Friday, December 30, 2016

AASWomen Newsletter for December 30, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of December 30, 2016
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. Events at the 229th American Astronomical Society Meeting

2. #AAS229: Making the Most of the AAS Winter Meeting with Twitter

3. AAS Equity Survey Responses

4. Taking Action on the Gender Bias in STEM

5. Working Life: Following my lucky star

6. Gone in 2016: 10 Notable Women in Science and Technology

7. Kavli Summer Program in Astrophysics 2017

8. Job Opportunities

9. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

11. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Events at the 229th American Astronomical Society Meeting
From: Christina Richey via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Several key events will be occurring at the 229th American Astronomical Society meeting, held January 4th-8th at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Conference Center in Grapevine, Texas. Danny Barringer posted to Astrobetter for the upcoming meeting, and Jason Wright had previously written a first timer's guide to the AAS meeting for Astrobetter. The AAS has posted an important update for the winter meeting (after receiving feedback from the 227th meeting), which includes "Grab & Go" Meals and Restaurant Discounts, Complimentary Shuttle Service, Bigger Badges for Accessibility, and Enhancements to the Exhibit Hall (including the announcement of the STARtorialist booth).

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/12/events-at-229th-american-astronomical.html

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2. #AAS229: Making the Most of the AAS Winter Meeting with Twitter
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

It can be intimidating to attend the AAS winter meeting, especially the first time. This winter over 4,000 astronomers will gather in Grapevine, Texas to exchange ideas, discuss research, and network with other professionals in astronomy. The program can be overwhelming, with thousands of oral and poster presentations as well as dozens of workshops and events. But for our relatively small community, it’s also a fun week to reconnect with friends and meet new people who may become lifelong colleagues.

Read the guide at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/12/aas229-making-most-of-aas-winter.html

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3. AAS Equity Survey Responses
From: Sarah Tuttle via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

We present the responses to a community-led questionnaire for candidates for AAS election on their views of issues relating to inclusion and equity in astronomy. The questionnaire (which was not endorsed or sponsored by AAS or its committees) was sent out to candidates on Dec 4, requesting a response by Dec 14. This short time scale was set by a desire to collect responses before the AAS election, voting for which has now opened. We recognize that this was also a time when many candidates (as well as the folks who helped put together this survey) faced many pressures and demands from the end of the semester and final exams. We are grateful to all of those candidates who in this busy time were able to make time to respond.

Read about the responses at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/12/aas-equity-survey-responses.html

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4. Taking Action on the Gender Bias in STEM
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Today’s guest blogger, Anne Virkki, works as a postdoctoral research scientist in the planetary radar group of the Arecibo Observatory. She is originally from Finland, received her PhD from the University of Helsinki, and soon after defending escaped the dark and cold weather to the heat of Puerto Rico.

In the last AAS Division for Planetary Science meeting in October I joined the Women in Planetary Science lunch and discussion event. We discussed the small number of women in many of the spacecraft science teams as well as editorial boards of scientific journals and even smaller numbers of women from the different ethnic minorities. I find the event useful but felt that the discussion never got into the very core of the problem or practical actions on how to tackle it.

What we did discuss was the unconscious bias, but mainly on the level of employers choosing the future employees and how to make everyone included at the work places.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/12/taking-action-on-gender-bias-in-stem.html

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5. Working Life: Following my lucky star
From: Rick Fienberg [rick.fienberg_at_aas.org]

Nancy Grace Roman has a wonderful essay in the Dec. 9th issue of Science.

“I am glad I ignored the many people who told me that I could not be an astronomer.”

Read the full essay at

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1346

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6. Gone in 2016: 10 Notable Women in Science and Technology
From: Matthew Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

"This year marked the passing of some of our most beloved cultural icons—from David Bowie, Prince, and George Michael to Harper Lee, Gwen Ifill, and Zaha Hadid. But we also lost the developer of the first effective treatment for sickle cell disease, the co-discoverer of dark matter, and the creator of a 3-D printer that spits out living cells as 'bio-ink.'"

Read about these women at

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/voices/gone-in-2016-10-notable-women-in-science-and-technology

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7. Kavli Summer Program in Astrophysics 2017
From: Pascale Garaud [pgaraud_at_soe.ucsc.edu]

The 5th installment of the Kavli Summer Program in Astrophysics (formerly ISIMA), will take place at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen from July 10th to August 18th, 2017, on the topic of "Astrophysics with gravitational wave detections", and will be directed by Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz (UCSC) and Ilya Mandel (Birmingham).

Applications are now open for both students and senior participants (postdocs and faculty), on the website

https://kspa.soe.ucsc.edu/2017

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8. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Visiting Assistant Professor in Astronomy at Indiana University http://www.astro.indiana.edu/visitingprofessor.shtml

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9. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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10. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

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To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

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Google Groups Subscribe Help:

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11. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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