Friday, September 9, 2016

AASWomen Newsletter for September 09, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of September 09, 2016
eds: Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, Heather Flewelling, Cristina Thomas, and Maria Patterson

This week's issues:

1. CSWA Chair = NASA Deputy Program Scientist for OSIRIS-REx = LAUNCH TODAY!

2. The Gender Factor in Conference Presentations

3. Female Scientists Turn to Data to Fight Lack of Representation on Panels

4. Do women in STEM careers suffer a ‘marriage market’ penalty?

5. On Being a Black Female Math Whiz During the Space Race

6. Job Opportunities

7. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. CSWA Chair = NASA Deputy Program Scientist for OSIRIS-REx = LAUNCH TODAY!
From: Daryl Haggard via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Christina Richey, chair of the CSWA, is participating today in the launch of NASA's OSIRIS-REx Mission as deputy program scientist at NASA Headquarters. OSIRIS-REx will journey to the carbonaceous asteroid Bennu to collect surface samples that may trace the earliest composition of our Solar System, including water and organic molecules. The mission will also map Bennu's surface and test the Yarkovsky effect. The launch is garnering lots of public interest as one of what could be a number of asteroid sampling and surveying missions supported by NASA.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2016/09/cswa-chair-nasa-deputy-program.html

Back to top.
2. The Gender Factor in Conference Presentations
From: Alexander Rudolph [alrudolph_at_cpp.edu]

by Scott Jaschik

Stickers proclaiming "Women Also Know Stuff" were distributed last week at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

A group by that name created a website this year listing more than 1,000 female scholars in political science, organized by areas of expertise and with links to the scholars' websites, email addresses and more. The expertise areas are detailed, making it difficult for anyone to say that they can't think of any women who study, for example, political economy or international law or the politics of crime, among many other categories.

Read more at

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/09/07/new-study-suggests-continued-bias-academic-conference-panel-selections?utm_source=Inside+Higher+Ed&utm_campaign=2efe45949d-DNU20160907&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1fcbc04421-2efe45949d-198437205&mc_cid=2efe45949d&mc_eid=208b5d19b2

Back to top.
3. Female Scientists Turn to Data to Fight Lack of Representation on Panels
From: Michael Rupen [mrupen_at_aoc.nrao.edu]

By Apoorva Mandavilli

One day in August 2015, the Princeton University neuroscientist Yael Niv saw an email notice of a conference on deep brain stimulation, a hot topic in treatment for depression and other mental disorders. Dr. Niv noticed that none of the 21 scientists scheduled to speak were women.

This was not the first time Dr. Niv had lamented a skewed lineup.

For years, she had tried to persuade other conference organizers, sometimes successfully, to invite more women to speak. But something about this particular conference, perhaps that the organizers were women, pushed her and about 20 other female scientists to take action. Over a series of furious emails that night, they decided that the best approach they could take was scientific: They would collect data — irrefutable evidence — on the numbers of male and female speakers.

Read more at

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/science/gender-bias-scientific-conferences.html?_r=0

Back to top.
4. Do women in STEM careers suffer a ‘marriage market’ penalty?
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

In a survey of 500 students at New York University, investigators found that students believe women who major in science or business suffer a “marriage market” penalty. While the surveyed students do not believe that becoming a scientist or businesswoman would completely preclude them from marriage or childbearing, surveyed women indicated that "majoring in science or business would reduce their chances of being married at age 23 by 10% and their odds of being married at age 30 by nearly 15%."

Read more at

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/a-surprising-reason-why-college-women-arent-going-into-stem-2016-09-02

Read the report at

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/staff_reports/sr792.pdf?la=en

Back to top.
5. On Being a Black Female Math Whiz During the Space Race
From: Heather Flewelling [heather_at_ifa.hawaii.edu]

by Cara Buckley

HAMPTON, Va. — Growing up here in the 1970s, in the shadow of Langley Research Center, where workers helped revolutionize air flight and put Americans on the moon, Margot Lee Shetterly had a pretty fixed idea of what scientists looked like: They were middle class, African-American and worked at NASA, like her dad.

It would be years before she learned that this was far from the American norm. And that many women in her hometown defied convention, too, by having vibrant, and by most standards, unusual careers.

Read more at

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/books/on-being-black-female-math-whizzes-during-the-space-race.html

Back to top.
6. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

-Several PhD Positions in Solar System Science https://www.mps.mpg.de/phd/applynow

-Faculty Position in the Computational or Theoretical Astrophysics of Strongly Gravitating Systems http://physics.unh.edu/jobs

Back to top.
7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

Back to top.
8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

Back to top.
9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

Back to top.