eds: JoEllen McBride, Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, Alessandra Aloisi, and Jeremy Bailin

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. Be well! --eds.]

This week's issues:

1. Meet Central American-Caribbean Astronomy Bridge Program Fellows - Part 2

2. Nominate candidates for the The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) Board of Directors

3. APS Webinar on Making Physics Inclusive & Equitable

4. Meet the first all-female Air Force launch weather team who will work SpaceX Starlink launch

5. Moves are afoot in Africa to keep more women in science careers

6. "It's what students look for": the Dutch university that's only hiring women

7. Combating sexual harassment at the NIH

8. Job Opportunities

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Meet Central American-Caribbean Astronomy Bridge Program Fellows - Part 2
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The Central American - Caribbean bridge in astrophysics is a program created to mentor and train the next generation of students in astrophysics from that region. This was created because there is an enormous lack of resources and research opportunities for students interested in astrophysics. We hold monthly webinars and invite a speaker every month to talk about their personal life, academic obstacles, and research. The goal is for the students to feel represented, motivated, and capable, especially women in our group. More recently, we began a remote REU-like internship where students are able to complete a mini-project within a four-month period...In this series, we will highlight selected fellows. If you'd like to learn more about the program and ways you can get involved please visit https://cencabridgeastro.weebly.com

"My name is Nicole Stephanie Mejia Cerros. I was born in Olanchito in the department of Yoro in Honduras. My childhood was a great influence in choosing a career in astronomy. My teachers at school and my parents motivated me to discover and read more about science topics."

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2020/06/meet-central-american-caribbean.html

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2. Nominate candidates for the The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) Board of Directors
From: Stella Kafka [skafka_at_aavso.org]

The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)'s nominating committee is looking for candidates for our Board of Directors. If you want to help us shape our future, or you know someone passionate for non-profit governance and citizen astronomy, please consider a self-nomination or nomination to our board. We aspire to generate a more diverse association, serving an international community of professional and citizen astronomers for science. You don't have to be an observer to participate! If you have any questions please email aavso_at_aavso.org.

More information and a nomination form can be found here:

https://www.aavso.org/invitation-nominees-2020-board

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3. APS Webinar on Making Physics Inclusive & Equitable
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

APS will hold a webinar entitled "From Passion to Action: Levers and Tools for Making Physics Inclusive and Equitable" on June 24th from 2-4 pm EST.

"As physicists interested in the advancement of the discipline we must address systemic barriers in academia that have led to a gross underrepresentation of minorities, particularly Black Americans, in our field.

This webinar will feature a panel of physicists who have been actively involved with increasing diversity in physics and improving its culture. The panel will discuss why everyone from students to teachers to professors to administrators has an important role in building a diverse next generation of physicists. The panel will share ideas and concrete actions on what each of these groups can do to work toward this goal."

Read more and register at

https://www.aps.org/programs/minorities/webinar.cfm

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4. Meet the first all-female Air Force launch weather team who will work SpaceX Starlink launch
From: Matt Greenhouse [matt.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

"When SpaceX launches its ninth batch of Starlink communications satellites early Saturday morning, there will be a group of weather officers on the ground making sure everything is good to go for launch, just like for every launch from the Space Coast.

But for the first time, the weather officers from the 45th Space Wing Weather Squadron working this launch are all women."

Read more at

https://www.floridatoday.com/story/tech/science/space/2020/06/11/meet-first-all-female-air-force-weather-team-work-spacex-starlink-launch-cape-canaveral-florida/5325387002

[article may be behind paywall -- Eds.]

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5. Moves are afoot in Africa to keep more women in science careers
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

by Barbara Tiedeu

Women account for 53% of the world's bachelor's and master's degree graduates and 43% of Ph.D. graduates. But they make up only 28% of researchers in all fields. And, only 30% of women in higher education move into STEM-related fields.

The situation is no different in sub-Saharan Africa; in fact, in some countries in the region it's worse. Only 30% of sub-Saharan researchers in all subject areas are women.

Read more at

https://phys.org/news/2020-06-afoot-africa-women-science-careers.html

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6. "It's what students look for": the Dutch university that's only hiring women
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

"That women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) is a well-known problem. The statistics for gender balance in higher education are similarly bleak: the European Commission estimates that women make up 48% of graduates but hold only 24% of senior academic roles, falling to 15% in Stem. Dutch universities are particularly gender imbalanced, and last year Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE) sat at the bottom of the pile with women representing just 15% of professors.

The university is hoping a bold new approach to hiring practices may change that trajectory. It has made headlines by pledging only to hire women across all academic positions and at all levels until it reaches a target of 30% women professors in every department. New vacancies must be closed to men for the first six months, after which departments may open up the recruitment pool, provided they can demonstrate that no qualified women were available."

Read more at

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2020/jun/15/its-what-students-look-for-the-dutch-university-thats-only-hiring-women

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7. Combating sexual harassment at the NIH
From: Maria Patterson [maria.t.patterson_at_gmail.com]

"Sexual harassment, including gender harassment, presents an unacceptable barrier that prevents women from achieving their rightful place in science, and robs society and the scientific enterprise of diverse and critical talent. As the largest single funder of biomedical research in the world, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) bears a responsibility to take action to put an end to this behavior. In 2019, the NIH began to bolster its policies and practices to address and prevent sexual harassment. This included new communication channels to inform the agency of instances of sexual harassment related to NIH-funded research. This week, the NIH announces a change that will hold grantee institutions and investigators accountable for this misconduct, to further foster a culture whereby sexual harassment and other inappropriate behaviors are not tolerated in the research and training environment."

Read more at

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/368/6497/1291

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8. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity#howtoincrease

- Lecturer of Physics and Astronomy, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas https://shsu.peopleadmin.com/postings/24070

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9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the 'Your email address' field. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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11. Access to Past Issues

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/AASWOMEN

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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