Friday, February 20, 2015

AASWOMEN Newsletter for February 20, 2015

AAS Committee on the Status of Women AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 20, 2015
eds: Daryl Haggard, Nicolle Zellner, Meredith Hughes, & Elysse Voyer

This week's issues:

1. Choosing the Best

2. Leadership and the Myers-Briggs Personality Test

3. Think Again About Gender Gap in Science

4. The Sex Spectrum

5. Do Teachers Discourage Girls from Math and Science?

6. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

8. Access to Past Issues


1. Choosing the Best
From: David Charbonneau via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

And so the committee met to choose between the two finalists.

"It's easy!" announced Professor Tist. "The letter from Dr. Darlon states plainly that she is the best exolonomist of her generation!"

"No, no!" rebutted Professor Tast. "You are not an expert in her subfield like me. Darlon doesn't really think she is the best, he was just being supportive of a young scientist."

"He was?" asked Tist.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/choosing-best.html

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2. Leadership and the Myers-Briggs Personality Test
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In the wake of Kelly Korrick's post, Becoming a Leader, and my own interest, On Leadership, I took the Myers-Briggs personality test. I know several colleagues, family members, and supervisors who have taken the test as part of their management training. The test is available free on-line. I took this version, which is comprised of 60 yes/no questions. I’ve seen other variations, but they are all similar and take only a few minutes. The final results give you a series of letters indicating your personality types as well as the strength in each of the following categories:

* Extraverted (E) vs. Introverted (I), * Sensing (S) vs. Intuition (N), * Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F) * Judging (J) vs. Perceiving (P)

I don’t need a test to tell me that I am Introverted (I), but it also told me the strength of this characteristic. The Extravert-Introvert dimension is a continuum:

Extravert [100% - - - 0% - - - 100%] Introvert

I was reasonably, but not overwhelmingly, introverted.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2015/02/leadership-and-myers-briggs-personality.html

To read the two earlier blog posts on leadership, please see

Becoming a Leader by Kelly Korrick http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/09/becoming-leader.html

On Leadership by Joan Schmelz http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2014/08/on-leadership.html

To take (one version of) the Myers-Briggs Personality Test visit

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp

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3. Think Again About Gender Gap in Science
From: Rick Fienberg [rick.fienberg_at_aas.org]

by Hilary Hurd Anyaso

Bachelor's-to-Ph.D. pipeline in science, engineering no longer 'leaks' more women than men, new 30-year analysis finds.

Scholars from diverse fields have long proposed that interlocking factors such as cognitive abilities, discrimination and interests may cause more women than men to leave the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline after entering college.

Now a new Northwestern University analysis has poked holes in the much referenced "leaky pipeline" metaphor.

http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2015/02/think-again-about-gender-gap-in-science.html

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4. The Sex Spectrum
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_amherst.edu]

[An interesting article in Nature News and a Guardian response, both on the topic of gender binarity (or a lack thereof!). -Eds]

** Sex redefined: The idea of two sexes is simplistic. Biologists now think there is a wider spectrum than that.

by Claire Ainsworth

http://www.nature.com/news/sex-redefined-1.16943

** Nature and sex redefined – we have never been binary

by Vanessa Heggie

http://www.theguardian.com/science/the-h-word/2015/feb/19/nature-sex-redefined-we-have-never-been-binary

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5. Do Teachers Discourage Girls from Math and Science?
From: Deanna Ratnikova via APS Women in Physics

A new study points to the influence of teachers' unconscious biases, but it also highlights how powerful a little encouragement can be. Early educational experiences have a quantifiable effect on the math and science courses the students choose later, and eventually the jobs they get and the wages they earn.

To read more, please see

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/upshot/how-elementary-school-teachers-biases-can-discourage-girls-from-math-and-science.html

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6. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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7. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

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To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

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8. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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