Friday, March 20, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for March 20, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 20, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. The Gender Breakdown of the Applicant Pool for Tenure-Track Faculty Positions at a Sample of North American Research Astronomy Programs

2. Why Did You Decide on a PhD in Astronomy and not Physics?

3. 10 Most Influential Female Scientists

4. Women-In-STEM Pioneer: You Can Always Tell An Ambitious Woman By The Shape Of Her Head

5. Attention Undergrads: Female Tech Program from JPMorgan Chase

6. APS/AIP Science and Technology Postdoctoral Policy Fellowship: Apply by April 5

7. Job Opportunities

8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

10. Access to Past Issues


1. The Gender Breakdown of the Applicant Pool for Tenure-Track Faculty Positions at a Sample of North American Research Astronomy Programs

From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Today's guest blogger is Todd Thompson. Todd is a professor in the Department of Astronomy at the Ohio State University. His research involves core-collapse supernovae, the birth of neutron stars, the origin of the heavy elements, gamma ray bursts, stellar and relativistic winds, and magnetars; the physics, structure, and feedback processes of starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei; and few-body dynamics of stars and their compact objects.]

Introduction

The demographics of the field of Astronomy is an active area of investigation. Among many characteristics of the population, gender --- including gender balance, gender bias, and the gender-related component of the leaky pipeline --- have been the focus of recent work.

The American Astronomical Society's Committee on the Status of Women (CSWA) published the results of a survey in 2013 that provides information on the fraction of women at each level in the astronomical workforce. For graduate students (at all levels) they report F/(F+M)=404/1155 = 0.350, while for postdoctoral researchers F/(F+M)=186/645 = 0.288, and for assistant professors F/(F+M)=57/193= 0.295.

A piece of information missing from this report is the fraction of women in the faculty application pool. I participated in several hiring committees for tenure-track faculty in Astronomy at Ohio State University in recent years, and I found that F/(F+M)=0.2 among our applicants, significantly lower than the fraction of female postdoctoral researchers reported by the CSWA.

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-gender-breakdown-of-applicant-pool.html

Back to top.
2. Why Did You Decide on a PhD in Astronomy and not Physics?

From: David Charbonneau via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

When thinking about the participation of women in astronomy, one of the most intriguing questions is why the percentage of women at each level is much higher in astronomy than physics.

Some readers of this blog may feel that there are enormous differences between the culture of astronomy and the culture of physics, and these cultural differences lead to different rates of participation by women. But, from a distant and broad perspective, it would difficult to identify two academic disciplines that share more in common while still, in many cases, having separate departments: Most astronomers (at least those educated in the U.S.) completed an undergraduate degree in physics, or at least have completed many of the same courses as physics majors. The core methodology of the two disciplines are very similar. The requirements for admission to graduate school are nearly identical; for example, nearly all U.S. PhD programs in astronomy require the Physics GRE and advanced coursework in physics and math.

Despite this, the fractional participation of men and women is quite different, particularly at the junior levels . . .

Read more at

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/03/why-did-you-decide-on-phd-in-astronomy.html

Back to top.
3. 10 Most Influential Female Scientists

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Roz Evans

It's actually incredibly hard to stop writing about amazing female scientists once you start, because there are so many. These scientists are incredible, and there are female scientists who are still in school that are going to be just as incredible in years to come. They might not face the same struggle, but the struggle is still there.

Throughout history women have been overlooked when it comes to recognition, as their contributions were seen as less important simply due to their gender. This is evident in the following stories of these inspirational women. Just because they didn't received the credit when it was due, doesn't mean we have to repeat the same mistakes - we can recognise it now.

Read more at

http://whatculture.com/science/10-most-influential-female-scientists.php

Back to top.
4. Women-In-STEM Pioneer: You Can Always Tell An Ambitious Woman By The Shape Of Her Head

From: Elysse Voyer [elysse.voyer_at_gmail.com]

by Ariel Schwartz

[In the 1960s, Dame Stephanie "Steve" Shirley founded an enormously successful software company that employed mostly women. At TED 2015, she talked about her experiences constantly hitting the glass ceiling (and what happens to the heads of ambitious women).]

On average, tech companies employ just over 13% female engineers. The ones that are employed don't usually stick around; over half of women in science, technology, and engineering step away from their careers-often in their 30s-largely because of rampant sexism in the industry.

No one know more about this than Dame Stephanie "Steve" Shirley, a British Holocaust refugee who founded a software company, called F.I. Group, in 1962. On the TED 2015 stage, Shirley spoke about her experiences being a pioneer for women in STEM-and hitting the glass ceiling "too often."

Read more at

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3043882/women-in-stem-pioneer-you-can-always-tell-an-ambitious-woman-by-the-shape-of-her-head

Back to top.
5. Attention Undergrads: Female Tech Program from JPMorgan Chase

From: WIPHYS Posting for Mar 09, 2015

Tech Connect's goal is to recruit a small number of graduates who love technology - but might not have majored in Computer Science or considered a career in technology - and are excited to learn and develop their coding skills while starting a career at JPMC. Maybe you're familiar with Java or maybe you're not. Either way they want your fresh perspective and innovative thinking. Join Tech Connect - a four-week specialized program with a focus on career development and Java training. It will be your first step in an exciting Technology career at J.P. Morgan.

Tech Connect is a primer leading into the intensive six-week boot camp training and two-year Technology Analyst Program. Bring your unique abilities and experiences to JPMC Technology organization where career possibilities are limitless.

Learn more here

http://techcareers.jpmorgan.com/techcareers/us/opportunities/techconnect

Back to top.
6. APS/AIP Science and Technology Postdoctoral Policy Fellowship: Apply by April 5

From: WIPHYS Posting for Mar 09, 2015

The Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII) in the Department of Education (ED) is considering a fellowship position for a Ph.D. level scientist interested in working on a variety of policy initiatives and research projects. OII is responsible for the coordination and development of major policy initiatives and the Department's annual budget request, working in close collaboration with staff across the Department, with the White House, with Congress, and with external stakeholders to craft policies that will best realize the President's goals of closing the achievement gap and making the United States first in the world in college completion by 2020. The fellowship is for one year, with a possible renewal for a second year.

To begin the application process, send the following to Tyler Glembo [glembo_at_aps.org]: Letter of Intent, Curriculum Vitae, and Three Letters of Recommendation.

Learn more here

http://www.aps.org/policy/fellowships/stem-fellowship.cfm

Back to top.
7. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

- Support Technician in the Department of Physics, University of Bath
https://www.bath.ac.uk/jobs/Vacancy.aspx?ref=SS3024

- Visiting Lecturers-Physics, Wellesley College
https://career.wellesley.edu/postings/728

- Lecturer-Physics, Wellesley College
https://career.wellesley.edu/postings/714

Back to top.
8. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

Back to top.
9. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

Back to top.
10. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

Back to top.