Friday, May 27, 2016

AASWOMEN Newsletter for May 27, 2016

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of May 27, 2016
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Elysse Voyer, & Heather Flewelling

This week's issues:

1. A Data Driven Approach to Ending the Wage Gap

2. A 'Devastating Account' of Diversity at Yale

3. Transgender Physicists Face Fresh Challenges

4. Avoiding Gender Bias in Reference Writing

5. African American women in the early space program

6. The L'Oreal-UNESCO Manifesto For Women in Science

7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues


1. A Data Driven Approach to Ending the Wage Gap
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

More than 20 years have passed since the National Committee on Pay Equity first called for action on the gender wage gap. But not much has changed. Women continue to earn less than men, and research shows that women often have less successful salary negotiations, sacrificing tens of thousands of dollars in future earnings. As a woman who works in the tech industry, I often find myself asking: What will it take to truly drive change and close the gender wage gap?

For me, the answer is data.

To read the full article, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.ca/2016/05/a-data-driven-approach-to-ending-wage.html

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2. A ‘Devastating Account’ of Diversity at Yale
From: Daryl Haggard via

by Beth McMurtrie

Yale University has failed repeatedly to execute ambitious plans to diversify its faculty, praised inclusion while enabling a climate hostile to many female and minority professors and graduate students, and experienced a "lost decade" where budget tightening eroded earlier gains in diversifying the professoriate.

Those are the findings of an unsparing report released on Tuesday by the Senate of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Written by an ad hoc committee formed in January, the "Report on Faculty Diversity and Inclusivity in FAS" notes signs of progress since Yale began its first formal effort to recruit faculty members from diverse backgrounds, in 1972. Women, for example, are better represented across departments than they once were. And the university made significant advances in hiring women and minority professors from 1999 to 2007.

To read more, please see

http://chronicle.com/article/A-Devastating-Account-of/236598

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3. Transgender Physicists Face Fresh Challenges
From: APS News via aps.org/publications/apsnews/

by Sophia Chen

While presenting the survey results of the APS report LGBT Climate in Physics Elena Long mentioned that she can't fly through North Carolina anymore. "I can't use the Charlotte airport anymore because I could be arrested for using the restroom between my flights," said Long, a postdoc who works in nuclear research at the University of New Hampshire.

The reason? Long identifies as transgender, and North Carolina passed a law this March that requires transgender people to use public bathrooms that correspond to the sex on their birth certificates, instead of the gender with which they identify. Beyond airport layovers, transgender physicists like Long wouldn't be able to safely attend conferences in North Carolina without careful planning by APS.

And it is now a practical issue: APS is planning to hold its Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 2018.

To read more, please see

http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201605/transgender.cfm

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4. Avoiding Gender Bias in Reference Writing
From: Daryl Haggard [daryl.haggard_at_mcgill.ca]

[This is a handy guide to writing good reference letters! -Eds]

Got a great student? Planning to write a super letter of reference? Don't fall into these common traps based on unconscious gender bias:

https://feministphilosophers.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/arizona.jpg

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5. African American women in the early space program
From: Matthew Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

Uncovering a Tale of Rocket Science, Race and the '60s

By Cara Buckley

Taraji P. Henson hates math, and Octavia Spencer has a paralyzing fear of calculus, but that didn't stop either actress from playing two of the most important mathematicians the world hasn't ever known.

Both women are starring in "Hidden Figures," a forthcoming film that tells the astonishing true story of female African-American mathematicians who were invaluable to NASA’s space program in the Jim Crow South in the early 1960s.

Ms. Henson plays Katherine Johnson, a math savant who calculated rocket trajectories for, among other spaceflights, the Apollo trips to the moon. Ms. Spencer plays her supervisor, Dorothy Vaughan, and the R&B star Janelle Monáe plays Mary Jackson, a trailblazing engineer who worked at the agency, too.

To read more, please see

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/movies/taraji-p-henson-octavia-spencer-hidden-figures-rocket-science-and-race.html

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6. The L'Oreal-UNESCO Manifesto For Women in Science
From: Ludivine Desmonts-Mornet <ludivine.desmonts-mornet_at_loreal.com>

On the occasion of the 18th edition of the "For Women in Science" awards, L’Oréal and UNESCO have launched the 'Manifesto For Women in Science'. Their ambition is to take a committed approach to the general public in raising awareness of the issues preventing women from pursuing life-long scientific careers and to instigate actions that will make a difference.

You are invited to sign the Manifesto, and to encourage the people around you to do the same.

To learn more, please see

http://www.forwomeninscience.com

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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