Friday, September 6, 2019

AASWomen Newsletter for September 06, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 06, 2019
eds: JoEllen McBride, Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, and Alessandra Aloisi

[We have a *new email address* for receiving submissions to the newsletter: aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. An editor will reply with a confirmation of receipt. Please update us in your contacts, and thank you for your submissions. --eds.]

Mary Ward, from item 6
This week's issues:

1. AAS Board Reflections: Stuart Vogel

2. Astrophysicist releases kids book Under the Stars: Astrophysics for Bedtime to inspire a passion for STEM

3. Women Scientists Form a Policy Advocacy Network in the Mid-Atlantic

4. Fifteen tips to make scientific conferences more welcoming for everyone

5. Survival Tips For Women In Tech: Who else is the only woman on their dev team?

6. Mary Ward: Feminist famous as the first person to be killed in a car accident

7. New data analysis proves science is sexist

8. All-female robotics team wins major awards while slashing stereotypes of women, Latinos in STEM

9. Girls Would do Better in Maths and Science Tests if Exams Were Made Longer, Study Finds

10. A better future for graduate-student mental health

11. Make science PhDs more than just a training path for academia

12. Job Opportunities

13. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. AAS Board Reflections: Stuart Vogel
From: JoEllen McBride via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In order to familiarize the astronomy community with the AAS Board and encourage participation, the CSWA created a Reflection Survey for outgoing AAS Board members to complete after their terms ended in June. Over the coming weeks, we will feature the responses we've received on the Women in Astronomy blog. Enjoy!

Stuart Vogel, PhD is a radio astronomer studying star formation and the interstellar medium in nearby galaxies. He was the director of Maryland’s radio astronomy group for more than ten years when they merged the BIMA and OVRO millimeter-wave arrays and built CARMA. Following that, he was astronomy department chair at Maryland for ten years.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/09/aas-board-reflections-stuart-vogel.html

Back to top.
2. Astrophysicist releases kids book Under the Stars: Astrophysics for Bedtime to inspire a passion for STEM
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Amy Martin

"Kids can ask some pretty hard questions. Why is the sky blue? What happens if you fall into a black hole? What is a shooting star?

Now there's a book that offers some answers. Astrophysicist and Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) ambassador Lisa Harvey-Smith was at Questacon on Wednesday ahead of the launch of her new children's book Under the Stars: Astrophysics for Bedtime on October 1."

Read more at

https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6367388/the-book-that-inspires-kids-to-reach-for-the-stars

Back to top.
3. Women Scientists Form a Policy Advocacy Network in the Mid-Atlantic
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By JoEllen McBride

"Many societal challenges are rooted in structural inefficiencies and inequities that require government solutions informed by science. Women experience burden and harm from inaction in distinct ways, but our voices are underrepresented in both the advocacy and policy processes. We believe women scientists have untapped potential to leverage their expertise and perspective and to connect with their elected officials to lead discussions about policies that impact their communities."

Read more at

https://blog.ucsusa.org/science-blogger/women-scientists-form-policy-advocacy-network-in-mid-atlantic

Back to top.
4. Fifteen tips to make scientific conferences more welcoming for everyone
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Jess Wade

"When you’re attending a scientific conference of over 20,000 people, it’s surprisingly easy to feel alone. International conferences are a rite of passage of a scientific researcher and science would benefit if we made them more welcoming for everyone."

Read more at

https://physicsworld.com/a/fifteen-tips-to-make-scientific-conferences-more-welcoming-for-everyone

Back to top.
5. Survival Tips For Women In Tech: Who else is the only woman on their dev team?
From: Heather Flewelling [flewelling.heather_at_gmail.com]

"Yesterday I saw a tweet from Erin Fox @erinfoox where she asked a simple question: 'Who else is the only woman on their dev team?When I answered her that I’d been the only woman dev most of my career, she asked me if I had any survival tips, and I wrote her a list of 24 tips. Quite frankly it could easily be 50. I will list the 24 here, with a little more elaboration."

Read more at

https://patricia.no/2018/09/06/survival_tips_for_women_in_tech.html

Back to top.
6. Mary Ward: Feminist famous as the first person to be killed in a car accident
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Henry Macrory

"Mary Ward's life ended suddenly and shockingly on a quiet country road on August 31, 1869. Fearful Death of a Lady, ran the headline in the local newspaper. The manner of her demise 150 years ago earned her a macabre place in the annals of motoring as the victim of the world's first fatal car accident. But Mary deserves to be remembered for more than her violent end, because she was as unusual in life as she was in death - a talented and tenacious woman who broke through glass ceilings in a man's world with breathtaking success."

Read more at

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/life/1172582/mary-ward-feminist-killed-in-car-crash-anniversary-death

Back to top.
7. New data analysis proves science is sexist
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

The science gender gap is real. In a study of "20 years of data on over 5,000 individuals, spanning 28 societies in four countries", researchers at the University of Canterbury have shown that even though "efforts to tackle gender bias have been partly successful", when the stakes are high, women lose out.

Read more at

https://phys.org/news/2019-09-analysis-science-sexist.html

Read the journal article at

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.190633

Back to top.
8. All-female robotics team wins major awards while slashing stereotypes of women, Latinos in STEM
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Katie Kidelan

"An all-female team of American college students is taking the robotics competition circuit by storm.

The Arizona State University team, Desert WAVE (Women in Autonomous Vehicle Engineering), was formed last August and they say they are one of just two all-female robotics teams competing in the world, along with a team at Texas A&M University."

Read more at

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/female-robotics-team-wins-major-awards-slashing-stereotypes-65365260

Back to top.
9. Girls Would do Better in Maths and Science Tests if Exams Were Made Longer, Study Finds
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

In a recent study published in the journal Nature Communications, researchers found that "females are better at sustaining their performance over a long period when compared to males". Thus, "[i]ncreasing the length of tests could help to reduce the gender gap in test scores, as girls could put the extra time to good use as they can sustain their performance..."

Read more at

https://www.newsweek.com/girls-would-do-better-maths-science-tests-if-exams-were-made-longer-study-finds-1457327

Read the journal article at

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11691-y

Back to top.
10. A better future for graduate-student mental health
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Chris Woolston

"An ambitious research project aims to assess the state of mental-health resources and support for graduate students. The 22-month initiative is a joint venture of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) in Washington DC and the Jed Foundation, a non-profit organization in New York City that focuses on the mental health of young adults. The initiative will explore current schemes and programmes centred on student wellness at CGS member universities in the United States and Canada, and provide recommendations for future approaches to promote mental and emotional well-being in students."

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02584-7

Back to top.
11. Make science PhDs more than just a training path for academia
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Sarah Anderson

"My committee member looked up from the document in his hand, which detailed my ideas for my research proposal. He cleared his throat: 'You know, when you apply for faculty positions...' he began. I gave a quick, impulsive nod in response, but thought to myself, 'That's never going to happen.'

I’m a PhD candidate in chemistry with no intention of pursuing a career in academia, and I’m certainly not alone: out of 81 students in my programme, only 40% plan to go into academia."

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02586-5

Back to top.
12. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Assistant, Associate or Full Professor, Department of Astronomy, The University of California, Berkeley https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/JPF02260

- NTT Faculty (Academic Professional) in Astronomy Instruction - Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/352b0472

- Assistant, Associate, or Full Research Scientist, various disciplines, University of California, San Diego https://apol-recruit.ucsd.edu/JPF02126

- Deputy Division Director, Division of Astronomical Sciences (AST), Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Alexandria, VA https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/541678400

- James Arthur Postdoctoral Fellowship, The Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics (CCPP) at NYU https://jobregister.aas.org/ad/032cb701

Back to top.
13. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

Back to top.
14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send an email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org. A list moderator will add your email to the list. They will reply to your message to confirm that they have added you.

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/postorius/lists/aaswlist.lists.aas.org and enter the email address you wish to subscribe in the ‘Your email address’ field. You will receive an email from ‘aaswlist-confirm’ that you must reply to. There may be a delay between entering your email and receiving the confirmation message. Check your Spam or Junk mail folders for the message if you have not received it after 2 hours.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Send an email to aaswlist-leave_at_lists.aas.org from the email address you wish to remove from the list. You will receive an email from 'aaswlist-confirm' that you must reply to which will complete the unsubscribe.

Leave AAS Women or change your membership settings through the online portal:

Go to https://lists.aas.org/accounts/signup to create an account with the online portal. After confirming your account you can see the lists you are subscribed to and update your settings.

Back to top.
15. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

Back to top.

No comments :

Post a Comment