Friday, February 14, 2020

AASWomen Newsletter for February 14, 2020

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 14, 2020
eds: JoEllen McBride, Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and Alessandra Aloisi


Mary Somerville, from Item 2
(Image credit: FLICKR/CatherineCronin)
This week's issues:

1. Meet your CSWA, JoEllen McBride

2. The Three Marys: The women who unlocked Earth, space and life

3. Seven female scientists you may not have heard of - but should know about

4. Symposium on Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in STEMM

5. Every Day Should Be International Day Of Women And Girls In Science

6. These 10 Women Are Changing the Way We Talk About Science

7. Gendered Cheese: Don't Fall For Women In STEM Neuro-Nonsense

8. A Controversial Study Claimed To Explain Why Women Don’t Go Into Science And Tech. It Just Got A 1,113-Word Correction.

9. Green Bank Observatory Fellowships and Grants

10. Job Opportunities

11. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Meet your CSWA, JoEllen McBride
From: Regina Jorgenson via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

JoEllen McBride is an AAAS Mass Media Fellow and an AAS Astronomy Ambassador. She earned her PhD in Physics studying the star formation histories of galaxies in compact groups. She is currently a communications and stewardship writer for Penn Medicine's Development and Alumni Relations office at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also the Advocacy Director for the 500 Women Scientists Philadelphia pod, and she creates astronomy workshops for and is on the board of the American Helicopter Museum in West Chester, PA. In her free time, she writes about astronomy for outlets like Massive, edits Science for the People Magazine, and raises her daughters, Carina and Alessa, with the help of her partner, Ed. She is the lead editor of AASWomen, Blogger in Chief of the Women in Astronomy Blog, and is active in CSWA task groups.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2020/02/meet-your-cswa-joellen-mcbride.html

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2. The Three Marys: The women who unlocked Earth, space and life
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

This article highlights the contributions of three women named Mary to science: Mary Somerville (who also did physical geography work that set the precedent in the field), Mary Anning (who found fossils and developed theories), and Mary Mantell (who discovered the first dinosaur).

Read more at

https://www.varsity.co.uk/science/18660

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3. Seven female scientists you may not have heard of - but should know about
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

BBC news highlights 7 female scientists including Mary Somerville and Jocelyn Bell Burnell!

Read more at

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-51399835

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4. Symposium on Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in STEMM
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

NASEM Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM) Thursday, March 19, 2020 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (EDT) Washington, DC

"This symposium will share the key messages and findings of a soon-to-be released National Academies report focused on addressing the underrepresentation of women in science, engineering, and medicine, which was made possible by the sponsorship of the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and L'Oréal USA. Among the key issues the report addresses are:

- How women's participation and leadership varies across scientific, engineering, and medical disciplines - How the intersection of race and gender affects women of color in science, engineering, and medicine - Which interventions can produce sustained improvements in the representation and leadership of women in science, engineering, and medicine - Why effective interventions haven’t been scaled up or adopted at more institutions"

Read more and register at

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/symposium-on-addressing-the-underrepresentation-of-women-in-stemm-registration-93002826959

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5. Every Day Should Be International Day Of Women And Girls In Science
From: Maria Patterson [maria.t.patterson_at_gmail.com]

"[This past Tuesday was] International Day of Women and Girls in Science - a day established by the United Nations to recognize the essential role of women and girls in science and technology. Marking days like today is one way we can work toward a future where girls and women are fully represented, but I hope they will one day become superfluous, and we can officially retire them. Needless to say, we’re not there yet."

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/taliamilgromelcott/2020/02/11/every-day-should-be-international-day-of-women-and-girls-in-science/#2abf59d82e2d

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6. These 10 Women Are Changing the Way We Talk About Science
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

Looking to fill your Twitter feed with some awesome science communicators? Follow these 10 women!

Read more at

https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/g30878395/women-science

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7. Gendered Cheese: Don’t Fall For Women In STEM Neuro-Nonsense
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com] and Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

Nancy Doyle, a psychologist specializing in neurodiversity, offers a counter-argument to a piece published in The Telegraph last week (linked in the article below). The Telegraph piece argues that women's brains are wired differently than men's and that is why there aren't many women in STEM.

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/drnancydoyle/2020/02/09/gendered-cheese-dont-fall-for-women-in-stem-neuro-nonsense/#2ba4c7424085

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8. A Controversial Study Claimed To Explain Why Women Don't Go Into Science And Tech. It Just Got A 1,113-Word Correction.
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

A science historian at Harvard tried to recreate the results of a study that found that women are more likely to pursue STEM degrees in countries with less gender equity. She found that to reproduce the results she had to make specific assumptions that create a "contrived and distorted picture of the global distribution of women in STEM achievement".

Read more at

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/stephaniemlee/women-stem-gender-equality-paradox-correction

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9. Green Bank Observatory Fellowships and Grants
From: Pat Knezek [pknezek_at_gmail.com]

Green Bank Observatory has established a program that can fund travel for use of the GBT (or of archival GBT data) in astrobiology and broadly related topics. This same program can fund a summer Fellowship or sabbatical position at the Green Bank Observatory.

The deadline for applications is 17 Feb 2020, and details are may be found on the following website:

http://greenbankobservatory.org/grants-in-astrobiology

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10. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity

- Postdoctoral Research Associate - Modeling Exoplanets Plasmas, UMass Lowell https://explorejobs.uml.edu/lowell/en-us/job/503644/postdoctoral-research-associate-modeling-exoplanets-plasmas

- Fully-funded Science and Technology Facilities Council PhD studentships, solar and planetary science, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, UK (UK/EU citizens only) https://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/teaching/graduates/dphil-projects

- Astronomer (Program Director), Division of Astronomical Sciences (AST), National Science Foundation, Alexandria, VA https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/558754300

- Post-doc Position, Specialist in Astronomy Education Research and/or Physics Education Research, Max Planck Institute For Astronomy https://www.mpg.de/14340628/postdochdaoae295

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the 'Your email address' field. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

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13. Access to Past Issues

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/AASWOMEN

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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