Saturday, March 23, 2013

AASWomen for March 22, 2013

AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy
Issue of March 22, 2013
eds. Caroline Simpson, Michele Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, and Nick Murphy

This week's issues:

1. Obstacles to Institutional Change

2. Up Against the Boards

3. Is There Life After Work?

4. 6 Tips for Surviving a Postdoc

5. Good Beach Reading: The Feminine Mystique

6. More Options, Not Inability, Explains Why Fewer Women Have Science Jobs

7. Call for Submissions for new project: Grandma got STEM

8. IUPAP Working Group on Women in Physics: Supporting Women in Physics in Developing Countries

9. 2014 OUSTA Award of the Society for College Science Teachers

10. Female Visitor Programme seeks applicants

11. Job Opportunities

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter


1. Obstacles to Institutional Change
From: Ed Bertschinger via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

A thoughtful reader made this observation about my article in the 2013 January/February AAS Newsletter:

[T]here is one sentence in your piece that grabbed my attention, and I would argue brings up a point far more substantive than grammar and political correctness: "One grumpy, misogynistic tenured faculty member can cause many difficulties, but he cannot prevent change."

This reader's reaction to my provocative sentence was thoughtful and important.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/03/obstacles-to-institutional-change.html

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2. Up Against the Boards
From: Neil Gehrels via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This blog is close to home for me, from University of Maryland. It is about a study by UMd faculty member Waverly Ding showing the lack of women on corporate boards. Along with co-authors Fiona Murray of MIT and Toby E. Stuart of University of California Berkley, she analyzed survey data of 6,000 U.S. scientists in the biotech industry over a career span of 30 years. In a paper in the Academy of Management Journal, they find that women at the professorial rank are almost 50% less likely to serve on corporate boards and start new companies than equivalent men.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/03/up-against-boards.html

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3. Is There Life After Work?
From: Johanna Teske [jkteske_at_email.arizona.edu]

[A discussion of work-like balance (excerpt below) from Erin Callan, former chief financial officer of Lehman Brothers. -Eds.]

In recent weeks I have been following with interest the escalating debate about work-life balance and the varying positions of Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, Marissa Mayer of Yahoo and the academic Anne-Marie Slaughter, among others. Since I resigned my position as chief financial officer of Lehman Brothers in 2008, amid mounting chaos and a cloud of public humiliation only months before the company went bankrupt, I have had ample time to reflect on the decisions I made in balancing (or failing to balance) my job with the rest of my life. The fact that I call it "the rest of my life" gives you an indication where work stood in the pecking order.

To read the complete article, please see

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/10/opinion/sunday/is-there-life-after-work.html?src=me&ref=general

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4. 6 Tips for Surviving a Postdoc
From: AWIS Washington Wire March - Issue I

For young scientists, a postdoc is the first step toward an independent academic career. Unfortunately, postdocs often struggle during this time as they juggle intense professional demands and increased responsibilities at home. The keys to success in a postdoc come down to maintaining an optimistic outlook in the face of adversity, remaining flexible, building a supportive professional network, and prioritizing happiness.

To read more, please see

http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2013_03_06/caredit.a1300035

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5. Good Beach Reading: The Feminine Mystique
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan has been called the book that changed the consciousness of a country—and the world. Originally published in 1963, this trailblazing book that changed women’s lives is still just as relevant 50 years later.

For the first time in my academic career, I spent Spring Break at the beach. I took not only The Feminine Mystique, but also A Room of One’s Own and The Mercury 13. I came away with a healthy dose of 20th century feminism as well as inspiration.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/03/good-beach-reading-feminine-mystique.html

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6. More Options, Not Inability, Explains Why Fewer Women Have Science Jobs
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

Having a greater number of career options rather than lack of ability, may help explain why fewer women than men pursue careers in math and science, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Science.

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112807190/fewer-women-in-science-more-career-options-032013

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7. Call for Submissions for new project: Grandma got STEM
From: WIPHYS Posting for Mar 22, 2013

[This program was also brought to our attention by Claire Cramer. -Eds.]

The idea is to counter the notion that if you want to explain something difficult to someone non-technical, you should explain it "so your grandmother would understand." Project site at

http://ggstem.wordpress.com

Submit name, pic story/remembrance to Rachel Levy [ggstem_at_hmc.edu]. International submissions welcome.

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8. IUPAP Working Group on Women in Physics: Supporting Women in Physics in Developing Countries
From: WIPHYS Posting for Mar 22, 2013

The APS has received funding to launch a new round of the IUPAP/UNESCO program to fund the attendance of women from developing and eastern European countries at regional or international conferences and schools. We expect to be able to fund 13-14 women between $700 amp; $800 US each at a maximum. Applications for these grants should be received no later than April 15, 2013. Recipients will be chosen by the IUPAP Working Group on Women in Physics by mid May, and we will notify everyone during the first week of June, 2013.

Please contact Jackie Beamon Kiene [beamon_at_aps.org] for complete application information. Applications are due by close of business on April 15, 2013 (5:00p.m. EST).

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9. 2014 OUSTA Award of the Society for College Science Teachers
From: WIPHYS Posting for Mar 22, 2013

Nominations are being sought for the 2014 Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher Award (OUSTA) granted by the Society for College Science Teachers (SCST). This year’s award is also co-sponsored by Springer Science+Business Media. A nominee need not be a member of the SCST. Nominations may be made by colleagues or students and self-nominations are also encouraged! The purpose of the OUSTA is to recognize the achievements of our teaching colleagues who have enhanced the profession as outstanding teachers of science. This annual award is based upon a selection process that evaluates nominees according to the following ranked categories: 1) teaching excellence; 2) scholarship; and 3) service.

For details regarding the nomination and application process, visit

www.scst.org/grants/ousta

The deadline for application materials is June 1, 2013. Questions or Nominations? Email csandler_at_umich.edu

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10. Female Visitor Programme seeks applicants

ASTRON and JIVE are world-leading institutes in radio astronomy, technological research and software development. The Helena Kluyver female visitor programme has been in operation at ASTRON and JIVE for several years. Its goal is to host advanced career female researchers for an extended period of time, in order to exchange experience with younger staff. In addition to sharing professional expertise, an important part of the exchange is in coaching young women to build careers in a male dominated environment. The programme covers all travel, food and accommodation expenses for the visitor, for up to three months.

Each visit is based on a research project in collaboration with a ASTRON or JIVE employee (male or female!). This may be in astronomy research, correlator control systems, connectivity for e-VLBI, antenna design, or other relevant engineering, software or algorithm development. Applications are open to women from any relevant field and any nationality. Applications can be submitted throughout the year. Preference is given to women with several years of relevant experience since their PhD.

For more information, visit the Helena Kluyver web page at

http://tinyurl.com/bf96orb

or email [helenakluyver_at_astron.nl].

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11. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

* Joint Macquarie University/Australian Gemini Office Lectureship in Astronomy and Astrophysics

http://jobs.mq.edu.au/cw/en/job/492726/lecturer-in-astronomy-and-astrophysics

* Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Physics amp; Astronomy at Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, California

http://www.sonoma.edu/aa/fa/prospective/visiting_professor.html

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12. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

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14. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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