Friday, August 22, 2014

AASWOMEN Newsletter for August 22, 2014

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of August 22, 2014
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. 'Women in Science' Groups As Instruments of Change

2. Why So Few? Department Climate and Culture I

3. Women Less Likely to Get Tenure Even With the Same Research Productivity

4. CNU Professor Pens Book about Early History of Women in Science Fields

5. Science Media Beset with Gender Gaps

6. Job Opportunities

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. 'Women in Science' Groups As Instruments of Change

From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Reposted from the July Issue of Status: A Report on Women in Astronomy. By Meredith Danowski, Ph.D. Student, Department of Astronomy, Boston University

There are grants that need to be written, data that need to be analyzed, and courses that need to be taught. Juggling the every day work of science can be difficult, but it is often the tasks that fall outside the job description that cause the most stress. Maybe you’re searching for childcare, eldercare, or healthcare. Maybe you watch laundry pile up next to the remnants of a long-lost hobby. Maybe you are experiencing a harassing work environment. It is in those moments of frustration and difficulty that we realize that we need friends, we need mentors, and we need a supportive community.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/08/women-in-science-groups-as-instruments.html

Back to top.

2. Why So Few? Department Climate and Culture I

From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The 2010 report entitled, Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), investigates climate and culture in science and engineering departments at colleges and universities. These areas are especially important for women - both students and faculty.

The graph shows that among first-year college students, women are less likely than men to say that they are interested in majoring in a STEM field. The difference is most pronounced in engineering (shown in green) and computer science (shown in red). However, women are more likely to major in the biological/agricultural sciences.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/08/why-so-few-department-climate-and.html

Back to top.

3. Women Less Likely to Get Tenure Even With the Same Research Productivity

From: Caroline Simpson [simpsoncai_at_gmail.com]

by Scott Jaschik

In discussions about the gender gap among tenured professors at research universities, there is little dispute that there are far more men than women with tenure in most disciplines. But why? Many have speculated that men are outperforming women in research, which is particularly valued over teaching and service at research universities. With women (of those with children) shouldering a disproportionate share of child care, the theory goes, they may not be able to keep up with publishing and research to the same extent as their male counterparts.

A study presented here Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association finds that those assumptions may be untrue in some disciplines. The study compared tenure rates at research universities in computer science, English and sociology -- and then controlled for research productivity.

Read the full article at:

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/18/study-raises-questions-about-why-women-are-less-likely-men-earn-tenure-research

Back to top.

4. CNU Professor Pens Book about Early History of Women in Science Fields

From: Meredith Hughes [amhughes_at_wesleyan.edu]

by Sarah J. Pawlowski

... as one Christopher Newport University professor shows in her recent book, efforts to encourage girls to get involved in science are not new. In fact, there's evidence of such work dating back to World War II, before the women's' rights movement in the 1960s and '70s. And some of the obstacles that hindered progress back then still exist, she said.

Read more at:

http://articles.dailypress.com/2014-08-19/news/dp-nws-cnu-professor-book-science-stem-20140819_1_cnu-professor-science-fair-science-jobs

Or check out the book, "Searching for Scientific Womanpower: Technocratic Feminism and the Politics of National Security, 1940-1980," on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Searching-Scientific-Womanpower-Technocratic-1940-1980/dp/1469610817

Back to top.

5. Science Media Beset with Gender Gaps

From: Meredith Hughes [amhughes_at_wesleyan.edu]

by Curtis Brainard

In the fall of 2005, I and a couple hundred other new students at Columbia University’s journalism school walked into a lecture hall for a series of welcome speeches, and two things happened that impressed me. I learned from one of the dean’s that somewhere around two-thirds of us were female. And Jill Abramson, who was then the managing editor of The New York Times and our keynote speaker, took a few moments out of her talk to address the women in room, telling them that could have lives and careers.

So much for His Girl Friday, I thought, and good riddance. But after a short stint as the Times’ first female executive editor, Abramson was curtly dismissed earlier this year, and journalism schools have turned out to be a “leaky pipeline”.

Read more at:

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/voices/2014/08/21/science-media-beset-with-gender-gaps

Back to top.

6. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

Sun-Earth Physical Modeler - Undergraduate, Graduate Level

https://www.nwra.com/jobs/sun_earth_modeler.php

Back to top.

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

Back to top.

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

Back to top.

9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

Back to top.