Friday, January 27, 2017

AASWomen Newsletter for January 27, 2017

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of January 27, 2017
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. Why I Marched

2. What can your CSWA do for you??

3. Vera Rubin Memorial Service 3:00pm Sunday, February 26, Washington DC

4. Young Girls Are Less Apt To Think That Women Are Really, Really Smart

5. Buddha and the Owl: Post-election Practice, Not Perfect

6. The Story of NASA’s Real “Hidden Figures”

7. Job Opportunities

8. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Why I Marched
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Millions of people marched this weekend in response to the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States. My social media feed was dominated by photos of my friends and family peacefully protesting all around the country and world. People protested for many reasons. I asked people in our community to share with me why they marched. If you want to add your voice/photos to this post, please contact me.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2017/01/why-i-marched.html

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2. What can your CSWA do for you??
From: Daryl Haggard via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This is a week of calls to action. If you have not taken action to advocate for science, to advocate for women, to advocate for people of color, to advocate for LGBTQIA people, to advocate for astronomers with disabilities, to safeguard the standing of the United States in the World, to protect your children's future... it's time you get it together. It's time you advocate for yourself. It's time to ask us to advocate for you.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2017/01/what-can-your-cswa-do-for-you.html

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3. Vera Rubin Memorial Service 3:00pm Sunday, February 26, Washington DC
From: Alycia Weinberger [aweinberger_at_carnegiescience.edu]

As you all probably know, Vera Rubin died on December 25. I among many, miss her friendship, her devotion to promoting women in science, and her curiosity for the Universe. Her family has asked that I pass on the following information about a memorial service to be held in Washington, DC. I hope that many of her friends and colleagues will be able to attend:

The memorial service will be at Temple Sinai, 3100 Military Rd NW, Washington, DC 20015, at 3:00pm on Sunday, February 26. This will be followed by a reception in the social hall, lasting until about 5, with light fare provided.

Vera was a contributor to this newsletter on many occasions. In the mid-2000s, for example, she exhorted us to have excellent women speak at symposia and to nominate more women for prizes. These calls to action are still relevant today, the day of the women’s march that I suspect Vera would have wanted to attend.

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4. Young Girls Are Less Apt To Think That Women Are Really, Really Smart
From: Cristina Thomas [cthomas_at_psi.edu] and Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

"Girls in the first few years of elementary school are less likely than boys to say that their own gender is "really, really smart," and less likely to opt into a game described as being for super-smart kids, research finds. The study, which appears Thursday in Science, comes amid a push to figure out why women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. One line of research involves stereotypes, and how they might influence academic and career choices."

Read more at

http://n.pr/2kolkyq http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6323/389

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5. Buddha and the Owl: Post-election Practice, Not Perfect
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Aomawa Shields

"I haven’t known what I wanted to say about the last couple of months. People have been saying a lot. Many people – half of the country, for whom things did not go according to our plan on election day – are afraid. And fear is a powerful emotion."

Read more at

https://variablestargirl.com/2017/01/24/post-election-practice-not-perfect

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6. The Story of NASA’s Real “Hidden Figures”
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Elizabeth Howell

"In the 1960s, Mercury astronauts Alan Shepard, Gus Grissom, John Glenn and others absorbed the accolades of being the first men in space. Behind the scenes, they were supported by hundreds of unheralded NASA workers, including "human computers" who did the calculations for their orbital trajectories. "Hidden Figures," a 2016 book by Margot Lee Shetterly and a movie based on the book, celebrates the contributions of some of those workers."

Read more at

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-story-of-nasas-real-ldquo-hidden-figures-rdquo

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7. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: https://cswa.aas.org/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Assistant Professor In-Residence, Physics (Storrs or Stamford Campus, University of Connecticut) https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/8793

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8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aaswlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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10. Access to Past Issues

https://cswa.aas.org/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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