Friday, July 26, 2019

AASWOMEN Newsletter for July 26, 2019

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
At the Mojave Desert in California on Thursday, July 18, 2019 over 107,000 solar mirrors reflected the moonlight to create a portrait of Margaret Hamilton. She led the team that developed the onboard flight software of Apollo 11. (Credit: Google)
AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of July 26, 2019
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Maria Patterson, JoEllen McBride, and Alessandra Aloisi

[AAS has migrated their email system to Microsoft Exchange, so please check your spam folder if you did not receive the newsletter this week. It is no longer possible to subscribe or unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter by means of Google Groups. We have updated our subscribe and unsubscribe instructions below. Please follow us on social media for updates and thank you for bearing with us as we work out all the kinks.
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This week's issues:

1. Celebrating the Women of Apollo

2. A moonlit tribute to a moon landing icon

3. Still Soliciting Memories of Margaret Burbidge

4. Imaging Women in the Space Age

5. The Woman Who Discovered the Cause of Global Warming Was Long Overlooked

6. Women in science: Smashing glass ceilings and glass walls

7. Does Gender Bias Still Affect Women in Science?

8. Inclusion is what makes diversity stick

9. Developing Skills for Leadership Roles

10. The reward and risk of social media for academics

11. Job Opportunities

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Celebrating the Women of Apollo
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu] via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

“Splashdown! Today marks the 50th anniversary of the return of Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins, after a historic mission that saw Neil and Buzz on the lunar surface for about 3 hours. In mid-1969, there were about 100 women, including 16 engineers, serving in top positions at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. But thousands of other women around the country also supported the Apollo program, before, during, and after 1969. Many of them have recently been interviewed as part of the 50th anniversary, and their stories have appeared in various news outlets. For easy reference, we list many here and you can find more here and here. If you find even more (and we hope you do!), please let us know in the comments section. As we go forward to the Moon with Artemis, including the first women landing on the lunar surface by 2024 and onward to Mars, women around the world will continue to leave indelible marks on the Moon and throughout the solar system.”

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2019/07/celebrating-women-of-apollo.html

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2. A moonlit tribute to a moon landing icon
From: Jessica Mink [jmink_at_cfa.harvard.edu]

This is a pretty cool tribute to Margaret Hamilton on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing enabled by the onboard computer for which she headed the programming team. A moonlight-generated image of her and the Lunar Module used 107,00 mirrors over 1.4 square miles in the Mojave Desert at the Ivanpah Solar Facility.

Read more at

https://blog.google/products/maps/margaret-hamilton-apollo-11-tribute

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3. Still Soliciting Memories of Margaret Burbidge
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

Our form for recording your memories of Dr. Margaret Burbidge is still open! Please share your memories for our online birthday card by August 2nd.

Access the form at

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe705PvYzN8rCoAuMN536VZb-WAlHAYs94gbE2EmyCVgJBtIw/viewform

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4. Imaging Women in the Space Age
From: Rick Fienberg [rick.fienberg_at_aas.org>

“July 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, and to help celebrate, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) is presenting a new exhibition entitled “Imaging Women in the Space Age,” curated by Dr. Julie Wosk, author of Women and the Machine. The exhibit runs from July 13 to November 3, 2019.”

Read more at

https://nysci.org/imaging-women-in-the-space-age

See also note on the AAS website at

https://aas.org/posts/news/2019/07/imaging-women-space-age-lands-new-york

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5. The Woman Who Discovered the Cause of Global Warming Was Long Overlooked. Her Story Is a Reminder to Champion All Women Leading on Climate
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com] and Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Katharine Wilkinson

"Eunice Newton Foote rarely gets the credit she’s due. The American scientist, who was born exactly 200 years ago on Wednesday, was the first woman in climate science. It was back in 1856 that Foote theorized that changes in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could affect the Earth’s temperature. She broke scientific ground that remains more relevant than ever in 2019, but history overlooked her until just a few years ago."

Read more at

https://time.com/5626806/eunice-foote-women-climate-science

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6. Women in science: Smashing glass ceilings and glass walls
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Helen Briggs

"A woman engineer who worked on the moon landing spoke this week of how she was once told the control room was no place for women. Things have changed a lot in 50 years, but not as fast as some had hoped. BBC News spoke to five scientists from different generations who are breaking barriers in their field."

Read more at

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48953793

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7. Does Gender Bias Still Affect Women in Science?
From: Alessandra Aloisi [aloisi_at_stsci.edu]

By Rachel L. Roper

“The percentage of women employed in professional scientific positions has been low but is increasing over time. The U.S. National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation have both implemented programs to improve women’s participation in science, and many universities and companies have diversity and equity programs. While most faculty and scientists believe that they are fair and unbiased, numerous well-designed studies published in leading peer-reviewed journals show that gender bias in sciences and medicine is widespread and persistent today in both faculty and students.”

Read more at

https://mmbr.asm.org/content/83/3/e00018-19

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8. Inclusion is what makes diversity stick
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Marny Smith

"As an experienced Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) Consultant, Juliette Austin’s mission is to be a conscientious change agent and disruptor in increasing representation and belonging in the workplace. That mission has guided her in the D&I space where she manages and leads D&I initiatives across major global organizations. She partners with organizations to help them create spaces that normalize and celebrate differences. Austin has worked in diversity and inclusion at Ernst & Young, Canon USA, Buzzfeed, and more. She is currently a DEI & Team Effectiveness, Internal Consultant at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation."

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gradsoflife/2019/07/19/inclusion-is-what-makes-diversity-stick-a-di-expert-offers-insight/#47d86adf77bd

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9. Developing Skills for Leadership Roles
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

Many agencies and companies have programs to support early career professionals, but support for mid-career professionals is rare. Two recent articles provide guidance and advice on how to develop skills in leadership rolls so that advancement to the next professional level can be achieved.

Read about specific advice for developing women for leadership roles at

https://www.smartbrief.com/original/2019/07/how-succeed-developing-women-your-team

Read about how to develop leadership skills in general at

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01936-7?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=981a2a7013-briefing-dy-20190628&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-981a2a7013-42077799

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10. The reward and risk of social media for academics
From: JoEllen McBride [joellen.mcbride_at_gmail.com]

By Ben Britton, Chris Jackson, Jessica Wade

"We are three academics who are active on social media. We explore the motivations for and benefits of engaging with social media, as well as its costs and risks. Overall, we believe this engagement to be a net benefit for us, our employers and for wider society."

Read more at

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41570-019-0121-3?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=2fabe86eff-briefing-dy-20190723&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-2fabe86eff-43999585

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11. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Planetarium and Physics Laboratory Manager, High Point University https://highpoint.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/HighPoint/job/High-Point-University/Planetarium-and-Physics-Laboratory-Manager_R0002051

- Senior AO Scientist Position, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory http://www.lbto.org/senior-ao-scientist---201907.html

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12. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

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13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

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14. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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